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See detailVertical canopy gradient in photosynthesis and monoterpenoid emissions: An insight into the chemistry and physiology behind
Simpraga, M.; Verbeeck, H.; Bloemen, J. et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2013), 80

It is well known that vertical canopy gradients and varying sky conditions influence photosynthesis (Pn), specific leaf area (SLA), leaf thickness (LT) and leaf pigments (lutein, â-carotene and ... [more ▼]

It is well known that vertical canopy gradients and varying sky conditions influence photosynthesis (Pn), specific leaf area (SLA), leaf thickness (LT) and leaf pigments (lutein, â-carotene and chlorophyll). In contrast, little is known about these effects on monoterpenoid (MT) emissions. Our study examines simultaneously measured Pn, MT emissions and the MT/Pn ratio along the canopy of an adult European beech tree (Fagus sylvatica L.) in natural forest conditions. Dynamic branch enclosure systems were used at four heights in the canopy (7, 14, 21 and 25 m) in order to establish relationships and better understand the interaction between Pn and MT emissions under both sunny and cloudy sky conditions. Clear differences in Pn, MT emissions and the MT/Pn ratio were detected within the canopy. The highest Pn rates were observed in the sun leaves at 25 m due to the higher intercepted light levels, whereas MT emissions (and the MT/Pn ratio) were unexpectedly highest in the semi-shaded leaves at 21 m. The higher Pn rates and, apparently contradictory, lower MT emissions in the sun leaves may be explained by the hypothesis of Owen and Peñuelas (2005), stating synthesis of more photo-protective carotenoids may decrease the emissions of volatile isoprenoids (including MTs) because they both share the same biochemical precursors. In addition, leaf traits like SLA, LT and leaf pigments clearly differed with height in the canopy, suggesting that the leaf’s physiological status cannot be neglected in future research on biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) when aiming at developing new and/or improved emission algorithms. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of diffuse light on isoprene and monoterpene emissions from a mixed temperate forest
Laffineur, Quentin ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Schoon, Niels et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2013), 46(74), 385-392

This study investigated the impact of diffuse light on canopy scale emission of isoprene and monoterpenes measured continuously above a mixed temperate forest, using the disjunct eddy-covariance by mass ... [more ▼]

This study investigated the impact of diffuse light on canopy scale emission of isoprene and monoterpenes measured continuously above a mixed temperate forest, using the disjunct eddy-covariance by mass scanning technique with a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) instrument. To assess this impact, the relationship between emissions/radiation and emissions/gross primary production (GPP) under clear sky and cloudy conditions were analysed. Under cloudy conditions (high proportion of diffuse radiation), the isoprene and monoterpene fluxes were enhanced compared to clear sky conditions (low proportion of diffuse radiation) at equivalent temperature and above-canopy total radiation. The whole-canopy enzymatic activity of the metabolic isoprene production pathway, however, was suggested to be lower under cloudy conditions than under clear sky conditions at equivalent temperature. The mechanisms behind these observations are probably linked to the better penetration of diffuse radiation in the canopy. Shade leaves/needles receive more radiation in cloudy conditions than in clear sky conditions, thereby inducing the observed effects. [less ▲]

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See detailContinuous odour measurement from fattening pig units
Romain, Anne-Claude ULg; Nicolas, Jacques ULg; Cobut, Pierre et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2013), 77

A study in experimental slatted-system fattening pig units was conducted with the aim of estimating the odour emission factor (in ou/s.pig), which can subsequently be used in dispersion models to assess ... [more ▼]

A study in experimental slatted-system fattening pig units was conducted with the aim of estimating the odour emission factor (in ou/s.pig), which can subsequently be used in dispersion models to assess the odour annoyance zone. Dynamic olfactometry measurements carried out at different development stages of pigs showed a logical trend of the mean predicted odour emission factor with the pig weight. However, the variation within the same weight class was much larger than variation between classes. Possible causes of such variation were identified as the evolution of ventilation rate during the day and the circadian rhythm of pig. To be able to monitor continuously the daily variation of the odour, an electronic nose was used with suitable regression model calibrated against olfactometric measurements. After appropriate validation check, the electronic nose proved to be convenient, as a complementary tool to dynamic olfactometry, to record the daily variation of the odour emission factor in the pig barn. It was demonstrated that, in the controlled conditions of the experimental pens, the daily variation of the odour emission rate could be mainly attributed to the sole influence of the circadian rhythm of pig. As a consequence, determining a representative odour emission factor in a real case cannot be based on a snapshot odour sampling. [less ▲]

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See detailClear link between drought stress, photosynthesis and biogenic volatile organic compounds in Fagus sylvatica L.
Šimpraga, M.; Verbeeck, H.; Demarcke, M. et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2011), 45(30), 5254-5259

Direct plant stress sensing is the key for a quantitative understanding of drought stress effects on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions. A given level of drought stress might have a ... [more ▼]

Direct plant stress sensing is the key for a quantitative understanding of drought stress effects on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions. A given level of drought stress might have a fundamentally different effect on the BVOC emissions of different plants. For the first time, we continuously quantified the level of drought stress in a young potted beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) with a linear variable displacement transducer (LVDT) installed at stem level in combination with simultaneous measurements of BVOC emissions and photosynthesis rates at leaf level. This continuous set of measurements allowed us to examine how beech alters its pattern of photosynthesis and carbon allocation to BVOC emissions (mainly monoterpenes, MTs) and radial stem growth during the development of drought stress. We observed an increasing-decreasing trend in the MT emissions as well as in the fraction of assimilated carbon re-emitted back into the atmosphere (ranging between 0.14 and 0.01%). We were able to link these dynamics to pronounced changes in radial stem growth, which served as a direct plant stress indicator. Interestingly, we detected a sudden burst in emission of a non-identified, non-MT BVOC species when drought stress was acute (i.e. pronounced negative stem growth). This burst might have been caused by a certain stress-related green leaf volatile, which disappeared immediately upon re-watering and thus the alleviation of drought stress. These results highlight that direct plant stress sensing creates opportunities to understand the overall complexity of stress-related BVOC emissions. [less ▲]

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See detailConstitutive versus heat and biotic stress induced BVOC emissions in Pseudotsuga menziesii
Joó, É.; Dewulf, J.; Amelynck, C. et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2011), 45(22), 3655-3662

Induced volatiles have been a focus of recent research, as not much is known of their emission behavior or atmospheric contribution. BVOC emissions were measured from Pseudotsuga menziesii saplings under ... [more ▼]

Induced volatiles have been a focus of recent research, as not much is known of their emission behavior or atmospheric contribution. BVOC emissions were measured from Pseudotsuga menziesii saplings under natural environmental conditions, using a dynamic branch enclosure system and GC-MS for their analysis. We determined temperature and light dependency of the individual compounds, studied seasonality of the emissions and discuss the effect of heat stress in comparison with two specific biotic stresses that occurred naturally on the trees. A standardized emission rate of 6.8 μg g (dw) -1 h -1 for monoterpenes under stressed conditions was almost a magnitude higher than that obtained for healthy trees (0.8 ± 0.2 μg g (dw) -1 h -1), with higher beta factors characterizing the stressed trees. The response of the emissions to light intensity was different for the individual compounds, suggesting a distinct minimum light intensity to reach saturation. Heat stress changed the relative contribution of specific volatiles, with larger extent of increase of sesquiterpenes, methyl salicylate and linalool emissions compared to monoterpenes. Biotic stress kept low the emissions of sesquiterpenes, (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene and methylbutenol isomers, and increased the level of methyl salicylate and monoterpenes. The ratio of β-pinene/α-pinene was also found to be significantly enhanced from 1.3 to 2.4 and 3.2 for non-stressed, heat stressed and combined biotic and heat stressed, respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailComparing monoterpenoid emissions and net photosynthesis of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in controlled and natural conditions
Šimpraga; Verbeeck, H.; Demarcke, M. et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2011), 45(17), 2922-2928

Although biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) only represent a very limited fraction of the plant's carbon (C) budget, they play an important role in atmospheric chemistry for example as a ... [more ▼]

Although biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) only represent a very limited fraction of the plant's carbon (C) budget, they play an important role in atmospheric chemistry for example as a precursor of tropospheric ozone. We performed a study comparing BVOC emissions of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in controlled and natural environmental conditions. A young and adult beech tree was exposed to short-term temperature variations in growth room conditions and in an experimental forest, respectively. This study attempts to clarify how short-term temperature variations between days influenced the ratio between monoterpenoid (MT) emissions and net photosynthesis (Pn). Within a temperature range of 17-27 °C and 13-23 °C, the MT/Pn carbon ratio increased 10-30 fold for the growth room and forest, respectively. An exponential increasing trend between MT/Pn C ratio and air temperature was observed in both conditions. Beech trees re-emitted a low fraction of the assimilated C back into the atmosphere as MT: 0.01-0.12% and 0.01-0.30% with a temperature rise from 17 to 27 °C and 13-23 °C in growth room and forest conditions, respectively. However, the data showed that the MT/Pn C ratio of young and adult beech trees responded significantly to changes in temperature. [less ▲]

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See detailIsoprene and monoterpene emissions from a mixed temperate forest
Laffineur, Quentin ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Schoon, N. et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2011), 45

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See detailHistory effect of light and temperature on monoterpenoid emissions from Fagus sylvatica L.
Demarcke, M.; Schoon, N.; Van Langenhove, H. et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2010), 44(27), 3261-3268

Monoterpenoid emissions from Fagus sylvatica L trees have been measured at light- and temperature-controlled conditions in a growth chamber, using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and ... [more ▼]

Monoterpenoid emissions from Fagus sylvatica L trees have been measured at light- and temperature-controlled conditions in a growth chamber, using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and the dynamic branch enclosure technique. De novo synthesized monoterpenoid Standard Emission Factors, obtained by applying the G97 algorithm (Guenther, 1997), varied between 2 and 32 mu g g(-1)DW h(-1) and showed a strong decline in late August and September, probably due to senescence. The response of monoterpenoid emissions to temperature variations at a constant daily light pattern could be well reproduced with a modified version of the MEGAN algorithm (Guenther et al., 2006), with a typical dependence on the average temperature over the past five days. The diurnal emissions at constant temperature showed a typical hysteretic behaviour, which could also be adequately described with the modified MEGAN algorithm by taking into account a dependence on the average light levels experienced by the trees during the past 10-13 h. The impact of the past light and temperature conditions on the monoterpenoid emissions from E sylvatica L was found to be much stronger than assumed in previous algorithms. Since our experiments were conducted under low light intensity, future studies should aim at confirming and completing the proposed algorithm updates in sunny conditions and natural environments. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of odour sources in an industrial park from resident diaries statistics
Nicolas, Jacques ULg; Cors, M.; Romain, Anne-Claude ULg et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2010), 44

A methodology based on social participation through the use of resident diaries was applied to evaluate the odour annoyance in the surroundings of an industrial park in Belgium during one year. The ... [more ▼]

A methodology based on social participation through the use of resident diaries was applied to evaluate the odour annoyance in the surroundings of an industrial park in Belgium during one year. The studied area covers about 8 km2 and includes13 potential odour emitting facilities. The network involved 44 residents in the survey, among whom 19 were particularly considered for a detailed analysis. The questionnaire aimed at providing an odour rating twice-daily on a 6-level scale together with an odour type. The fact that the response rate corresponding to “no-odour” was high (79%) is particularly discussed. Some tests are proposed to check the plausibility of the answers, the coherence within clusters of residents and the individual performance of respondents to discriminate among odour ratings. The odour rose is presented as an attractive and visual tool, particularly suited in the case of multi-source areas, to map the different odour emissions, to point out the most worrying ones, to identify others creating less annoyance and possibly new unpredicted ones. The resident diary method has proven to be particularly useful, conjointly to other ones, to the case of multi-sources facilities in large areas, when the purpose is the assessment of the long-term evolution of odour annoyance. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment and validating procedure of a formula to calculate a minimum separation distance from piggeries and poultry facilities to sensitive receptors
Nicolas, Jacques ULg; Delva, Julien ULg; Cobut, Pierre et al

in Atmospheric Environment (2008), 42(30), 7087-7095

A specific formula to calculate separation distance from piggeries and poultry facilities to sensitive receptor is developed for Walloon Region, in Belgium. The paper briefly presents the main principles ... [more ▼]

A specific formula to calculate separation distance from piggeries and poultry facilities to sensitive receptor is developed for Walloon Region, in Belgium. The paper briefly presents the main principles of the formula and discusses more deeply the compatibility of the distance approach with odour units, odour rate and percentiles usually applied to assess the odour annoyance zones. A method of validation is presented and tested to adjust the different parameters of the formula to Belgian field reality. A total of 43 farms of which 21 piggeries and 22 poultry facilities are visited and, for each case, the distance calculated by the formula is compared to the one deduced from odour annoyance criterion (10 ou m-3 at 98th percentile). Validation work results in discussing the sensibility of different factors of the formula and especially in adjusting a fitting factor to match the absolute distances to real field annoyance impression. Conclusions show that both approaches - separation distance formula and percentile evaluation - are coherent. The validation method allows parameter adjustment but should need further refinements to examine separately piggeries and poultry facilities. [less ▲]

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