References of "Domestic Animal Endocrinology"
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See detailMonitoring the circadian rhythm of serum and salivary cortisol concentrations in the horse
Bohak, Zs; Szabo, F.; Beckers, Jean-François ULg et al

in Domestic Animal Endocrinology (2013), 45(1), 38-42

Daily fluctuations of cortisol concentration in the blood or saliva have been repeatedly reported. However, several contradictions in the existing literature appear on this subject. The present study was ... [more ▼]

Daily fluctuations of cortisol concentration in the blood or saliva have been repeatedly reported. However, several contradictions in the existing literature appear on this subject. The present study was performed to definitively establish options for testing adrenocortical function. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate parallel circadian rhythms in salivary and serum cortisol concentrations during a 24-h period. Twenty horses were examined under the same conditions. Blood and saliva samples were taken every 2 h for 24 h to determine the daily changes in cortisol concentrations of saliva and serum at rest and to determine the relationship between salivary and serum cortisol levels. Cosinor analysis of group mean data confirmed a significant circadian component for both serum and salivary cortisol concentrations (P < 0.001 in both cases). The serum cortisol circadian rhythm had an acrophase at 10:50 AM (95% CI, 10:00 AM-11:40 AM), a MESOR of 22.67 ng/mL, and an amplitude of 11.93 ng/mL. The salivary cortisol circadian rhythm had an acrophase at 10:00 AM (95% CI, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM), a MESOR of 0.52 ng/mL, and an amplitude of 0.12 ng/mL. We found a significant but weak association between salivary and serum cortisol concentrations; the Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.32 (P < 0.001). The use of salivary cortisol level as an indicator of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity may be warranted. However, the salivary cortisol levels are more likely to be correlated with free plasma cortisol than with the total plasma cortisol concentration. [less ▲]

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See detailFactors affecting plasma prolactin concentrations throughout gestation in high producing dairy cows.
Garcia-Ispierto, I.; Lopez-Gatius, F.; Almeria, S. et al

in Domestic Animal Endocrinology (2009), 36(2), 57-66

The aim of the present study was to investigate possible relationships between plasma concentrations of prolactin and the following factors throughout gestation in lactating dairy cows: photoperiod ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study was to investigate possible relationships between plasma concentrations of prolactin and the following factors throughout gestation in lactating dairy cows: photoperiod, season, milk production, Neospora caninum-seropositivity, twin pregnancy, and plasma concentrations of pregnancy associated glycoproteins-1 (PAG-1), progesterone and cortisol. Pregnancy was diagnosed by trans-rectal ultrasonography on Day 40 post-insemination and by palpation per rectum on Days 90, 120, 150, 180 and 210 or until abortion in aborting cows. Blood samples were collected from each animal immediately before each pregnancy diagnosis. The study population was comprised of 73 non-aborting (54 Neospora-seropositive cows) and 20 aborting cows (all Neospora-seropositive) cows. In non-aborting cows, GLM repeated measures of analysis of variance revealed that lactation number and days in milk had no effect on plasma prolactin concentrations throughout gestation, whereas high plasma prolactin concentrations were significantly associated with high plasma levels of cortisol and PAG-1, with Neospora-seropositivity, positive photoperiod (increasing day length), twin pregnancy, and with low plasma progesterone concentrations. An interaction among plasma prolactin, plasma cortisol and milk production was observed in that plasma prolactin concentrations differed significantly throughout gestation and were highest in high-producing cows with high cortisol levels. In Neospora-seropositive non-aborting versus aborting cows, mean prolactin concentrations failed to differ on Days 40, 90, 120, 150 and 180 of pregnancy, whereas prolactin values were significantly lower (P=0.03) in aborting animals on Day 210 of pregnancy. Our results indicate that a positive photoperiod and Neospora-infection lead to increased plasma prolactin concentrations throughout gestation. Reduced prolactin concentrations detected in Neospora-seropositive aborting cows compared to non-aborting animals suggests a protective effect of prolactin in N. caninum infection. [less ▲]

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See detailMilk production correlates negatively with plasma levels of pregnancy-associated glycoprotein (PAG) during the early fetal period in high producing dairy cows with live fetuses
Lopez-Gatius, F.; Garbayo, J. M.; Santolaria, P. et al

in Domestic Animal Endocrinology (2007), 32(1), 29-42

This study was designed to establish possible factors affecting plasma pregnancy-associated glycoprotein (PAG) concentrations during early pregnancy in high producing dairy cows with live fetuses. Blood ... [more ▼]

This study was designed to establish possible factors affecting plasma pregnancy-associated glycoprotein (PAG) concentrations during early pregnancy in high producing dairy cows with live fetuses. Blood samples were obtained on days 35, 42, 49, 56 and 63 of gestation from 80 lactating cows in two herds carrying live fetuses. Radioimmunoassay systems were used to determine PAG (RIA-497 and RIA-706) and progesterone concentrations. We evaluated the effects on PAG concentrations of herd, lactation number, sire of fetus, day of gestation, fetus number, plasma progesterone and milk production at each time point established, along with possible paired interactions. Mean milk production per cow approached 41 kg during the study period. PAG concentrations were not affected by herd, lactation number or plasma progesterone concentration. Significant positive effects on PAG concentrations were shown by the gestation day, and the interaction between day of gestation and twin pregnancy. Significant differences between bulls and a significant negative correlation between milk production and PAG values on day 63 of pregnancy were also detected. Proportions of blood samples showing undetectable PAG levels and false negative diagnoses throughout the study period were significantly higher (P < 0.001) using the RIA-497 system (2.5% and 5.3%, respectively) compared to RIA-706 (0% and 0.8%, respectively). Our findings suggest that PAG concentrations during the early fetal period are related to the day of gestation, milk production, number of fetuses and sire of fetus in high producing dairy cows. Under our working conditions, the RIA-706 method was better at detecting plasma PAG molecules than the RIA-497 system. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neuroendocrinology of reproductive behavior in Japanese quail
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Baillien, Michelle; Charlier, Thierry ULg et al

in Domestic Animal Endocrinology (2003), 25

Sex steroid hormones such as testosterone have widespread effects on brain physiology and function but one of their best characterized effects arguably involves the activation of male sexual behavior ... [more ▼]

Sex steroid hormones such as testosterone have widespread effects on brain physiology and function but one of their best characterized effects arguably involves the activation of male sexual behavior. During the past 20 years we have investigated the testosterone control of male sexual behavior in an avian species, the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).We briefly reviewhere the main features and advantages of this species relating to the investigation of fundamental questions in the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology, a field that studies inter-relationship among hormones, brain and behavior. Special attention is given to the intracellular metabolism of testosterone, in particular its aromatization into an estrogen, which plays a critical limiting role in the mediation of the behavioral effects of testosterone. Brain aromatase activity is controlled by steroids which increase the transcription of the enzyme, but afferent inputs that affect the intraneuronal concentrations of calcium also appear to have a pronounced effect on the enzyme activity through rapid changes in its phosphorylation status. The physiological significance of these slowgenomic and rapid, presumably non-genomic, changes in brain aromatase activity are also briefly discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment and validation of a specific radioimmunoassay for equine osteocalcin
Carstanjen, Bianca; Sulon, Joseph ULg; Banga-Mboko, H. et al

in Domestic Animal Endocrinology (2003), 24(1), 31-41

This study describes for the first time the development and validation of a sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) for equine osteocalcin (OC) quantification using purified equine OC as standard ... [more ▼]

This study describes for the first time the development and validation of a sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) for equine osteocalcin (OC) quantification using purified equine OC as standard, tracer, and immunogen for antibody formation in rabbits. The assay allowed to measure equine serum OC levels with a sensitivity of 0.2 ng/mL. Immunoreactive serum OC values of clinically normal, different-aged horses ranged from 3.68 to 127.31 ng/mL. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CV) were 6.2 and 8.2%, respectively. Serial equine scrum sample dilutions were linear. The recovery of equine OC from equine serum samples ranged from 93.88 to 107.9%. There was a tight correlation between OC values measured with the equine- specific OC RIA and two commercially available bovine-specific OC RIA kits. However, highest serum OC values were obtained with the equine-specific OC RIA. In conclusion, our equine-specific OC RIA is sensitive, linear, accurate, precise, and reproducible. The assay allowed to quantify OC in equine serum samples and might, therefore, be used to monitor equine osteoblast activity associated with bone diseases, exercise, therapy forms or diet. [less ▲]

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See detailRole Of The Somatotropic Axis In The Mammalian Metabolism
Renaville, Robert ULg; Hammadi, M.; Portetelle, Daniel ULg

in Domestic Animal Endocrinology (2002), 23(1-2),

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See detailMechanisms of reduced and compensatory growth.
Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg; Van Eenaeme, Christian ULg; Gerard, O. et al

in Domestic Animal Endocrinology (2000), 19(2), 121-32

Growth is an integrated process, resulting from the response of cells dependent on the endocrine status and nutrient availability. During feed restriction, the production and secretion of growth hormone ... [more ▼]

Growth is an integrated process, resulting from the response of cells dependent on the endocrine status and nutrient availability. During feed restriction, the production and secretion of growth hormone (GH) by the pituitary gland are enhanced, but the number of GH receptors decreases. Changes of GH binding proteins induce GH resistance and are followed by reduced insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) secretion. On the other hand, high circulating levels of GH enhance the mobilization of fatty acids, which are used to support energy requirements. Thus, when feed restriction in growing animals is moderate, there is mainly protein but barely fat accretion. By contrast, a severe feed restriction enhances the release of catabolic hormones and stimulates, from muscle cells, the liberation of amino acids, which are used by hepatocytes for gluconeogenesis. During refeeding and compensatory growth, the secretion of insulin is sharply enhanced and plasma GH concentrations remain high. This situation probably allows more nutrients to be used for growth processes. The role of plasma IGF-I during compensatory growth is not clear and must be explained in connection with changes of its binding proteins. Thyroxin and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine seem to have a permissive effect on growth. The simultaneous occurrence of puberty with refeeding can exert a synergistic effect on growth. Initially, compensatory growth is characterized by the deposition of very lean tissue, similar as during feed restriction. This lasts for some weeks. Then, protein synthesis decreases and high feed intake leads to increased fat deposition. [less ▲]

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See detailFeed restriction in young bulls alters the onset of puberty in relationship with plasma insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding proteins.
Renaville, Robert ULg; Van Eenaeme, Christian ULg; Breier, B. H. et al

in Domestic Animal Endocrinology (2000), 18(2), 165-76

The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of feed restriction and re-alimentation on the onset of puberty and IGF status in peripubertal male calves and to compare the radioimmunoassay (RIA ... [more ▼]

The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of feed restriction and re-alimentation on the onset of puberty and IGF status in peripubertal male calves and to compare the radioimmunoassay (RIA) and western ligand blotting (WLB) methods for bovine IGFBP-2. Twelve prepubertal 290 d-old Belgian Blue bulls (mean weight: +/- 290 kg) were randomly assigned in three groups: a control group (NG; n = 4) receiving a classic fattening diet to induce "normal" growth (1.48 kg/d), a feed restricted group (RG; n = 4) to obtain reduced growth (0.50 kg/d) and, a severely restricted group (SG; n = 4) to nearly stop growth (0.08 kg/d). The feed restriction period was maintained over a period of 114 d. After the period of differential feeding, all animals received the control feed regime over a period of 100 d. Blood samples were collected at fortnightly intervals. Circulating IGF-I was measured by RIA whereas plasma IGFBPs was evaluated by WLB; IGFBP-2 was additionally quantified by RIA procedure. At the beginning of the trial, IGF-I levels were low (<100 ng/ml) and similar in the three groups in accordance with prepubertal status. In the NG group, a progressive rise in IGF-I was observed from Day 42 to Day 142 whereas in the RG and SG groups, IGF-I levels did not change until the experimental restriction period ended. The delay of the rise in plasma IGF-I was longer for the SG group, IGF-I remained low until 2 wk after the end of the period of restricted feeding. Surprisingly, although differences were detected for IGF-I levels between the three groups, the IGFBP-2 and -3 data, evaluated by WLB could only discriminate between NG and SG group and not between NG and RG. However, by using a RIA method, an IGFBP-2 decrease was observed in the NG group coincident with increasing IGF-I levels. For both RG and SG groups, IGFBP-2 levels remained high throughout the feed restriction period whereas plasma IGFBP-2 levels declined upon feeding in both groups. During this feed restriction period, IGFBP-2 was significantly lower in NG than in RG or SG groups. Moreover, SG group animals had higher levels in plasma IGFBP-2 than RG animals. In conclusion, puberty is characterized by developmental changes in plasma IGF-I and IGFBPs that were altered by feed restriction. Moreover, RIA evaluation of plasma IGFBP-2 is able to better reflect group differences than WLB. [less ▲]

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See detailCandidate gene markers associated with somatotropic axis and milk selection
Parmentier, I.; Portetelle, Daniel ULg; Gengler, Nicolas ULg et al

in Domestic Animal Endocrinology (1999), 17(2-3), 139-148

One of the obstacles to progress in dairy cattle selection is that milk production traits are only expressed after the first calving. However, the use of the quantitative trait loci (QTL) technology will ... [more ▼]

One of the obstacles to progress in dairy cattle selection is that milk production traits are only expressed after the first calving. However, the use of the quantitative trait loci (QTL) technology will improve the efficiency of dairy industry with a positive image for the consumers. QTL are part of the genome showing a preponderant action and explaining the major part of variation of the trait production. At the present time, the two major strategies developed to detect such QTL are the candidate gene approach and the positional genetics approach. The somatotropic axis contains the most promising candidates in this respect, as it strongly regulates milk production. Then, the identification of favorable QTL associated with the somatotropic axis that are significantly correlated with genetic merits for milk production could lead to more effective selection programs. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of growth hormone-binding protein in cattle plasma: prolactin-binding activity and 24-hour profile.
Massart, S.; Ban, A. M.; Renaville, Robert ULg et al

in Domestic Animal Endocrinology (1996), 13(1), 47-57

The purpose of this study was to characterize circulating growth hormone-binding proteins (GHBP) and prolactin-binding proteins (PRLBP) in cattle blood plasma. In particular, the 24-hr profile of these ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study was to characterize circulating growth hormone-binding proteins (GHBP) and prolactin-binding proteins (PRLBP) in cattle blood plasma. In particular, the 24-hr profile of these molecules was investigated. The preincubation of bull plasma with iodinated bovine growth hormone (bGH) or bovine prolactin (bPRL), followed by gel filtration chromatography (Superdex 200; 1.6 x 60 cm column), resulted in the formation of essentially two complexes. The majority of [125I]bPRL eluted with the first one (M(r) approximately 600 kDa), whereas [125I]bGH mainly appeared in the second one (M(r) approximately 70 kDa). The fractions corresponding to these two peaks were analyzed by western ligand blotting (WLB), under reducing conditions. WLB revealed, respectively, 190-, 56-, 52-, and 28-kDa bands for the first peak and only 52- and 28-kDa bands for the second one. The nature of the 600-kDa peak is at present undetermined, but the 70-kDa one was previously identified as high-affinity GHBP. Displacement studies demonstrated that bGH and bPRL were both able to bind to this GHBP, because the bGH- and bPRL-binding activities of this protein could be saturated by an excess of either of these two hormones. This was indirectly confirmed by the close correlation (r = 0.615; P = 0.0001; n = 155) observed between plasma bGH- and bPRL-binding activities, because this correlation could suggest that both ligands are bound to the same proteins. The temporal concentrations of plasma GHBP were measured in samples collected at 20-min intervals for 24 hr from 8 young bulls. The evaluation of GHBP was realized by WLB, followed by densitometric analysis. Some fluctuations were observed, but these were not correlated with bGH release, even with a +/- 2-hr lag period. In summary, we found that bovine high-affinity GHBP binds not only bGH, but also bPRL. A second type of protein, of higher molecular weight, also binds these two hormones, but further investigations are needed to determine its nature. Finally, GHBP concentrations in cattle blood plasma apparently show fluctuations over a 24-hr period, but no correlation was found between these fluctuations and plasma growth hormone concentrations. [less ▲]

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