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See detailAutoimmune syndrome after neonatal induction of tolerance to alloantigens: analysis of the specificity and of the cellular and genetic origin of autoantibodies
Schurmans, Stéphane ULg; Merino, J.; Qin, H. et al

in Autoimmunity (1991), 9

BALB/c mice neonatally injected with 10(8) semiallogeneic (C57BL/6 x BALB/c)F1 spleen cells become tolerant to the H-2b alloantigens, but also develop a wide range of autoimmune manifestations ... [more ▼]

BALB/c mice neonatally injected with 10(8) semiallogeneic (C57BL/6 x BALB/c)F1 spleen cells become tolerant to the H-2b alloantigens, but also develop a wide range of autoimmune manifestations characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Indeed, in these mice, the presence of a hypergammaglobulinaemia, autoantibodies--including anti-ssDNA, anti-platelet, thymocytotoxic and rheumatoid factor antibodies--circulating immune complexes, cryoglobulins as well as renal glomerular deposition of immunoglobulins have been observed. In this study, we have shown that the allogenic effect and B cell chimaerism which characterize these F1 cell-injected mice is associated with the expression of a large spectrum of autoantibodies, including anti-ssDNA and anti-cytoskeleton antibodies, and that these autoantibodies are not multispecific. We took advantage of the fact that, in this model, autoantibodies are exclusively produced by F1 donor B cells to inject newborn BALB/c mice with F1 Xid spleen cells lacking the CD5+ B cell subset. Injection of 2 x 10(8) F1 Xid spleen cells triggers the production of anti-ssDNA as well as anti-BrMRBC antibodies, and these mice developed tissue lesions. Finally, analysis of the VH gene family expressed by monoclonal autoantibodies derived from F1 cell-injected mice showed that they used the 2 largest families J558 and 7183. These results suggest that the allogenic effect and B cell chimerism which characterize the neonatal induction of tolerance to MHC alloantigens is associated with the selective triggering of autoreactive B cells producing monospecific IgG autoantibodies. They also imply that upon stimulation by persisting alloreactive CD4+ T cells, either CD5- B cells are able to produce autoantibodies or autoantibody-producing CD5+ B cells can differentiate from Xid spleen cells [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of anti-DNA clonotypes and the role of helper T-lymphocytes during the autoimmune response in mice tolerant to alloantigens
Stott, D.; Merino, J.; Schurmans, Stéphane ULg et al

in Autoimmunity (1988), 1(4), 253-266

BALB/c mice neonatally injected with semiallogeneic (C57BL/6 x BALB/c) F1 spleen cells become tolerant to C57BL/6 alloantigens and exhibit chimaerism due to persistence of F1 lymphocytes. Such mouse ... [more ▼]

BALB/c mice neonatally injected with semiallogeneic (C57BL/6 x BALB/c) F1 spleen cells become tolerant to C57BL/6 alloantigens and exhibit chimaerism due to persistence of F1 lymphocytes. Such mouse chimaeras develop an autoimmune (lupus-like) disease characterised by hypergammaglobulinaemia with production of autoantibodies against DNA, Sm antigen and other self-antigens characteristic of SLE in addition to circulating immune complexes and glomerular deposition of immunoglobulins. We have studied the autoimmune response by analysing the isoelectric focusing (IEF)+ patterns (spectrotypes) of anti-ss and anti-dsDNA antibodies produced by these animals. The results show that the anti-DNA response is remarkably restricted, only a very small number of lymphoid cell clones responding in the majority of animals. The behaviour of these clones has been followed during the development of the autoimmune response by analysis of their individual IEF patterns (clonotypes). The first appearance of clones secreting anti-DNA autoantibodies was observed in 3-4 week old mice. Changes in spectrotype occurred during the course of the response but they remained restricted to a very small number of clones in almost all the animals studied. Changes in clonotype consistent with somatic mutation in committed, anti-DNA-secreting clones were also observed. Helper T-lymphocytes of host origin are shown to be required for the development of an autoimmune response [less ▲]

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