References of "Current Biology"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSpontaneous brain rhythms predict sleep stability in the face of noise
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; McKinney, Scott; Buxton, Orfeu et al

in Current Biology (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDaytime light exposure dynamically enhances brain responses.
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in Current Biology (2006), 16(16), 1616-21

In humans, light enhances both alertness and performance during nighttime and daytime [1-4] and influences regional brain function [5]. These effects do not correspond to classical visual responses but ... [more ▼]

In humans, light enhances both alertness and performance during nighttime and daytime [1-4] and influences regional brain function [5]. These effects do not correspond to classical visual responses but involve a non-image forming (NIF) system, which elicits greater endocrine, physiological, neurophysiological, and behavioral responses to shorter light wavelengths than to wavelengths geared toward the visual system [6-11]. During daytime, the neural changes induced by light exposure, and their time courses, are largely unknown. With functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we characterized the neural correlates of the alerting effect of daytime light by assessing the responses to an auditory oddball task [12-15], before and after a short exposure to a bright white light. Light-induced improvement in subjective alertness was linearly related to responses in the posterior thalamus. In addition, light enhanced responses in a set of cortical areas supporting attentional oddball effects, and it prevented decreases of activity otherwise observed during continuous darkness. Responses to light were remarkably dynamic. They declined within minutes after the end of the light stimulus, following various region-specific time courses. These findings suggest that light can modulate activity of subcortical structures involved in alertness, thereby dynamically promoting cortical activity in networks involved in ongoing nonvisual cognitive processes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSymbiotic leghemoglobins are crucial for nitrogen fixation in legume root nodules but not for general plant growth and development.
Ott, Thomas; van Dongen, Joost T; Gunther, Catrin et al

in Current Biology (2005), 15(6), 531-5

Hemoglobins are ubiquitous in nature and among the best-characterized proteins. Genetics has revealed crucial roles for human hemoglobins, but similar data are lacking for plants. Plants contain symbiotic ... [more ▼]

Hemoglobins are ubiquitous in nature and among the best-characterized proteins. Genetics has revealed crucial roles for human hemoglobins, but similar data are lacking for plants. Plants contain symbiotic and nonsymbiotic hemoglobins; the former are thought to be important for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF). In legumes, SNF occurs in specialized organs, called nodules, which contain millions of nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, called bacteroids. The induction of nodule-specific plant genes, including those encoding symbiotic leghemoglobins (Lb), accompanies nodule development. Leghemoglobins accumulate to millimolar concentrations in the cytoplasm of infected plant cells prior to nitrogen fixation and are thought to buffer free oxygen in the nanomolar range, avoiding inactivation of oxygen-labile nitrogenase while maintaining high oxygen flux for respiration. Although widely accepted, this hypothesis has never been tested in planta. Using RNAi, we abolished symbiotic leghemoglobin synthesis in nodules of the model legume Lotus japonicus. This caused an increase in nodule free oxygen, a decrease in the ATP/ADP ratio, loss of bacterial nitrogenase protein, and absence of SNF. However, LbRNAi plants grew normally when fertilized with mineral nitrogen. These data indicate roles for leghemoglobins in oxygen transport and buffering and prove for the first time that plant hemoglobins are crucial for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEctopic expression of DLK1 protein in skeletal muscle of padumnal heterozygotes causes the callipyge phenotype
Davis, Erica; Jensen, C.; Schroder, H. D. et al

in Current Biology (2004), 14(20), 1858-1862

The callipyge (CLPG) phenotype is an inherited skeletal muscle hypertrophy described in sheep. It is characterized by an unusual mode of inheritance ("polar overdominance") in which only heterozygous ... [more ▼]

The callipyge (CLPG) phenotype is an inherited skeletal muscle hypertrophy described in sheep. It is characterized by an unusual mode of inheritance ("polar overdominance") in which only heterozygous individuals having received the CLPG mutation from their father (+(MAT)/CLPG(PAT)) express the phenotype . +(MAT)/CLPG(PAT) individuals are born normal and develop the muscular hypertrophy at approximately 1 month of age. The CLPG mutation was identified as an A to G transition in a highly conserved dodecamer motif located between the imprinted DLK1 and GTL2 genes . This motif is thought to be part of a long-range control element (LRCE) because the CLPG mutation was shown, in postnatal skeletal muscle, to enhance the transcript levels of the DLK1, PEG11, GTL2, and MEG8 genes in cis without altering their imprinting status . As a result, the +(MAT)/CLPG(PAT) individuals have a unique expression profile thought to underlie the callipyge phenotype: an overexpression of the paternally expressed protein encoding DLK1 (Figure 1A) and PEG11 transcripts in the absence of an overexpression of the maternally expressed noncoding GTL2 and MEG8 transcripts . However, the way in which this distinct expression profile causes the callipyge muscular hypertrophy has remained unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that the callipyge phenotype is perfectly correlated with ectopic expression of DLK1 protein in hypertrophied muscle of +(MAT)/CLPG(PAT) sheep. We demonstrate the causality of this association by inducing a generalized muscular hypertrophy in transgenic mice that express DLK1 in skeletal muscle. The absence of DLK1 protein in skeletal muscle of CLPG/CLPG animals, despite the presence of DLK1 mRNA, supports a trans inhibition mediated by noncoding RNAs expressed from the maternal allele. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNonvisual responses to light exposure in the human brain during the circadian night
Perrin, Fabien; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Fuchs, Sonia ULg et al

in Current Biology (2004), 14(20), 1842-6

The brain processes light information to visually represent the environment but also to detect changes in ambient light level. The latter information induces non-image-forming responses and exerts ... [more ▼]

The brain processes light information to visually represent the environment but also to detect changes in ambient light level. The latter information induces non-image-forming responses and exerts powerful effects on physiology such as synchronization of the circadian clock and suppression of melatonin. In rodents, irradiance information is transduced from a discrete subset of photosensitive retinal ganglion cells via the retinohypothalamic tract to various hypothalamic and brainstem regulatory structures including the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei, the master circadian pacemaker. In humans, light also acutely modulates alertness, but the cerebral correlates of this effect are unknown. We assessed regional cerebral blood flow in 13 subjects attending to auditory and visual stimuli in near darkness following light exposures (>8000 lux) of different durations (0.5, 17, 16.5, and 0 min) during the biological night. The bright broadband polychromatic light suppressed melatonin and enhanced alertness. Functional imaging revealed that a large-scale occipito-parietal attention network, including the right intraparietal sulcus, was more active in proportion to the duration of light exposures preceding the scans. Activity in the hypothalamus decreased in proportion to previous illumination. These findings have important implications for understanding the effects of light on human behavior. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEnhancement of MSH2-MSH3-mediated mismatch repair recognition by the yeast MLH1-PMS1 complex
Habraken, Yvette ULg; Sung, Patrick; Prakash, Louise et al

in Current Biology (1997), 7(10), 790-3

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBinding of insertion/deletion DNA mismatches by the heterodimer of yeast mismatch repair protein MSH2 and MSH3
Habraken, Yvette ULg; Sung, Patrick; Prakash, Louise et al

in Current Biology (1996), 6(9), 1185-7

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)