References of "Advances in Animal Biosciences"
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See detailImplementation in breeding programmes
Coffey, M.P.; McParland, S.; Bastin, Catherine ULg et al

in Advances in Animal Biosciences (2013), 4(3), 626-630

Genetic improvement is easy when selecting for one heritable and well-recorded trait at a time. Many industrialised national dairy herds have overall breeding indices that incorporate a range of traits ... [more ▼]

Genetic improvement is easy when selecting for one heritable and well-recorded trait at a time. Many industrialised national dairy herds have overall breeding indices that incorporate a range of traits balanced by their known or estimated economic value. Future breeding goals will contain more non-production traits and, in the context of this paper, traits associated with human health and cow robustness. The definition of Robustness and the traits used to predict it are currently fluid; however, the use of mid-infrared reflectance spectroscopic analysis of milk will help to create new phenotypes on a large scale that can be used to improve the human health characteristics of milk and the robustness of cows producing it. This paper describes the state-of-the-art in breeding strategies that include animal robustness (mainly energy status) and milk quality (as described by milk fatty acid profile), with particular emphasis on the research results generated by the FP7-funded RobustMilk project [less ▲]

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See detailPhenotyping of robustness and milk quality
Berry, D.P.; McParland, S.; Bastin, Catherine ULg et al

in Advances in Animal Biosciences (2013), 4(3), 600-605

A phenotype describes the outcome of the interacting development between the genotype of an individual and its specific environment throughout life. Animal breeding currently exploits large data sets of ... [more ▼]

A phenotype describes the outcome of the interacting development between the genotype of an individual and its specific environment throughout life. Animal breeding currently exploits large data sets of phenotypic and pedigree information to estimate the genetic merit of animals. Here we describe rapid, low-cost phenomic tools for dairy cattle. We give particular emphasis to infrared spectroscopy of milk because the necessary spectral data are already routinely available on milk samples from individual cows and herds, and therefore the operational cost of implementing such a phenotyping strategy is minimal. The accuracy of predicting milk quality traits from mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIR) analysis of milk, although dependent on the trait under investigation, is particularly promising for differentiating between good and poor-quality dairy products. Many fatty acid concentrations in milk, and in particular saturated fatty acid content, can be very accurately predicted from milk MIR. These results have been confirmed in many international populations. Albeit from only two studied populations investigated in the RobustMilk project, milk MIR analysis also appears to be a reasonable predictor of cow energy balance, a measure of animal robustness; high accuracy of prediction was not expected as the gold standard method of measuring energy balance in those populations was likely to contain error. Because phenotypes predicted from milk MIR are available routinely from milk testing, longitudinal data analyses could be useful to identify animals of superior genetic merit for milk quality and robustness, as well as for monitoring changes in milk quality and robustness because of management, while simultaneously accounting for the genetic merit of the animals. These sources of information can be very valuable input parameters in decision-support tools for both milk producers and processors. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic parameters for methane emission predicted from milk mid-infrared spectra in dairy cows
Kandel, Purna Bhadra ULg; Vanrobays, Marie-Laure ULg; Vanlierde, Amélie et al

in Advances in Animal Biosciences (2013), 4(2),

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See detailPotential mineral deficiencies for Ndama cattle grazing Urochloa sp. based tropical pastures in the Bas-Congo province of the Democratic Republic of Congo
Picron, Pascale ULg; Goubau, Amaury ULg; Lecomte, Thomas et al

in Advances in Animal Biosciences (2011), 2(2), 388

Artificial pastures are used to increase carrying capacity in the wet tropics by supplying higher quality forage (energy and protein) to the animals all year long. Sowing pastures is labour-intensive so ... [more ▼]

Artificial pastures are used to increase carrying capacity in the wet tropics by supplying higher quality forage (energy and protein) to the animals all year long. Sowing pastures is labour-intensive so to be profitable all other possible growth limiting factors, especially minerals, should be alleviated. We studied nutrients intake (energy, protein and minerals) in cattle grazing Urochloa sp. pastures in Western DRC. Three Urochloa ruziziensis and 3 U. decumbens pastures in Kolo-Fuma (Bas-Congo, DRC) were studied. Three Ndama steers and 3 cows grazing each pasture consecutively during the short rainy and dry seasons were followed by handplucking and samples were analysed for energy, crude protein and ash to calculate energy value (fodder units, FU) and digestible crude protein content (DCP) of the diets. NIRS was used on faeces to determine dry matter (DM) intake and ICP-AES to determine mineral content of the diets. Intake levels reached 66 ± 4.3 g kg-1LW0.75, nutritive value of forage was 0.701 ± 0.036 FU and 4.78 ± 1.04 % DCP, allowing daily weight gains > 550 g for steers and > 350 g for cows. P, Ca, Mg, K, Mn & Fe were provided above requirements by the pasture. Na, Cu and Zn were deficient, especially during the short dry season for Cu and Zn. U. ruziziensis pastures tended to provide more minerals, especially during the rainy season. A mineral supplement providing Na, Cu and Zn is required to reach the daily weight gains allowed by energy and protein supplies. The supplement could reasonably be similar for U. decumbens and U. ruziziensis pastures, but the dry season formula should provide more Cu and Zn than the rainy season formula [less ▲]

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See detailNutritive value of fibrous ingredients fed to pigs in the Democratic Republic of Congo measured using an in vitro technique
Kambashi Mutiaka, Bienvenu ULg; Boudry, Christelle ULg; Picron, Pascale ULg et al

in Advances in Animal Biosciences (2010, November), 1(2), 423-424

Incorporation of forages in the diets can improve the economics of smallholder pig production in tropical countries. However, the information on the nutritive value of fibrous crop by-products and forages ... [more ▼]

Incorporation of forages in the diets can improve the economics of smallholder pig production in tropical countries. However, the information on the nutritive value of fibrous crop by-products and forages species used as ingredients in pig diets is scarce. The present work aimed at measuring the chemical composition and the nutritive value using an in vitro model of the pig gastro-intestinal tract of 21 ingredients used by farmers in the province of Bas-Congo (D.R. Congo). [less ▲]

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See detailThe effect of pasture utilization on the defoliation of grass species by steers grazing a tropical savanna woodland during the dry season
Benvenutti, Marcelo; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; O'Reagain, Peter et al

in Advances in Animal Biosciences (2010), 1

The relationship between grazing pressure and differences in the defoliation rate of grass species is not well understood for tropical savannas even though it is likely to have a substantial influence on ... [more ▼]

The relationship between grazing pressure and differences in the defoliation rate of grass species is not well understood for tropical savannas even though it is likely to have a substantial influence on the persistence of preferred species, pasture condition and sustainability of the grazing system. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between grass species characteristics and their defoliation rate in a paddock under increasing levels of utilization. Nine steers grazed a Eucalyptus savanna woodland for 14 days. Total pasture utilization reached 70% on day 13. The results confirm that with increasing pasture utilization, the defoliation rate of grasses varied among species. Bothriochloa pertusa (Bp) was the preferred species, with the highest levels of utilization after 5, 7 and 13 days. This species had the highest leaf/stem ratio and basal area (P<0.05), and intermediate stem tensile resistance, stem density, bulk density and plant height. These characteristics probably allowed the steers to achieve high nutrient intake rates. The steers avoided B. ewartiana possibly due to its tough stems and low leaf/stem ratio. In this tropical pasture the steers heavily grazed the preferred species at low to intermediate levels of overall pasture utilization (10 to 38%). In order to increase the utilization of less preferred species it was necessary to achieve high levels of pasture utilization (60 to 70%). [less ▲]

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