References of "Experimental Gerontology"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAnhedonic-like traits and lack of affective deficits in 18-month-old C57BL/6 mice: Implications for modeling elderly depression.
Malatynska, Ewa; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; Redkozubova, Olga et al

in Experimental Gerontology (2012), 47(8), 552-64

The prevalence of depression increases with aging. We hypothesized that like humans, old animals exhibit anhedonic-like behavior, along with signs of behavioral despair. In rodents, anhedonia, a reduced ... [more ▼]

The prevalence of depression increases with aging. We hypothesized that like humans, old animals exhibit anhedonic-like behavior, along with signs of behavioral despair. In rodents, anhedonia, a reduced sensitivity to reward, which is listed as a core feature of major depression in the DSM-IVR, can be measured by a decrease in intake of and preference for sweet solutions. Here, sucrose intake, forced swimming, immobility in the modified tail suspension test, novelty exploration, grooming, anxiety and locomotor activity were compared in naive 3- and 18-month-old male C57BL/6 mice. The absolute amounts and the ratio of consumed 1% sucrose solution to water intake was significantly smaller in 18-month-old mice than in 3-month-old mice. The consumption of 5%-sucrose solution requiring high levels of drinking effort, novelty exploration in two setups and grooming behavior in the splash test were reduced in older animals. Analysis of other behaviors suggested that the above-mentioned signs of anhedonic-like traits were unlikely to be attributable to the potential effect of aging on metabolic needs for water, taste perception, motor capabilities or the induction of essential anxiety and neophobia. A 4-week treatment with the antidepressant imipramine (7mg/kg/day) or dimebon, a compound with suggested neuroprotective proneurogenic properties (1mg/kg/day) restored sucrose intake and preference in 18-month-old mice. Meanwhile, young and old mice showed no differences in the parameters of behavioral despair evaluated in the forced swim and modified tail suspension tests. Thus, the behavioral profile of aged mice parallels that of humans with elderly depression, in whom the symptoms of hedonic deficits typically outweigh affective disturbances. The assessment of anhedonic-like traits with the sucrose preference test in 18-month-old mice will be useful in preclinical studies of elderly depression. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOccurrence of cardiovascular calcifications in normal, aging rats.
Roosens, B; Bala, G; Droogmans, S et al

in Experimental Gerontology (2012), 47(8), 614-9

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular calcification is an independent predictor of morbidity and mortality and increases with age. Animal models are frequently used to investigate the underlying pathophysiology ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular calcification is an independent predictor of morbidity and mortality and increases with age. Animal models are frequently used to investigate the underlying pathophysiology. Only scarce data regarding the effect of aging on calcifications in these animal models are available. The aim of this study is to investigate the occurrence of cardiovascular calcifications in normal, aging rats. METHODS: A mixed inbred/outbred population of 44 male Lewis/Wistar rats was studied. Group 1 of three-month-old rats, group 2 twelve-month-old, group 3 twenty-four-month-old and group 4 thirty-month-old rats. Calibrated integrated backscatter (cIB) values and blood parameters (creatinine, parathyroid hormone (PTH)) were measured, followed by ex-vivo micro-CT and histology as reference methods. RESULTS: Cardiovascular calcifications developed with age, as demonstrated by significantly increasing cIB values of the aortic valve and myocardium. This was confirmed by a significant increase in the calcified volume on ex-vivo micro-CT and in the histological calcium score. There was also a significantly higher level of creatinine and PTH with age. CONCLUSIONS: As in humans, cardiovascular calcifications progressively increase with age in the normal rat. Therefore the aging rat model could be used for studying calcifying cardiovascular disease. cIB might have a value in future studies for the early detection of subclinical calcifications in humans. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDifferentially abundant transcripts in PBMC of hospitalized geriatric patients with hip fracture compared to healthy aged controls
Vo, Thi Kim Duy; Godard, Patrice; de Saint-Hubert, Marie et al

in Experimental Gerontology (2011), 46

The abundance of a selection of transcript species involved in in!ammation, immunosenescence and stress response was compared between PBMC of 35 geriatric patients with hip fracture in acute phase (days ... [more ▼]

The abundance of a selection of transcript species involved in in!ammation, immunosenescence and stress response was compared between PBMC of 35 geriatric patients with hip fracture in acute phase (days 2–4 after hospitalization) or convalescence phase (days 7–10) and 28 healthy aged controls. Twenty-nine differentially abundant transcripts were identi"ed in acute phase versus healthy ageing. Twelve of these transcripts remained differentially abundant in convalescence phase, and 22 were similarly differentially abundant in acute phase of geriatric infectious diseases. Seven of these 22 transcripts were previously identi"ed as differentially abundant in PBMC of healthy aged versus healthy young controls, with further alteration for CD28, CD69, LCK, CTSD, HMOX1, and TNFRSF1A in acute phase after geriatric hip fracture and infectious diseases. The next question is whether these alterations are common to other geriatric diseases and/or preexist before the clinical onset of the diseases. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTranscriptomic biomarkers of human ageing in peripheral blood mononuclear cell total RNA
Duy Vo, Thy Kim; Godard, Patrice; de Saint-Hubert, Marie et al

in Experimental Gerontology (2010), 45

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRegional variability in mottled subclinical melanoderma in the elderly.
Petit, Ludivine; Fogouang, L.; Uhoda, Isabelle et al

in Experimental Gerontology (2003), 38(3), 327-31

The density in melanin chromatophores becomes heterogeneous in the epidermis during the early events of photoaging. Little is known about the regional variability in the resulting mottled skin appearance ... [more ▼]

The density in melanin chromatophores becomes heterogeneous in the epidermis during the early events of photoaging. Little is known about the regional variability in the resulting mottled skin appearance on the sun-exposed parts of the body in the elderly. The relationship between these features and the dermal atrophy related to aging is also an area ripe for study. The aim of the present study was to objectively assess and compare such aspects of photoaging in older subjects. A computer-assisted video camera equipped with an internal ultraviolet-emitting unit (Visioscan) was used in combination with image analysis to quantify the infraclinical mottling of the skin on the forehead, neck and dorsal forearm. A Densi Score device served to assess the dermal atrophy by rating the skin folding capacity. A mottled subclinical melanoderma was disclosed on the three evaluation sites in all subjects irrespective of their phototypes. Three main patterns were identified corresponding to regular perifollicular dots, streaky macules along shallow wrinkles and unevenly shaped macules in the interfollicular area. The extent in melanoderma was larger on the forehead than on the neck and forearm. The age after 60 years did not influence the severity of mottled melanoderma, but clearly altered the skin folding capacity. The greatest inter-individual differences in mottled melanoderma were found in phototype II subjects. In conclusion, infraclinical mottled melanoderma is present in all individuals after 60 years of age. This type of epidermal photoaging does not appear to be influenced in older ages. By contrast, skin laxity due to dermal aging continues to progress beyond the age of 60 years. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAge- and Body Mass Index-Related Changes in Cutaneous Shear Wave Velocity
Hermanns-Le, Trinh ULg; Jonlet, F.; Scheen, André ULg et al

in Experimental Gerontology (2001), 36(2), 363-72

BACKGROUND: The in vivo visco-elastic characteristics of skin depend on a series of physiopathological parameters. Among them, the age-related intrinsic tensile properties and the preconditioning of the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The in vivo visco-elastic characteristics of skin depend on a series of physiopathological parameters. Among them, the age-related intrinsic tensile properties and the preconditioning of the tissues set under tension by the hypodermal volume might be of importance. AIMS: To revisit the influence of age and body mass on the firmness and mechanical anisotropy of the skin as determined by the velocity of the shear wave propagation. METHOD: Resonance running time measurements (RRTM) were performed on the mid volar forearm in 110 adults of both sexes. In each subject 16 RRTM were collected at four different precise angles with regard to the limb axis. We recorded the lowest, the highest and the mean multidirectional RRTM as well as the coefficient of variation (CV) of the latter value. In addition, the body mass index (BMI) was calculated. RESULTS: Age and BMI did not influence the minimum RRTM. In contrast, the maximum RRTM as well as the mean and CV of the multidirectional RRTM, significantly rose in a progressively increasing proportion of the subjects older than 60 years. These changes were only encountered in subjects with a normal BMI ranging from 18 to 25. Sex-related differences were not disclosed. CONCLUSIONS: The intrinsic skin tension lines identified by the minimum RRTM are not significantly altered with age and BMI variations. In contrast, skin laxity identified by larger maximum and mean multidirectional RRTM may increase after 60 years of age in subjects with a normal BMI. This is accompanied by increased skin mechanical anisotropy identified by CV values of the multidirectional RRTM over 40%. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExperimental gerontology in Belgium: from model organisms to age-related pathologies
Toussaint, Olivier; Baret, P. V.; Brion, J.-P. et al

in Experimental Gerontology (2000), 35(8), 901-916

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCalcitonin and Postmenopausal Bone Loss
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; DEROISY, Rita ULg; Lecart, MP et al

in Experimental Gerontology (1990), 25

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (2 ULg)