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See detailAntiresorptive Drugs Beyond Bisphosphonates and Selective Oestrogen Receptor Modulators for the Management of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Neuprez, A.; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg et al

in Drugs & aging (2014), 31

Osteoporotic fractures are a major cause of morbidity in the elderly population. Since postmenopausal osteoporosis is related to an increase in osteoclastic activity at the time of menopause, inhibitors ... [more ▼]

Osteoporotic fractures are a major cause of morbidity in the elderly population. Since postmenopausal osteoporosis is related to an increase in osteoclastic activity at the time of menopause, inhibitors of bone resorption have genuinely been considered an adequate strategy for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates and selective oestrogen receptor modulators are widely prescribed to treat osteoporosis. However, other antiresorptive drugs have been developed for the management of osteoporosis, with the objective of providing a substantial reduction in osteoporotic fractures at all skeletal sites, combined with an acceptable long-term skeletal and systemic safety profile. Denosumab, a human monoclonal antibody to receptor activator for nuclear factor kappa B ligand, has shown efficacy against vertebral, nonvertebral and hip fractures. Its administration every 6 months as a subcutaneous formulation might significantly influence compliance and persistence to therapy. Additional results regarding long-term skeletal safety (i.e. osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical diaphyseal femoral fracture) are needed. Odanacatib, a selective cathepsin K inhibitor, is a promising new approach to the inhibition of osteoclastic resorption, with the potential to uncouple bone formation from bone resorption. Results regarding its anti-fracture efficacy are expected in the coming months. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucosamine and chondroitin sulfate as therapeutic agents for knee and hip Osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Drugs & Aging (2007), 24(7), 573-580

Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a public health problem throughout the world. Several entities have been carefully investigated for the symptomatic and structural management of ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a public health problem throughout the world. Several entities have been carefully investigated for the symptomatic and structural management of OA. This review evaluates published studies of the effect of glucosamine salts and chondroitin sulfate preparations on the progression of knee or hip OA. Despite multiple double-blind, controlled clinical trials of the use of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate in OA, controversy regarding the efficacy of these agents with respect to symptomatic improvement remains. Several potential confounders, including placebo response, use of prescription medicines versus over-the-counter pills or food supplements, or use of glucosamine sulfate versus glucosamine hydrochloride, may have relevance when attempting to interpret the seemingly contradictory results of different clinical trials. The National Institutes of Health-sponsored GAIT (Glucosamine/chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial) compared placebo, glucosamine hydrochloride, chondroitin sulfate, a combination of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate and celecoxib in a parallel, blinded 6-month multicentre study of patients with knee OA. This trial showed that glucosamine hydrochloride and chondroitin sulfate alone or in combination did not reduce pain effectively in the overall group of patients with OA of the knee. However, exploratory analyses suggest that the combination of glucosamine hydrochloride and chondroitin sulfate may be effective in the subgroup of patients with moderate-to-severe knee pain. For decades, the traditional pharmacological management of OA has been mainly symptomatic. However, in recent years, several randomised controlled studies have assessed the structure-modifying effect of glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate using plain radiography to measure joint space narrowing over years. There is some evidence to suggest a structure-modifying effect of glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate. On the basis of the results of recent randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses, we can conclude that glucosamine sulfate (but not glucosamine hydrochloride) and chondroitin sulfate have small-to-moderate symptomatic efficacy in OA, although this is still debated. With respect to the structure-modifying effect, there is compelling evidence that glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate may interfere with progression of OA. [less ▲]

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See detailIntermittent bisphosphonate therapy in postmenopausal osteoporosis - Progress to date
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Malaise, Olivier ULg; Neuprez, A. et al

in Drugs & Aging (2007), 24(5), 351-359

Bisphosphonates are the most widely prescribed drugs in osteoporosis today. They have unequivocally shown their ability to reduce fracture rate at the spine (alendronic acid, risedronic acid, ibandronic ... [more ▼]

Bisphosphonates are the most widely prescribed drugs in osteoporosis today. They have unequivocally shown their ability to reduce fracture rate at the spine (alendronic acid, risedronic acid, ibandronic acid) and at the hip (alendronic acid and risedronic acid). However, their dosage and administration procedures and the adverse reactions induced by their oral intake are responsible for low adherence. Therefore, intermittent regimens have been developed. Weekly alendronic acid and risedronic acid provide similar benefits, in terms of bone mineral density (BMD) and changes in biochemical markers, as those seen with their daily formulations. Ibandronic acid has been shown to reduce vertebral fractures when given intermittently. Ibandronic acid given orally monthly and intravenously every 2 or 3 months provides increases in BMD similar to the daily formulation. Yearly intravenous infusions of zoledronic acid are currently being evaluated for their ability to reduce fractures. If the efficacy and safety of bisphosphonates given at administration intervals longer than weekly are confirmed, this might significantly improve patient adherence and long-term outcomes of bisphosphonate treatment in postmenopausal osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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