References of "Diabètes & Métabolism"
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See detailFacteurs génétiques et risque de dysglycémie dans des familles de diabétiques de type 2: l’étude DESCENDANCE
Franc, S; Cauchi, S; Yengo, L et al

in Diabètes & Métabolism (2015, April), 41(s1), 10-35

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See detailRemboursement de la mesure continue du glucose en Belgique: un exemple de multidisciplinarité
RADERMECKER, Régis ULg; Contessi, El

in Diabètes & Métabolism (2015, March), 41

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See detailAnalyse rétrospective des données concernant les patientes avec diabète gestationnel au CHU de Liège
RADERMECKER, Régis ULg; PHILIPS, Jean-Christophe ULg; Sepulchre, E

in Diabètes & Métabolism (2015, March), 41

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See detailDifférences d’activité de l’inflammasome NLRP3 entre sujets obèses avec et sans anomalies métaboliques
Esser, Nathalie ULg; L'Homme, Laurent ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg et al

in Diabètes & Métabolism (2013, March), 39(suppl 1), 102

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See detailMesure continue du glucose et diabète gestationnel : revue des études disponibles
RADERMECKER, Régis ULg; Sepulchre, E

in Diabètes & Métabolism (2013, March), 39

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See detailMetformin revisited: A critical review of the benefit-risk balance in at-risk patients with type 2 diabetes.
SCHEEN, André ULg; Paquot, Nicolas ULg

in Diabètes & Métabolism (2013)

Metformin is unanimously considered a first-line glucose-lowering agent. Theoretically, however, it cannot be prescribed in a large proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes because of numerous ... [more ▼]

Metformin is unanimously considered a first-line glucose-lowering agent. Theoretically, however, it cannot be prescribed in a large proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes because of numerous contraindications that could lead to an increased risk of lactic acidosis. Various observational data from real-life have shown that many diabetic patients considered to be at risk still receive metformin and often without appropriate dose adjustment, yet apparently with no harm done and particularly no increased risk of lactic acidosis. More interestingly, recent data have suggested that type 2 diabetes patients considered at risk because of the presence of traditional contraindications may still derive benefit from metformin therapy with reductions in morbidity and mortality compared with other glucose-lowering agents, especially sulphonylureas. The present review analyzes the benefit-risk balance of metformin therapy in special populations, namely, patients with stable coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndrome or myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, renal impairment or chronic kidney disease, hepatic dysfunction and chronic respiratory insufficiency, all conditions that could in theory increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Special attention is also paid to elderly patients with type 2 diabetes, a population that is growing rapidly, as older patients can accumulate several comorbidities classically considered contraindications to the use of metformin. A review of the recent scientific literature suggests that reassessment of the contraindications of metformin is now urgently needed to prevent physicians from prescribing the most popular glucose-lowering therapy in everyday clinical practice outside of the official recommendations. [less ▲]

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See detailDiabète et Ramadan : représentations et pratiques de santé des patients et des soignants et intérêts de l'éducation thérapeutique du patient
Smaoui, N; Böhme, P; Collin, JF et al

in Diabètes & Métabolism (2012), 38(2), 47-48

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See detailCampagnes de sensibilisation au dépistage du diabète de type 2 dans les pharmacies. Comparaison de deux approches : glycémie capillaire et grille Findrisc
Böhme, P; Agrinier, N; Badia, M et al

in Diabètes & Métabolism (2012), 38(2), 7

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See detailVitamin D and type 2 diabetes mellitus: Where do we stand?
CAVALIER, Etienne ULg; DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; SOUBERBIELLE, J.-C. et al

in Diabètes & Métabolism (2011), 37(4), 265-72

AIMS: In-vitro and observational studies have established a link between vitamin D deficiency and different type 2 diabetes outcomes (insulin resistance, insulin secretion, glucose intolerance). Although ... [more ▼]

AIMS: In-vitro and observational studies have established a link between vitamin D deficiency and different type 2 diabetes outcomes (insulin resistance, insulin secretion, glucose intolerance). Although the number of randomized controlled trials vs placebo is small, vitamin D (VTD) has been shown to prevent increases in glucose concentration and insulin resistance, enhance insulin sensitivity and reduce systolic blood pressure in type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: In this review, we have focused on the potential mechanisms that might explain the association between VTD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We have also evaluated the different epidemiological and observational studies on the topic, as well as the various interventional studies. RESULTS: Although the in vitro studies appear to be promising in explaining the link between VTD metabolism and T2DM, the results of in vivo studies are conflicting. This could be related to differences in their methodological approaches. CONCLUSION: Although more studies are needed to confirm the role of VTD in the treatment of T2DM, there is nevertheless enough evidence at this time to suggest a need to maintain 25-OH vitamin D levels in T2DM patients around 30ng/mL over the course of a year. [less ▲]

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See detailHaemodynamic changes during a squat test, pulsatile stress and indices of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in patients with long-duration type 1 diabetes.
PHILIPS, Jean-Christophe ULg; MARCHAND, Monique ULg; SCHEEN, André ULg

in Diabètes & Métabolism (2011)

AIM: Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) and pulsatile stress are considered to be independent cardiovascular risk factors. This study compared haemodynamic changes during an active orthostatic test ... [more ▼]

AIM: Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) and pulsatile stress are considered to be independent cardiovascular risk factors. This study compared haemodynamic changes during an active orthostatic test in adult patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), using low versus high RR E/I ratios as a marker of CAN. METHODS: A total of 20 T1DM patients with low RR E/I ratios were compared with 20 T1DM patients with normal RR E/I ratios, matched for gender (1/1 ratio), age (mean: 46years) and diabetes duration (22-26years); 40 matched healthy subjects served as controls. All subjects were evaluated by continuous monitoring of arterial blood pressure (Finapres((R))) and heart rate using a standardized posture test (1-min standing, 1-min squatting, 1-min standing), thus allowing calculation of baroreflex gain. RESULTS: Compared with controls, T1DM patients showed lower RR E/I ratios, reduced baroreflex gains, higher pulsatile stress (pulse pressurexheart rate), greater squatting-induced pulse pressure rises, orthostatic hypotension and reduced reflex tachycardia. Compared with T1DM patients with preserved RR E/I ratios, T1DM patients with low RR E/I ratios showed reduced post-standing reflex tachycardia and baroreflex gain, and delayed blood pressure recovery, but no markers of increased pulsatile stress. Interestingly, decreased baroreflex gain was significantly associated with both pulsatile stress and microalbuminuria. CONCLUSION: The use of RR E/I ratios to separate T1DM patients allows the detection of other CAN markers during an orthostatic posture test, but with no significant differences in pulsatile stress or microalbuminuria. In this context, squatting-derived baroreflex gain appears to be more informative. [less ▲]

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See detailDPP-4 inhibitors in the management of type 2 diabetes: A critical review of head-to-head trials.
SCHEEN, André ULg

in Diabètes & Métabolism (2011)

Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors offer new options for the management of type 2 diabetes. Direct comparisons with active glucose-lowering comparators in drug-naive patients have demonstrated that ... [more ▼]

Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors offer new options for the management of type 2 diabetes. Direct comparisons with active glucose-lowering comparators in drug-naive patients have demonstrated that DPP-4 inhibitors exert slightly less pronounced HbA(1c) reduction than metformin (with the advantage of better gastrointestinal tolerability) and similar glucose-lowering effects as with a thiazolidinedione (TZD; with the advantage of no weight gain). In metformin-treated patients, gliptins were associated with similar HbA(1c) reductions compared with a sulphonylurea (SU; with the advantage of no weight gain, considerably fewer hypoglycaemic episodes and no need for titration) and a TZD (with the advantage of no weight gain and better overall tolerability). DPP-4 inhibitors also exert clinically relevant glucose-lowering effects compared with a placebo in patients treated with SU or TZD (of potential interest when metformin is either not tolerated or contraindicated), and as oral triple therapy with a good tolerability profile when added to a metformin-SU or pioglitazone-SU combination. Several clinical trials also showed a consistent reduction in HbA(1c) when DPP-4 inhibitors were added to basal insulin therapy, with no increased risk of hypoglycaemia. Because of the complex pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes and the complementary actions of glucose-lowering agents, initial combination of a DPP-4 inhibitor with either metformin or a glitazone may be applied in drug-naive patients, resulting in greater efficacy and similar safety compared with either drug as monotherapy. However, DPP-4 inhibitors were less effective than GLP-1 receptor agonists for reducing HbA(1c) and body weight, but offer the advantage of being easier to use (oral instead of injected administration) and lower in cost. Only one head-to-head trial demonstrated the non-inferiority of saxagliptin vs sitagliptin. Clearly, more trials of direct comparisons between different incretin-based therapies are needed. Because of their pharmacokinetic characteristics, pharmacodynamic properties (glucose-dependent glucose-lowering effect) and good overall tolerability profile, DPP-4 inhibitors may have a key role to play in patients with renal impairment and in the elderly. The role of DPP-4 inhibitors in the therapeutic armamentarium of type 2 diabetes is rapidly evolving as their potential strengths and weaknesses become better defined mainly through controlled clinical trials. [less ▲]

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