References of "Behavioral Neuroscience"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIs sexual motivational state linked to dopamine release in the medial preoptic area?
Kleitz-Nelson, Hayley; Dominguez, Juan; Cornil, Charlotte ULg et al

in Behavioral Neuroscience (2010)

The medial preoptic area (mPOA) is a key site for the dopaminergic enhancement of male sexual behavior. Dopamine release increases in the rat mPOA with mating, supporting the critical stimulatory role ... [more ▼]

The medial preoptic area (mPOA) is a key site for the dopaminergic enhancement of male sexual behavior. Dopamine release increases in the rat mPOA with mating, supporting the critical stimulatory role played by preoptic dopamine on male sexual behavior. However, it has been questioned whether dopamine is specifically related to the occurrence of male sexual behavior and not simply involved in general arousal. To address this question, we ask whether dopamine release in the mPOA is linked to the production of male sexual behavior in Japanese quail, a species that exhibits a much shorter temporal pattern of copulation than rats and does not have an intromittent organ, resulting in a very different topography of their sexual response. Extracellular samples from the mPOA of adult sexually experienced male quail were collected every six minutes before, during, and after exposure to a female using in vivo microdialysis and analyzed using HPLC-EC. Extracellular dopamine significantly increased in the presence of a female and returned to baseline after removal of the female. However, subjects who failed to copulate did not display this increased release. These findings indicate that it is not solely the presence of a female that drives dopamine release in males, but how a male responds to her. Further, in subjects that copulated, dopamine release did not change in samples collected during periods of no copulation. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that dopamine action in the mPOA is specifically linked to sexual motivation and not only copulatory behavior or physical arousal. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDay-by-day maturation of the long-term expression of cocaine sensitization acquired before weaning in the rat
Tirelli, Ezio ULg

in Behavioral Neuroscience (2001), 115(5), 1101-1110

This study aimed to identify the ontogenetic period during which long-term expression of behavioral sensitization to cocaine begins to emerge. Rat pups aged 4, 8, 12, or 16 days received a pretreatment of ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to identify the ontogenetic period during which long-term expression of behavioral sensitization to cocaine begins to emerge. Rat pups aged 4, 8, 12, or 16 days received a pretreatment of 4 daily injections of 15 mg/kg sc cocaine paired with the test chamber for 45 min. Pups were then tested for sensitization in that context after abstinence intervals ranging from 2 to 10 days. On test days, pups were videotaped, and their behavior was scored later. Sensitization was detected after intervals of 2, 4, 5, or 9 days in pups aged 4-7, 8-11, 12-15, or 16-19 days during pretreatment, respectively. These results suggest that the mechanisms for long-term retention of sensitization mature incrementally in the rat, starting to emerge gradually after the I st week of age, whereas those relevant to short-term retention and initiation of sensitization are present earlier. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailConditioning of and contextual sensitization to apomorphine-induced climbing in mice : evidence against the habitation hypothesis
Tirelli, Ezio ULg; Heidbreder, C.

in Behavioral Neuroscience (1999), 113(2), 368-376

Several predictions of the habituation hypothesis of conditioned drug effects were tested by looking at contextual sensitization to apomorphine-induced climbing in mice (Mus musculus). Mice were first ... [more ▼]

Several predictions of the habituation hypothesis of conditioned drug effects were tested by looking at contextual sensitization to apomorphine-induced climbing in mice (Mus musculus). Mice were first sensitized to that effect after 9 daily injections of 0.4 mg/kg apomorphine in the test context. Other mice received the same treatment outside the test context. On Day 10, all mice were challenged with either saline (conditioned drug effects test) or apomorphine (contextual sensitization test). On both tests, the levels of climbing of mice that received apomorphine paired with the test context during the intermittent treatment were significantly higher than those of mice that were experiencing the test context for the first time (unexposed mice). Also, the rate of extinction in conditioned mice did not parallel the rate of habituation in the unexposed mice. Results contradict the habituation hypothesis of conditioned drug effects and contextual sensitization. ((c) 1999 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)(journal abstract) [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSystemic and Intracerebroventricular Injections of Vasotocin Inhibit Appetitive and Consummatory Components of Male Sexual Behavior in Japanese Quail
Castagna, C.; Absil, Philippe ULg; Foidart, Agnès ULg et al

in Behavioral Neuroscience (1998), 112(1), 233-50

The authors investigated the behavioral actions of vasotocin (VT) in castrated testosterone-treated male Japanese quail. The appetitive and consummatory components of sexual behavior as well as the ... [more ▼]

The authors investigated the behavioral actions of vasotocin (VT) in castrated testosterone-treated male Japanese quail. The appetitive and consummatory components of sexual behavior as well as the occurrence frequency of crows were inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, by injections of VT. The authors observed opposite effects after injection of the V1 receptor antagonist, dPTyr(Me)AVP. Lower doses of VT were more active after central than after systemic injection, and effects of systemic injections of VT were blocked by a central injection of dPTyr(Me)AVP. The behavioral inhibition was associated with a modified diuresis after systemic but not central injection. These results provide direct evidence that VT affects male sexual behavior in quail by a direct action on the brain independent of its peripheral action on diuresis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAromatase Inhibition Blocks the Activation and Sexual Differentiation of Appetitive Male Sexual Behavior in Japanese Quail
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Castagna, C.; Ball, G. F.

in Behavioral Neuroscience (1997), 111(2), 381-97

Two experiments investigated the role of estrogens in the activation and sexual differentiation of appetitive sexual behavior (ASB) in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) as measured by a learned social ... [more ▼]

Two experiments investigated the role of estrogens in the activation and sexual differentiation of appetitive sexual behavior (ASB) in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) as measured by a learned social proximity response. Injection of the aromatase inhibitor R767 13 in castrated, testosterone (T)-treated male quail completely suppressed ASB, confirming that, like consummatory sexual behavior, ASB is mediated by T aromatization. ASB is not observed in female quail, even if they are treated with T as adults. The role of embryonic estrogens in the sexual differentiation of ASB was tested by blocking estrogen synthesis in ovo. Control male and T-treated female quail deprived of estrogens during embryonic life learned the social proximity response used to assess ASB, whereas control female quail did not, despite the presence of high T. Thus, ASB is demasculinized by the action of embryonic estrogens during ontogeny as is consummatory behavior. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAppetitive as Well as Consummatory Aspects of Male Sexual Behavior in Quail Are Activated by Androgens and Estrogens
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Reid, J.; Absil, Philippe ULg et al

in Behavioral Neuroscience (1995), 109(3), 485-501

Appetitive male sexual behavior was measured in male quail with the use of a learned social proximity procedure that quantified the time spent by a male in front of a window providing a view of a female ... [more ▼]

Appetitive male sexual behavior was measured in male quail with the use of a learned social proximity procedure that quantified the time spent by a male in front of a window providing a view of a female that was subsequently released into the cage, providing an opportunity for copulation. The learned response is not acquired by castrated males but can be acquired when castrates are treated with testosterone (T) or with the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol or with the endogenous estrogen 17 beta-estradiol. Only birds that become sexually active acquire the response. Conversely, birds in which the consummatory copulatory behavior is disrupted by treatment with the antiestrogen tamoxifen lose the anticipatory response. These results demonstrate that appetitive sexual behavior is, like copulation, activated by T and by estrogens. This suggests that intracerebral aromatization of T also plays a critical role in the activation of this behavior. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailOrganization of partner preference and sexual behavior and its nocturnal rhythmicity in male rats.
Bakker, Julie ULg; van Ophemert, J.; Slob, A. K.

in Behavioral Neuroscience (1993), 107(6), 1049-58

Male rats were neonatally treated with 1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione (ATD), which blocks aromatization of testosterone (T) to estradiol (E2), from Days 0, 2, or 5 through 14. Adult partner preference ... [more ▼]

Male rats were neonatally treated with 1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione (ATD), which blocks aromatization of testosterone (T) to estradiol (E2), from Days 0, 2, or 5 through 14. Adult partner preference behavior (PPB; choice between estrous female rat [F] and active male rat [M]) was studied in the early part of the dark phase of the light-dark (LD) cycle. ATD Day 0 Ms showed a preference for the stimulus M or showed no preference for either of the stimulus Ss. Controls preferred the estrous F. ATD Days 2 and 5 Ms showed PPB intermediate between ATD Day 0 Ms and controls. Thus the neonatally sensitive period for organization of adult PPB extends beyond Day 5. Furthermore, PPB showed a nocturnal rhythmicity in ATD Ms but not in controls. In the late part of the dark phase, all Ms showed a preference for the stimulus F. ATD Days 2 and 5 Ms and control Ms were no longer different in PPB, but ATD Day 0 Ms still showed significantly lower preference scores for F than all other Ms. Thus the E2 metabolite of T suppresses organization of an adult nocturnal rhythm in PPB. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHormonal regulation of adult partner preference behavior in neonatally ATD-treated male rats.
Bakker, Julie ULg; Brand, T.; van Ophemert, J. et al

in Behavioral Neuroscience (1993), 107(3), 480-7

Male rats, neonatally treated with ATD (1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione), which blocks the aromatization of testosterone into estradiol (E2), were tested for adult partner preference behavior (PPB ... [more ▼]

Male rats, neonatally treated with ATD (1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione), which blocks the aromatization of testosterone into estradiol (E2), were tested for adult partner preference behavior (PPB; estrous female vs. active male). Castration caused a decrease in preference for the female partner in all males, with ATD males showing lower preference for the female partner than controls. Long-term castrated males did not show preference for either partner. Precastration levels of PPB in control males occurred after treatment with E2 or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) plus E2. DHT alone had no effect on PPB. With E2 alone, the ATD males clearly preferred the male partner. When DHT was added, these ATD males showed no preference for either partner or a low preference for the female partner. In conclusion, adult PPB in male rats is activated by endogenous testosterone or by both its metabolites (DHT and E2) or by E2 alone. ATD males showed a much lower preference for the female. There was a differential effect of DHT and E2: DHT had no effect, but E2 clearly caused ATD males to prefer the male partner and control males to prefer the female partner. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)