References of "Dementia & Geriatric Cognitive Disorders"
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See detailRelationship between quality of life and cognitive decline in dementia
Missotten, Pierre ULg; Squelard, Gilles ULg; Ylieff, Michel ULg et al

in Dementia & Geriatric Cognitive Disorders (2008), 25(6), 564-572

Aims: We aimed to examine the association of cognitive decline with quality of life (QoL) in dementia compared to controls and to determine variables associated with QoL. Methods: Every subject was placed ... [more ▼]

Aims: We aimed to examine the association of cognitive decline with quality of life (QoL) in dementia compared to controls and to determine variables associated with QoL. Methods: Every subject was placed within a specific group depending on their designation by the Mini Mental State Examination and evaluated by the Alzheimer’s Disease Related Quality of Life (ADRQL) and clinical assessments. Results: QoL for the mild dementia group was lower (p = 0.08) than that of controls. The very severe dementia group had a significantly lower QoL than the other dementia groups, which all had similar ADRQL scores. The only predictor of ADRQL scores was found to be the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. Conclusion: There is no direct relationship between cognitive decline and QoL. [less ▲]

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See detailConsistency of Neuropsychiatric Syndromes across Dementias: Results from the European Alzheimer Disease Consortium
Aalten, Pauline; Verhey, Frans R. J.; Boziki, Marina et al

in Dementia & Geriatric Cognitive Disorders (2008), 25(1), 1-8

Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the consistency of neuropsychiatric subsyndromes of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory across several clinical and demographic subgroups ( e. g ... [more ▼]

Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the consistency of neuropsychiatric subsyndromes of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory across several clinical and demographic subgroups ( e. g. dementia subtypes, dementia severity, medication use, age and gender) in a large sample of outpatients with dementia. Methods: Cross-sectional data of 2,808 patients with dementia from 12 centres from the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium were collected. Principal component analysis was used for factor analysis. Subanalyses were performed for dementia subtypes, dementia severity, medication use, age and gender. Results: The results showed the relatively consistent presence of the 4 neuropsychiatric subsyndromes `hyperactivity', `psychosis', `affective symptoms' and `apathy' across the subanalyses. The factor structure was not dependent on dementia subtypes, age and gender but was dependent on dementia severity and cholinesterase use. The factors hyperactivity and affective symptoms were present in all subanalyses, but the presence of the factors apathy and psychosis was dependent on use of cholinesterase inhibitors and dementia severity, respectively. Conclusion: The present study provided evidence of the relative consistency of neuropsychiatric subsyndromes across dementia subtypes, age and gender, thereby stressing the importance of thinking about neuropsychiatric subsyndromes instead of separate symptoms. However, the subsyndromes apathy and psychosis were dependent on use of cholinesterase inhibitors and dementia severity. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuropsychiatric syndromes in dementia - Results from the European Alzheimer Disease Consortium: Part I
Aalten, Pauline; Verhey, Frans R. J.; Boziki, Marina et al

in Dementia & Geriatric Cognitive Disorders (2007), 24(6), 457-463

Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to identify neuropsychiatric subsyndromes of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory in a large sample of outpatients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: Cross ... [more ▼]

Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to identify neuropsychiatric subsyndromes of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory in a large sample of outpatients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: Cross-sectional data of 2,354 patients with AD from 12 centres from the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium were collected. Principal component analysis was used for factor analysis. Results: The results showed the presence of 4 neuropsychiatric subsyndromes: hyperactivity, psychosis, affective symptoms and apathy. The subsyndrome apathy was the most common, occurring in almost 65% of the patients. Conclusion: This large study has provided additional robust evidence for the existence of neuropsychiatric subsyndromes in AD. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel. [less ▲]

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See detailOrbitofrontal dysfunction related to both apathy and disinhibition in frontotemporal dementia
Peters, Frederic; Perani, Daniela; Herholz, Karl et al

in Dementia & Geriatric Cognitive Disorders (2006), 21(5-6), 373-379

Orbitofrontal metabolic impairment is characteristic of the frontal variant of frontotemporal dementia (fv-FTD), as are early changes in emotional and social conduct. Two main types of behavioral ... [more ▼]

Orbitofrontal metabolic impairment is characteristic of the frontal variant of frontotemporal dementia (fv-FTD), as are early changes in emotional and social conduct. Two main types of behavioral disturbances have been distinguished in fv-FTD patients: apathetic and disinhibited manifestations. In this study, we searched for relationships between brain metabolism and presence of apathetic or disinhibited behavior. Metabolic activity and behavioral data were collected in 41 fv-FTD patients from European PET centers. A conjunction analysis of the PET data showed an expected impairment of metabolic activity in the anterior cingulate, ventromedial and orbital prefrontal cortex, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the left anterior insula in fv-FTD subjects compared to matched controls. A correlation was observed between disinhibition scores on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory scale and a cluster of voxels located in the posterior orbitofrontal cortex ( 6, 28, - 24). Comparison of brain activity between apathetic and nonapathetic fv-FTD patients from two centers also revealed a specific involvement of the posterior orbitofrontal cortex in apathetic subjects ( 4, 22, - 22). The results confirm that the main cerebral metabolic impairment in fv-FTD patients affects areas specializing in emotional evaluation and demonstrate that decreased orbitofrontal activity is related to both disinhibited and apathetic syndromes in fv-FTD. Copyright (C) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel. [less ▲]

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See detailAnosognosia in very mild Alzheimer's disease but not in mild cognitive impairment
Kalbe, E.; Salmon, Eric ULg; Perani, D. et al

in Dementia & Geriatric Cognitive Disorders (2005), 19(5-6), 349-356

Objective: To study awareness of cognitive dysfunction in patients with very mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) and subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: A complaint interview covering 13 ... [more ▼]

Objective: To study awareness of cognitive dysfunction in patients with very mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) and subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: A complaint interview covering 13 cognitive domains was administered to 82 AD and 79 MCI patients and their caregivers. The patient groups were comparable according to age and education, and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores were ≥ 24 in all cases. The discrepancy between the patients' and caregivers' estimations of impairments was taken as a measure of anosognosia. Results: Self-reports of cognitive difficulties were comparable for AD and MCI patients. However, while in comparison to caregivers MCI patients reported significantly more cognitive impairment (p < 0.05), AD patients complained significantly less cognitive dysfunctions (p < 0.001). Conclusions: While most MCI patients tend to overestimate cognitive deficits when compared to their caregiver's assessment, AD patients in early stages of disease underestimate cognitive dysfunctions. Anosognosia can thus be regarded as a characteristic symptom at a stage of very mild AD (MMSE ≥ 24) but not MCI. Accordingly, medical history even in mildly affected patients should always include information from both patient and caregiver. Copyright (C) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel. [less ▲]

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See detailImpairment of neocortical metabolism predicts progression in Alzheimer's disease
Herholz, K.; Nordberg, A.; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Dementia & Geriatric Cognitive Disorders (1999), 10(6), 494-504

Studied prediction of progression rates of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in a prospective multicenter cohort study of 186 patients (mean age 63.2 yrs) with possible or probable AD, mostly with presenile onset ... [more ▼]

Studied prediction of progression rates of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in a prospective multicenter cohort study of 186 patients (mean age 63.2 yrs) with possible or probable AD, mostly with presenile onset. In a cross-sectional analysis at entry, impairment of glucose metabolism in temporoparietal or frontal association areas measured with positron emission tomography was significantly associated with dementia severity, clinical classification as possible vs probable AD, presence of multiple cognitive deficits and history of progression. A prospective longitudinal analysis showed a significant association between initial metabolic impairment and subsequent clinical deterioration. In patients with mild cognitive deficits at entry, the risk of deterioration was up to 4.7 times higher if the metabolism was severely impaired than with mild or absent metabolic impairment. [less ▲]

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