References of "Fertility and Sterility"
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See detailDeep infiltrating endometriosis is a determinant factor of cumulative pregnancy rate after intracytoplasmic sperm injection/in vitro fertilization cycles in patients with endometriomas
Ballester, M.; Oppenheimer, A.; Mathieu d'Argent, E. et al

in Fertility and Sterility (2012), 97(2),

Objective: To evaluate the cumulative pregnancy rate (CPR) per patient after in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF-ICSI) cycles in patients with endometriomas and to evaluate the ... [more ▼]

Objective: To evaluate the cumulative pregnancy rate (CPR) per patient after in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF-ICSI) cycles in patients with endometriomas and to evaluate the determinant factors of CPR per patient. Design: Retrospective study from January 2007 to October 2008. Setting: Tertiary care university hospital. Patient(s): 103 patients who had undergone IVF treatment, comprising isolated endometriomas (n 1⁄4 30) and endometriomas with associated deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) (n 1⁄4 73). Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): Clinical pregnancy rate after IVF-ICSI cycle. Result(s): Thetotalnumberofcycleswas162,andthemediannumberofcyclesperpatientwas1(1to5).Fifty-eightwomen(56.3%)becamepregnant. The total number of endometriomas and size of the largest endometrioma and bilateral endometriomas had no impact on the CPR per patient. Using multivariable analysis, the associated DIE and antimu€llerian hormone serum level (%1 ng/mL) were independent factors associated with a decrease in the pregnancy rate per patient. Overall, the CPR per patient was 73.7%, and it increased until the third cycle with no benefit for additional cycles. The CPR per patient for women with isolated endometriomas and women with endometriomas and associated DIE was 82.5% and 69.4%, respectively. Conclusion(s): Associated DIE has a negative impact on assisted reproduction results in patients with endometriomas. Moreover, our data show that after three IVF-ICSI cycles the CPR per patient is not improved and that surgery should be considered [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of percutaneous estradiol–oral progesterone versus oral conjugated equine estrogens–medroxyprogesterone acetate on breast cell proliferation and bcl-2 protein in healthy women
Murkes, Daniel; Conner, P; Leifland, K et al

in Fertility and Sterility (2011), 95(3), 1188-91

In a prospective, randomized clinical study 77 women were assigned randomly to receive sequential hormone therapy with either conventional oral conjugated equine estrogens (0.625 mg) with the addition on ... [more ▼]

In a prospective, randomized clinical study 77 women were assigned randomly to receive sequential hormone therapy with either conventional oral conjugated equine estrogens (0.625 mg) with the addition on 14 of the 28 days of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate (5 mg) or natural E(2) gel (1.5 mg) with oral micronized P (200 mg) on 14 of the 28 days of each cycle. Because oral conjugated equine estrogens-medroxyprogesterone acetate induced a highly significant increase in breast cell proliferation in contrast to percutaneous E(2)-oral P with a difference between therapies approaching significance, the former therapy has a marked impact on the breast whereas natural percutaneous E(2)-oral micronized P has not. [less ▲]

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See detailIs the baboon model appropriate for endometriosis studies?
Dehoux, Jean-Paul; Defrère, Silvie; Squifflet, Jean et al

in Fertility and Sterility (2011), 96(3), 728-7333

Objective To determinethe prevalence of spontaneous endometriosis andthe incidence of induced endometriosis after endocervical canal resection in baboons. Design Induction and follow-up of endometriosis ... [more ▼]

Objective To determinethe prevalence of spontaneous endometriosis andthe incidence of induced endometriosis after endocervical canal resection in baboons. Design Induction and follow-up of endometriosis in baboons, which is one of the primate species that develop spontaneous endometriosis. Forty-one baboons were checked for the presence of spontaneous endometriosis. We then attempted to induce endometriosis in 30 of them by endocervical canal resection. Setting Institute of Primate Research, Nairobi, Kenya, and Catholic University of Louvain, Brussels, Belgium. Animal(s) Forty-one baboons were checked for spontaneous endometriosis and 30 of them were used to develop a model of induced endometriosis. Intervention(s) A total of 41 baboons underwent diagnostic laparoscopy for 10 months. In a first step, 30 of this number subsequently underwent endocervical canal resection. In a second step, 20 of the 30 underwent uterine horn resection. Main Outcome Measure(s) Follow-up by laparoscopy. Result(s) Two of the 41 baboons were diagnosed with spontaneous endometriosis (4.8%). Twelve months after the surgical procedure to induce endometriosis, 8 of 29 animals presented with endometriotic lesions diagnosed by using laparoscopy and confirmed by histologic examination. The incidence of induced endometriosis in our model was thus 27.6%. In 2 baboons, endometriosis disappeared over time, resulting in a final rate of 20.7% (6/29). Conclusion(s) The rate of spontaneous endometriosis is very low (4.8%). Endometriosis can be induced (with a rate of just 27.6%) by endocervical canal resection to stimulate retrograde menstruation. [less ▲]

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See detailReduction of apoptosis and proliferation in endometriosis
Beliard, Aude ULg; Noël, Agnès ULg; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg

in Fertility and Sterility (2004), 82(1), 80-85

Objective: To evaluate whether endometriosis could be related to an impaired balance between apoptosis and proliferation, two processes which could be modulated by hormonal status. Design ... [more ▼]

Objective: To evaluate whether endometriosis could be related to an impaired balance between apoptosis and proliferation, two processes which could be modulated by hormonal status. Design: Immunohistochemical study. Setting: Academic research laboratory. Intervention(s): Endometriotic samples obtained from peritoneum of women aged 26-40 years who were undergoing laparoscopy for pain or infertility. Main Outcome Measure(s): Apoptotic cells were detected with the use of the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The production of p53 and bcl-2, estrogen and Progesterone (P) receptors, and cellular proliferation were assessed by immunohistochemistry in eutopic and ectopic endometria from 30 patients with endometriosis throughout the menstrual cycle. Results were compared with those from normal endometria from 15 fertile patients. Result(s): Endometriotic lesions were characterized by reduced TUNEL and p53 stainings and by enhanced bcl-2 staining. No correlation between apoptosis and estrogen receptor or P receptor levels was found. A lower amount of steroid receptor was found in endometriotic tissues, without cyclic modulation, compared with the eutopic endometrium. Conclusion(s): Our results suggest that when endometrial tissue is located at ectopic locations, it differs from eutopic endometrium by its proliferation rate, steroid hormone levels, and markers of apoptosis. A reduced sensitivity of endometriotic cells to apoptosis could promote the dissemination and implantation of these cells to ectopic sites. (C) 2004 by American Society for Reproductive Medicine. [less ▲]

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See detailAdhesion of endometrial cells labeled with 111 Indium-tropolonate to peritoneum: a novel in vitro model to study endometriosis
Beliard, Aude ULg; Noël, Agnès ULg; Goffin, Frédéric ULg et al

in Fertility and Sterility (2003), 79(Suppl. 1), 724-729

Objective: To evaluate, in a new original in vitro assay, putative factors that could modulate the adhesion of endometrial cells to peritoneum. Design: Prospective, controlled in vitro study. Setting ... [more ▼]

Objective: To evaluate, in a new original in vitro assay, putative factors that could modulate the adhesion of endometrial cells to peritoneum. Design: Prospective, controlled in vitro study. Setting: Academic research laboratory. Patient(s): Fourteen nonmenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy or laparoscopy for benign gynecologic indication. Intervention(s): Endometrial cells obtained from women with regular cycles without endometriosis were labeled with (111)Indium and confronted in vitro with mouse peritoneum in the presence of various cytokines and/or antiadhesive compounds. Main Outcome Measure(s): Radioactivity in (111)Indium-labeled endometrial cells. Result(s): The adhesion of human endometrial cells to mouse peritoneum was increased by treatment with pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin IL-1 beta, IL-6, TNF alpha, TGF-beta1). Whereas heparan sulfate had no effect on cell adhesion, a gel of ferric hyaluronate (Intergel) was able to counteract the pro-adhesive effect of cytokines. Interestingly, the pretreatment of peritoneum with cytokines, 24 hours before cell seeding in the presence of the ferric hyaluronate gel, restored the cytokine-promoting effect on cell adhesion. Conclusion(s): Proinflammatory cytokines promote the in vitro peritoneal adhesion of endometrial cells. An antiadhesive hyaluronate gel used in clinics decreases the adhesion in a dose-dependent manner and reduces cytokine bioavailability. (Fertil Steril((R)) 2003;79(Suppl 1):724-9. (C) 2003 by American Society for Reproductive Medicine.). [less ▲]

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See detailPregnancy in rabbits actively immunized against bovine pregnancy-associated glycoprotein 1
Banga-Mboko, Henri; Halloy, D.; Perenyi, Zsolt et al

in Fertility and Sterility (2003), 79(1), 226-227

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See detailRole of endocrine status and cell type in adhesion of human endometrial cells to the peritoneum in nude mice
Beliard, Aude ULg; Noël, Agnès ULg; Goffin, Frédéric ULg et al

in Fertility and Sterility (2002), 78(5), 973-978

Objective: To investigate the role of different cellular types (epithelial and stromal endometrial cells and peritoneal cells) in the ectopic implantation of endometrium and to evaluate the importance of ... [more ▼]

Objective: To investigate the role of different cellular types (epithelial and stromal endometrial cells and peritoneal cells) in the ectopic implantation of endometrium and to evaluate the importance of endocrine environment on the adhesion of endometrial cells to the peritoneum. Design: Experimental prospective study. Setting: University hospital, department of cell biology. Animal(s): One hundred one nude mice. Intervention(s): Monolayer culture of human epithelial and stromal endometrial cells obtained from patients undergoing hysterectomy or laparoscopy for benign disease. Intraperitoneal injection of cells into nude mice. Main Outcome Measure(s): Two weeks after cell injection, adhesion of endometrial cells was evaluated by histological and immunohistochemical examination. Result(s): Mixed cultures of stromal and epithelial cells, but not purified epithelial or stromal cells alone, adhered to the mouse peritoneum and led to endometriotic-like nodules. Pretreatment of cells with estrogen alone or with estrogen and progestin resulted in a higher percentage of animals developing endometriotic-like nodules, whereas treatment with progestin alone did not affect endometriotic implantation. Conclusion(s): Our data indicate that the success of endometrial cell implantation is dependent on the cooperativeness between stromal and epithelial endometrial cells, as well as on the endocrine environment of endometrial cells, but not that of recipient animals. The results emphasize the role of both endometrial cell types for ectopic implantation. (C) 2002 by American Society for Reproductive Medicine. [less ▲]

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See detailUreteral endometriosis: a complication of rectovaginal endometriotic (adenomyotic) nodules
Donnez, Jacques; NISOLLE, Michelle ULg; Squifflet, Jean

in Fertility and Sterility (2002), 77(1), 32-37

Objective: To present data from 18 cases of ureteral endometriosis. Design: Prospective clinical study. Setting: Department of gynecology at a university hospital. Patient(s): Four hundred and five ... [more ▼]

Objective: To present data from 18 cases of ureteral endometriosis. Design: Prospective clinical study. Setting: Department of gynecology at a university hospital. Patient(s): Four hundred and five patients with severe dysmenorrhea or deep dyspareunia due to a rectovaginal endometriotic (adenomyotic) nodule. Intervention(s): Patients were prospectively evaluated using intravenous pyelography. All patients underwent laparoscopic surgery to remove rectovaginal adenomyosis and ureterolysis. Main Outcome Measure(s): Presurgical and postsurgical evaluation and histologic analysis. Result(s): Preoperative intravenous pyelography revealed ureteral stenosis with ureterohydronephrosis in 18 patients (4.4%). A significantly higher prevalence (11.2%) was observed in nodules ≥ 3 cm in diameter. Five women (20%) had complete ureteral stenosis. Kidney scintigraphy revealed damaged kidney parenchymal function, which ranged from 18% to 42%. Laparoscopic ureterolysis was done in 16 women; 2 women underwent ureteral resection and uretero-ureterostomy. A significant postoperative decrease in ureterohydronephrosis was noted in all patients; however, renal function improved only slightly. Conclusion(s): Ureteral endometriosis was found in 4.4% of patients with rectovaginal endometriotic (adenomyotic) nodules. Ureterolysis and removal of associated adenomyotic lesions was sufficient therapy in most patients; two required resection of the ureteral stenotic segment. Intravenous pyelography should be performed in all women with rectovaginal nodules ≥ 3 cm to prevent nonreversible loss of renal function. [less ▲]

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See detailAttachment of “menstrual” endometrium to peritoneum?
Donnez, Jacques; NISOLLE, Michelle ULg

in Fertility and Sterility (2001), 76(3), 642

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See detailComparison of G1.2/G2.2 and Sydney IVF cleavage/blastocyst sequential media for the culture of human embryos: a prospective, randomized, comparative study.
Van Langendonckt, Anne; Demylle, Dominique; Wyns, Christine et al

in Fertility and Sterility (2001), 76(5), 1023-31

Objective: To compare two commercially available sequential media, G1.2/G2.2 and Sydney IVF cleavage/blastocyst media, as supports for human embryo culture. Design: Prospective randomized study. Setting ... [more ▼]

Objective: To compare two commercially available sequential media, G1.2/G2.2 and Sydney IVF cleavage/blastocyst media, as supports for human embryo culture. Design: Prospective randomized study. Setting: University-based IVF clinic. Patient(s): Two hundred forty-nine patients undergoing IVF treatment for the first or second time, randomly allocated at the time of oocyte retrieval, to either culture in G1.2/G2.2 or Sydney IVF media. Intervention(s): Oocyte recovery, IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection, embryo culture, transfer on day 3 or day 5/6. Main Outcome Measure(s): Developmental stage on day 3, blastocyst rate, pregnancy outcome as assessed by βhCG positive test, implantation rates, and ongoing pregnancies. Result(s): Embryos cultured in G1.2/G2.2 media displayed a faster kinetics of cleavage, compaction, blastulation, and hatching, but a lower day 3 embryo quality than those grown in Sydney IVF media. For patients with at least five embryos, G1.2/G2.2 media yielded higher implantation rates (26.2%) in our day 3 embryo transfer program when compared to Sydney IVF medium (15.5%), whereas similar implantation rates were obtained for day 5/6 embryo transfer for both media (43.1% and 36.1%, respectively). Conclusion(s): In our day 3 embryo transfer program, G1.2/G2.2 media were superior to Sydney IVF media, whereas both media yielded similar outcomes in our blastocyst transfer program. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes ovarian surgery for endometriomas impair the ovarian response to gonadotropin?
Donnez, Jacques; Wyns, Christine; NISOLLE, Michelle ULg

in Fertility and Sterility (2001), 76(4), 662-5

Objective: To evaluate the ovarian response to stimulation conducted for IVF treatment in women who have undergone conservative surgery for endometriomas. Design: Retrospective study with prospective ... [more ▼]

Objective: To evaluate the ovarian response to stimulation conducted for IVF treatment in women who have undergone conservative surgery for endometriomas. Design: Retrospective study with prospective selection of participants and controls. Setting: University infertility clinic. Patient(s): A series of 374 women who underwent in vitro fertilization (IVF). The study group consisted of 85 patients with ovarian endometriomas who had undergone laparoscopic surgery in an attempt to become pregnant, but had failed within a year of surgery. The control group consisted of 289 patients with tubal factor infertility. Intervention(s): IVF-embryo transfer procedures. Main Outcome Measure(s): Stimulation parameters, fertilization, implantation, and pregnancy rates were analyzed in both groups. Result(s): There was no significant difference between the two groups in stimulation parameters or IVF outcome. Conclusion(s): A total of 820 cycles were analyzed. A similar IVF-ET outcome was observed in patients with endometriosis after ablation of endometriomas compared to women with tubal factors. In conclusion, endometrioma surgery by internal wall vaporization does not impair IVF outcome. The clinical pregnancy rate was respectively 37.4% and 34.6% in the endometriosis group and the control group. [less ▲]

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See detailPredictive value of ovarian endometriosis?
NISOLLE, Michelle ULg; Donnez, Jacques

in Fertility and Sterility (2000), 73(2), 419-20

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See detailEarly-stage endometriosis: adhesion and growth of human menstrual endometrium in nude mice
NISOLLE, Michelle ULg; Casanas-Roux, Françoise; Donnez, Jacques

in Fertility and Sterility (2000), 74(2), 306-12

Objective: To evaluate the implantation of menstrual endometrium and the early stages of evolution of endometriotic lesions. Design: Experimental prospective study. Setting: An academic research ... [more ▼]

Objective: To evaluate the implantation of menstrual endometrium and the early stages of evolution of endometriotic lesions. Design: Experimental prospective study. Setting: An academic research environment. Animals: Ten nude mice. Intervention(s): A minilaparotomy was performed to place fresh human menstrual endometrial samples in the peritoneal cavity. Removal of the transplants was performed successively on days 1, 3, and 5 by laparotomy. Main Outcome Measure(s): Adhesion of endometrial fragments and early stages of endometrial lesions was morphologically and immunohistochemically studied. Result(s): As early as day 1, stromal cells were found to be attached to the mesothelium. A progressive reorganization of epithelial and stromal cells into endometrial glands was observed. On day 5, cystic endometriotic lesions were characterized by more extensive proliferative activity in glandular cells and a higher VEGF score in stromal cells than that observed in previously removed transplants. Conclusion(s): Menstrual human endometrium is able to implant on intact mesothelium and to reorganize itself into structured glands and stroma under the influence of unknown factors. We suggest that stromal and glandular cells have two distinct roles: stromal cells are involved in the attachment process and glandular cells in the growth of the endometriotic lesion. [less ▲]

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See detailBladder endometriosis must be considered as bladder adenomyosis
Donnez, Jacques; Spada, Francesca; Squifflet, Jean et al

in Fertility and Sterility (2000), 74(6), 1175-1181

Objective: To present data from a series of 17 cases of bladder endometriosis. Design: Clinical study. Setting: A university hospital department of gynecology. Patient(s): Seventeen patients complaining ... [more ▼]

Objective: To present data from a series of 17 cases of bladder endometriosis. Design: Clinical study. Setting: A university hospital department of gynecology. Patient(s): Seventeen patients complaining of menstrual urinary symptoms and/or pelvic pain. Intervention(s): Diagnosis and resection of a bladder adenomyotic nodule. Main Outcome Measure(s): Histologic analysis and postsurgical outcome. Result(s): Seventy-six percent of the patients reported menstrual mictalgia and pollakiuria, and 88% reported dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia. Cystoscopy, intravenous pyelography, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a nodular mass in the anterior fornix adjacent to the uterine wall, developed in the vesical muscularis and involving the vesical mucosa in all cases but one. The bladder nodule was associated with a rectovaginal nodule in six cases (35%). Because recurrence was noted soon after cessation of medical therapy, surgical excision was proposed. The vesical mucosa was found to be intact in almost all cases, so extramucosal laparoscopic excision was the method of choice. Histologic examination proved that 90% of the nodule consisted of smooth muscle hyperplasia. Conclusion(s): So-called bladder endometriosis is actually an adenomyotic nodule of the bladder which, from a histologic point of view, is similar to a rectovaginal adenomyotic nodule and frequently (35%) associated with it. [less ▲]

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See detailEndometrial laser intrauterine thermotherapy: the first series of 100 patients observed for 1 year
Donnez, Jacques; Polet, Roland; Rabinovitz, Rafi et al

in Fertility and Sterility (2000), 74(4), 791-6

Objective: To describe a new instrument (GyneLase®) that offers a new approach (endometrial laser intrauterine thermal therapy [ELITT]) to treatment of menorrhagia and to evaluate the efficacy of ELITT in ... [more ▼]

Objective: To describe a new instrument (GyneLase®) that offers a new approach (endometrial laser intrauterine thermal therapy [ELITT]) to treatment of menorrhagia and to evaluate the efficacy of ELITT in the management of dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Design: Prospective study. Setting: University hospital. Patient(s): 100 premenopausal women with dysfunctional uterine bleeding were observed for 1 year. Intervention(s): Intrauterine laser thermotherapy with a diode laser. Main Outcome Measurement(s): Amenorrhea rate after 1 year. Result(s): The amenorrhea rate after 1 year of follow-up was 71%, and the rate of amenorrhea/severe hypomenorrhea rate was >90%; these rates are much higher than those in the literature after such procedures as electrosurgery or intrauterine thermal balloon therapy. The ELITT procedure is an inherently safe and simple alternative, providing controlled and effective treatment of the entire endometrium. In contrast to traditional endometrial ablation using a neodymium yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, the ELITT procedure does not require intensive training or hysteroscopic control; it is also far less risky, because the power used per unit area is 1,000 times lower. Conclusion(s): The ELITT procedure is a new nonhysteroscopic technique for endometrial ablation. The technique is very safe and offers the highest amenorrhea rate to date in the literature. [less ▲]

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See detailHistologic and ultrastructural evaluation of fresh and frozen-thawed human ovarian xenografts in nude mice
NISOLLE, Michelle ULg; Casanas-Roux, Françoise; Qu, Jianping et al

in Fertility and Sterility (2000), 74(1), 122-129

Objective: To compare histologic and ultrastructural characteristics of fresh and frozen-thawed human ovarian cortical tissue grafted into nude mice. Design: Experimental prospective study. Setting: An ... [more ▼]

Objective: To compare histologic and ultrastructural characteristics of fresh and frozen-thawed human ovarian cortical tissue grafted into nude mice. Design: Experimental prospective study. Setting: An academic research environment. Patient(s): Ovarian biopsy specimens were obtained from 13 women undergoing laparoscopy for tubal ligation or infertility. Animal(s): Forty nude mice. Intervention(s): A minilaparotomy was performed to place fresh and frozen-thawed ovarian grafts subcutaneously (sc) or intraperitoneally (ip). Removal of the ovarian grafts was performed at 24 days. Main Outcome Measure(s): [1] the follicular population, [2] fibrosis, [3] vascularization of the grafted tissue, and [4] ultrastructural evaluation. Result(s): A greater fibrosis relative surface area was noted in frozen-thawed transplanted tissue than in fresh transplants. Regardless of this fibrosis, a similar follicular density was observed in fresh and frozen-thawed ovarian tissue 24 days after transplantation. Active angiogenesis was proved by both immunohistochemical study of the vascular endothelial growth factor and morphometric study of the vascular network. Normal ultrastructural characteristics were noted in frozen-thawed ovarian biopsies. Conclusion(s): Angiogenesis allows implantation of the graft even if it has been cryopreserved and thawed similarly to implantation of fresh tissue. The greater fibrosis observed in grafts after cryopreservation and implantation does not seem to affect the primordial and primary ovocyte population and their ultrastructural characteristics, but further studies must be conducted to prove that after cryopreservation and transplantation, ovocytes may achieve full maturation and fertilization. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of transforming growth factor-alpha, epidermal growth factor, and epidermal growth factor receptor in follicles of human ovarian tissue before and after cryopreservation.
Qu, Jian Ping; NISOLLE, Michelle ULg; Donnez, Jacques

in Fertility and Sterility (2000), 74(1), 113-121

Objective: To study the expression of transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and EGF receptor in follicles of human ovarian tissue. Design: A retrospective, controlled ... [more ▼]

Objective: To study the expression of transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and EGF receptor in follicles of human ovarian tissue. Design: A retrospective, controlled comparative study. Setting: In vitro fertilization laboratory of a university hospital. Patient(s): Fifteen women with regular menstrual cycles who underwent laparoscopy and the biopsy of ovarian tissue. Intervention(s): Paraffin sections were prepared from ovarian tissues, followed by immunohistochemical staining of TGF-α, EGF, and EGF receptor. Main Outcome Measure(s): Immunostaining for TGF-α, EGF, and EGF receptor in follicles of fresh and frozen ovarian tissues. Result(s): Immunoreactivities for TGF-α and EGF receptor were observed simultaneously in the oocytes of primordial, primary, preantral, and antral follicles. Strong staining for TGF-α and EGF receptor was present in thecal cells. The TGF-α and EGF receptor was also expressed in some granulosa cells of primary to antral follicles. The EGF only stained weakly in the oocytes of primordial and primary follicles and in thecal cells. There was no difference in staining patterns for TGF-α, EGF, and EGF receptor between fresh and frozen ovarian tissues. Conclusion(s): The TGF-α and EGF receptor was expressed in primordial to antral follicles, indicating a role of TGF-α in regulating follicular development through binding to the EGF receptor. Freeze-thawing did not substantially alter immunoreactivites for TGF-α, EGF, and EGF receptor in frozen ovarian tissue. [less ▲]

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See detailEstradiol and Progesterone Regulate the Proliferation of Human Breast Epithelial Cells
Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg; Colin, Carine; Denoo, Xavier et al

in Fertility and Sterility (1998), 69(5), 963-9

OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of estradiol and progesterone on the proliferation of normal human breast epithelial cells in vivo. DESIGN: Double-blind randomized study. SETTING: Departments of ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of estradiol and progesterone on the proliferation of normal human breast epithelial cells in vivo. DESIGN: Double-blind randomized study. SETTING: Departments of gynecology and of cell biology at a university hospital. PATIENT(S): Forty postmenopausal women with untreated menopause and documented plasma FSH levels of >30 mIU/mL and estradiol levels of <20 pg/mL. INTERVENTION(S): Daily topical application to both breasts of a gel containing a placebo, estradiol, progesterone, or a combination of estradiol and progesterone during the 14 days preceding esthetic breast surgery or excision of a benign lesion. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Plasma and breast tissue concentrations of estradiol and progesterone. Epithelial cell cycles were evaluated in normal breast tissue by counting mitoses and performing quantitative proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunolabeling analyses. RESULT(S): Increasing the estradiol concentration enhanced the number of cycling epithelial cells, whereas increasing the progesterone concentration significantly limited the number of cycling epithelial cells. CONCLUSION(S): Exposure to progesterone for 14 days reduced the estradiol-induced proliferation of normal breast epithelial cells in vivo. [less ▲]

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See detailLocalization of Laminin, Fibronectin, E-Cadherin, and Integrins in Endometrium and Endometriosis
Beliard, Aude ULg; Donnez, J.; Nisolle, Michelle ULg et al

in Fertility and Sterility (1997), 67(2), 266-72

OBJECTIVE: To compare the localization of adhesion proteins (laminin and fibronectin) and their receptors of the integrin family in endometriosis and endometrium. DESIGN: An immunohistochemical study ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To compare the localization of adhesion proteins (laminin and fibronectin) and their receptors of the integrin family in endometriosis and endometrium. DESIGN: An immunohistochemical study. SETTING: University Hospital, Department of Gynecology and Department of Cell Biology. PATIENT(s): Eighteen endometriosis patients undergoing laparoscopy for pain or infertility and nine control patients undergoing laparoscopy for sterilization or hysterectomy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(s): The expression of adhesion glycoproteins (laminin and fibronectin), their receptors alpha 1 beta 1, alpha 2 beta 1, alpha 3 beta 1, alpha 5 beta 1, and alpha 6 beta 1, and E-cadherin was determined by immunohistochemistry on frozen sections. RESULT(s): The distribution of both adhesive glycoproteins, laminin and fibronectin, and their receptors was identical in endometriosis and endometrium. Fibronectin receptors (alpha 4 beta 1, alpha 5 beta 1) displayed distinct expression patterns in endometrium and endometriosis. No endometrial glands showed positive staining for the alpha 5 chain, whereas this integrin subunit was detected in almost all endometriotic lesions. The integrin alpha 4 chain was present in all endometriotic glands but was absent from endometrial glands in the proliferative phase of the cycle. CONCLUSION(s): No difference in cell adhesion molecule localization nor receptors was observed between endometriotic and endometrial samples, except for fibronectin receptors. Their expression persisted around endometriotic glands but not in endometrium. These results suggest that fibronectin receptors could play a role in the persistence of endometriotic lesions, despite menstruation in corresponding eutopic endometrium. [less ▲]

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