References of "Down's Syndrome, Research and Practice : The Journal of the Sarah Duffen Centre"
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See detailLanguage in Ageing Persons with Down Syndrome
Rondal, Jean-Adolphe ULg; Comblain, Annick ULg

in Down's Syndrome, Research and Practice : The Journal of the Sarah Duffen Centre (2002), 8(1), 1-9

Several cross-sectional studies and one longitudinal study were conducted on the language abilities of various cohorts of persons with Down syndrome aged between 14 and 50 years. No significant difference ... [more ▼]

Several cross-sectional studies and one longitudinal study were conducted on the language abilities of various cohorts of persons with Down syndrome aged between 14 and 50 years. No significant difference was observed on any of the receptive and productive morphosyntactic and lexical measures used, suggesting no marked change in the language of these persons from adolescence onto late adulthood. Repeated measures of cerebral metabolic rate (CMR) for fluorodeoxyglucose using a Positron Emission Tomography were made over a 4-year interval with 7 participants with Down syndrome aged between 37 and 49 years. A gradual decrease in global CMR for both cerebral hemispheres and for each participant was documented. It was particularly marked for 3 participants. However, no language deterioration could be associated with their marked lowering in CMR. [less ▲]

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See detailThe relevance of a nonword repetition task to assess phonological short-term memory in individuals with Down syndrome
Comblain, Annick ULg

in Down's Syndrome, Research and Practice : The Journal of the Sarah Duffen Centre (1999), 6(2), 76-84

Phonological short-term memory capacity is generally measured with a word span task or a digit span task. Another way to measure it is to use a nonword repetition task. Gathercole and Adams (1993) claimed ... [more ▼]

Phonological short-term memory capacity is generally measured with a word span task or a digit span task. Another way to measure it is to use a nonword repetition task. Gathercole and Adams (1993) claimed that this procedure can be used with children as young as two-years old. It seems that in normally developing children the quality of nonword repetition is influenced both by the length of nonwords and by the degree of wordlikeness. Can the phonological short-term memory of individuals with Down syndrome be assessed with a nonword repetition task? In order to answer this question, we decided to replicate Gathercole and collaborators' experiments (1991,1993) but with individuals with Down syndrome. The quality of nonword repetition in individuals with Down syndrome is, as in normally developing children, influenced both by the length of nonwords and by their degree of wordlikeness. Furthermore, our results seem to confirm the hypothesis which states that nonwords are temporarily stored in the phonological short-term memory system. As this system has a limited capacity, both normally developing children and people with Down syndrome recall more short nonwords than long nonwords. In conclusion, nonword repetition is a reliable task with which to assess phonological short-term memory in individuals with Down syndrome as well as in normally developing children. [less ▲]

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See detailLanguage in adults with Down syndrome
Rondal, Jean-Adolphe ULg; Comblain, Annick ULg

in Down's Syndrome, Research and Practice : The Journal of the Sarah Duffen Centre (1996), 4(1), 3-14

In this paper, we will try to supply at least a partial answer to the three following questions. First, what language levels are reached by adults with Down syndrome? Second, is there progress in language ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we will try to supply at least a partial answer to the three following questions. First, what language levels are reached by adults with Down syndrome? Second, is there progress in language or some aspects of it beyond adolescence and during the adult years? This question is related to the issue of a critical period for language development raised by Eric Lenneberg (1967). Third, what is the effect of ageing on the language of persons with Down syndrome, including those who develop Alzheimer disease in old age? [less ▲]

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See detailWorking memory in Down's syndrome: Training the rehearsal strategy
Comblain, Annick ULg

in Down's Syndrome, Research and Practice : The Journal of the Sarah Duffen Centre (1994), 2(3), 123-126

This study reports on the verbal short term memory skills of individuals with Down's syndrome and on the possibility of increasing memory span durably by using a rehearsal strategy

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