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See detailDeletion of exons 1-3 of the MEN1 gene in a large Italian family causes the loss of menin expression.
Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Tagliati, Federico; Di Ruvo, Mauro et al

in Familial cancer (2014)

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease, characterized by parathyroid adenomas, endocrine gastroenteropancreatic tumors and pituitary adenomas, due to ... [more ▼]

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease, characterized by parathyroid adenomas, endocrine gastroenteropancreatic tumors and pituitary adenomas, due to inactivating mutations of the MEN1 gene (chromosome 11q13). MEN1 mutations are mainly represented by nonsense, deletions/insertions, splice site or missense mutations that can be detected by direct sequencing of genomic DNA. However, MEN1 patients with large heterozygous deletions may escape classical genetic screening and may be misidentified as phenocopies, thereby hindering proper clinical surveillance. We employed a real-time polymerase chain reaction application, the TaqMan copy number variation assay, to evaluate a family in which we failed to identify an MEN1 mutation by direct sequencing, despite a clear clinical diagnosis of MEN1 syndrome. Using the TaqMan copy number variation assay we identified a large deletion of the MEN1 gene involving exons 1 and 2, in three affected family members, but not in the other nine family members that were to date clinically unaffected. The same genetic alteration was not found in a group of ten unaffected subjects, without family history of endocrine tumors. The MEN1 deletion was further confirmed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, which showed the deletion extended from exon 1 to exon 3. This new approach allowed us to correctly genetically diagnose three clinical MEN1 patients that were previously considered as MEN1 phenocopies. More importantly, we excluded the presence of genetic alterations in the unaffected family members. These results underline the importance of using a variety of available biotechnology approaches when pursuing a genetic diagnosis in a clinically suggestive setting of inherited endocrine cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailBRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CDKN2A germline mutations in patients with breast cancer and cutaneous melanoma
Monnerat, C.; Chompret, A.; Kannengiesser, C. et al

in Familial Cancer (2007), 6(4), 453-461

Purpose From epidemiological studies it appears that breast cancer (BC) and cutaneous melanoma (CMM) in the same individual occur at a higher frequency than expected by chance. Genetic factors common to ... [more ▼]

Purpose From epidemiological studies it appears that breast cancer (BC) and cutaneous melanoma (CMM) in the same individual occur at a higher frequency than expected by chance. Genetic factors common to both cancers can be suspected. Our goal was to estimate the involvement of "high risk" genes in patients presenting these two neoplasia, selected irrespectively from family history and age at diagnosis. Experimental Design Eighty two patients with BC and CMM were screened for BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, CDKN2A and CDK4 (exon 2) germline mutations. Results Deleterious mutations were identified in 6 patients: two carriers of a BRCA1 germline mutation, two carriers of TP53 germline mutations (one of which also harbored a BRCA2 deleterious mutation, the other one a BRCA2 unclassified variant), and two carriers of a CDKN2A germline mutation. In addition, 6 variants of unknown signification were identified in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Regarding family history, 3/13 (23%) patients with a positive family history of BC or CMM were carriers of a germline mutation, whereas only 3/69 (4%) patients without family history were carriers of a germline mutation. Conclusion Our findings show that few patients with BC and CMM who lacked family histories of these cancers are carriers of deleterious germline mutations in four of the five genes we examined. We describe for the first time, two simultaneous BRCA2 and TP53 mutations, suggesting that analysis in more than one gene could be performed if a patient's personal or familial history does not match a single syndrome. [less ▲]

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