References of "Ecology of Freshwater Fish"
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See detailThe behavioural repertoire of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus (L.)) in captivity: A case study for testing ethogram completeness and reducing observer effects
Bolgan, Marta ULg; O' Brien, Joanne; Gammell, Martin

in Ecology of Freshwater Fish (2015), 25(2), 318-328

In the last 20 years, research has been directed towards possible differences in the mating behaviour of species belonging to the Salmonidae family that may reproductively isolate wild populations from ... [more ▼]

In the last 20 years, research has been directed towards possible differences in the mating behaviour of species belonging to the Salmonidae family that may reproductively isolate wild populations from escaped hatchery or farmed fish. Despite these studies, a detailed description of the overall behavioural repertoire of Salmonidae species from wild and farmed environments is still lacking. Furthermore, although Arctic charr has been described as the most variable between all vertebrate species, possible behavioural plasticity outside of the breeding season has not been widely investigated, and a complete ethogram for Arctic charr not in breeding condition is currently unavailable. This study presents the first complete ethogram of captive Arctic charr behaviour outside of the breeding season. The completeness of this ethogram was validated based on the Behavioural Accumulation Curves methodology, a reliable and easy to use tool for assessing the best compromise between sampling effort and ethogram completeness. Additionally, a new way of presenting an ethogram has been proposed and validated using a dichotomous key to describe behaviour types. This proved to be a more effective operational tool for identifying Arctic charr behaviour than the ethogram. The dichotomous key of behaviour led to a significantly less ambiguous identification of behavioural units, thus reducing observer, recording errors and enhancing accuracy. This study therefore represents an effective step forward to a more in-depth and rigorous comparison of Arctic charr behavioural adaptation between and within artificial and natural settings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. [less ▲]

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See detailEscapement success and patterns of downstream migration of female silver eel Anguilla anguilla in the River Meuse
Verbiest, Hilde; Breukelaar, André; Ovidio, Michaël ULg et al

in Ecology of Freshwater Fish (2012), 21

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See detailBrown trout fry move inshore at night: a choice of water depth or velocity?
Bardonnet, A.; Poncin, Pascal ULg; Roussel, J. M.

in Ecology of Freshwater Fish (2006), 15(3), 309-314

The instream positions of brown trout fry differ between daylight and darkness. According to field and laboratory observations, recently emerged 0+ brown trout use shallow and slow-flowing areas close to ... [more ▼]

The instream positions of brown trout fry differ between daylight and darkness. According to field and laboratory observations, recently emerged 0+ brown trout use shallow and slow-flowing areas close to the bank at night and tend to move off-shore during daylight. In laboratory channels, we tested whether the use of habitats close to the river bank could be attributed to a choice of either water depth or velocity. In two complementary experiments, emerging brown trout alevins were given the choice of using shallow-slow or deep-swift habitats (experiment 1), and deep-slow or shallow-swift habitats (experiment 2). At night, a persistent preference for the shallow habitats was displayed, regardless of velocity. It was concluded that swim-up brown trout fry respond to shallowness rather than ambient low water velocity when selecting habitats close to the bank at night. The behavioural significance of this result and implications for river management are discussed. [less ▲]

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