References of "Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica"
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See detailCatastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome : case reports and review of the literature
GUNTZ, Julien; LAYIOS, Nathalie ULg; DAMAS, Pierre ULg

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2014), 65

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See detailPreeclampsia: an update.
LAMBERT, Géraldine ULg; BRICHANT, Jean-François ULg; Hartstein, Gary ULg et al

in Acta anaesthesiologica Belgica (2014), 65(4), 137-49

Preeclampsia was formerly defined as a multisystemic disorder characterized by new onset of hypertension (i.e. systolic blood pressure (SBP) >/= 140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) >/= 90 mmHg ... [more ▼]

Preeclampsia was formerly defined as a multisystemic disorder characterized by new onset of hypertension (i.e. systolic blood pressure (SBP) >/= 140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) >/= 90 mmHg) and proteinuria (> 300 mg/24 h) arising after 20 weeks of gestation in a previously normotensive woman. Recently, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has stated that proteinuria is no longer required for the diagnosis of preeclampsia. This complication of pregnancy remains a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Clinical signs appear in the second half of pregnancy, but initial pathogenic mechanisms arise much earlier. The cytotrophoblast fails to remodel spiral arteries, leading to hypoperfusion and ischemia of the placenta. The fetal consequence is growth restriction. On the maternal side, the ischemic placenta releases factors that provoke a generalized maternal endothelial dysfunction. The endothelial dysfunction is in turn responsible for the symptoms and complications of preeclampsia. These include hypertension, proteinuria, renal impairment, thrombocytopenia, epigastric pain, liver dysfunction, hemolysis-elevated liver enzymes-low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome, visual disturbances, headache, and seizures. Despite a better understanding of preeclampsia pathophysiology and maternal hemodynamic alterations during preeclampsia, the only curative treatment remains placenta and fetus delivery. At the time of diagnosis, the initial objective is the assessment of disease severity. Severe hypertension (SBP >/= 160 mm Hg and/or DBP >/= 110 mmHg), thrombocytopenia < 100.000/muL, liver transaminases above twice the normal values, HELLP syndrome, renal failure, persistent epigastric or right upper quadrant pain, visual or neurologic symptoms, and acute pulmonary edema are all severity criteria. Medical treatment depends on the severity of preeclampsia, and relies on antihypertensive medications and magnesium sulfate. Medical treatment does not alter the course of the disease, but aims at preventing the occurrence of intracranial hemorrhages and seizures. The decision of terminating pregnancy and perform delivery is based on gestational age, maternal and fetal conditions, and severity of preeclampsia. Delivery is proposed for patients with preeclampsia without severe features after 37 weeks of gestation and in case of severe preeclampsia after 34 weeks of gestation. Between 24 and 34 weeks of gestation, conservative management of severe preeclampsia may be considered in selected patients. Antenatal corticosteroids should be administered to less than 34 gestation week preeclamptic women to promote fetal lung maturity. Termination of pregnancy should be discussed if severe preeclampsia occurs before 24 weeks of gestation. Maternal end organ dysfunction and non-reassuring tests of fetal well-being are indications for delivery at any gestational age. Neuraxial analgesia and anesthesia are, in the absence of thrombocytopenia, strongly considered as first line anesthetic techniques in preeclamptic patients. Airway edema and tracheal intubation-induced elevation in blood pressure are important issues of general anesthesia in those patients. The major adverse outcomes associated with preeclampsia are related to maternal central nervous system hemorrhage, hepatic rupture, and renal failure. Preeclampsia is also a risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease later in life, and therefore mandates long-term follow-up. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring end expiratory lung volume after cardiac surgery
MICHIELS, Grégoire ULg; MARCHAL, Vanessa; LEDOUX, Didier ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2012), 63(3), 115-120

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See detailLinking sleep and general anesthesia mechanisms: this is no walkover
BONHOMME, Vincent ULg; BOVEROUX, Pierre ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2011), 62(3), 161-171

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See detailSurgical resection of a sphenoid wing meningioma in a patient with Glanzmann thrombasthenia.
WERTZ, Damien ULg; Boveroux, Pierre ULg; PETERS, Pierre ULg et al

in Acta anaesthesiologica Belgica (2011), 62(2), 83-6

Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a deficiency or functional defect of platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa. Physiologically, this platelet receptor ... [more ▼]

Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a deficiency or functional defect of platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa. Physiologically, this platelet receptor mediates aggregation of activated platelets by binding the adhesive proteins, fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor (VWF) and fibronectin. This facilitates attachment and aggregation of platelets at sites of vascular injury. We reported the management of a pterional meningioma resection in a patient with Glanzmann thrombasthenia, with recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa - NovoSeven) as haemostatic agent. A 48-year-old woman suffering from Glanzmann thrombasthenia was scheduled for spheno-orbital meningioma en plaque surgery. Because of repeated platelet transfusions, this patient developed isoantibodies against missing GPIIbIIIa and alloantibodies against Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) leading to refractoriness to platelet transfusions. We observed that Novoseven offered sufficient haemostasis conditions. Therefore, we noticed a deep vein thrombosis. This imposed us to use low weight molecular heparin despite recent surgery. [less ▲]

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See detailMaintaining the communication and information tool of the Belgian anesthesiology community
BONHOMME, Vincent ULg

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2011), 62(4), 173-174

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See detailLipomatous hypertrophy of the interatrial septum: the typical echographic aspect is worth being known
ROYER, Ludovic ULg; HANS, Grégory ULg; CANIVET, Jean-Luc ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2011), 62(3), 157-159

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See detailUnexpected entropy response to saline spraying at the end of posterior fossa surgery: a few cases report.
Clanet, Matthieu; BONHOMME, Vincent ULg; Lhoest, L. et al

in Acta anaesthesiologica Belgica (2011), 62(2), 87-90

The Spectral Entropy proposed to monitor the depth of anesthesia includes the State Entropy (SE) computed from the EEG (0.8-32 Hz frequency band), and the Response Entropy (RE) computed from EEG and ... [more ▼]

The Spectral Entropy proposed to monitor the depth of anesthesia includes the State Entropy (SE) computed from the EEG (0.8-32 Hz frequency band), and the Response Entropy (RE) computed from EEG and facial muscles activity (0.5-47 Hz frequency band). We report an unexpected Entropy response to saline spraying at the end of posterior fossa surgery. Six patients undergoing scheduled functional surgery of the posterior fossa were included in this report. They were anesthetized with propofol and remifentanil using TCI and received an intubation dose of rocuronium. At the end of surgery, saline spraying, performed for hemostatic purpose and wreckage elimination, resulted in a sustained increase in RE and SE without hemodynamic modification in four patients, while no change was observed in the two other ones. In one of the responding patients, 0.1 mg kg(-1) rocuronium attenuated the Entropy response. In the two non responders, repetition of spraying or rocuronium administration did not change Entropy value. Recovery from anesthesia was comparable in all patients and none of them complained from awareness. We conclude that Entropy can increase during posterior fossa surgery in non-paralyzed patients. This response probably reflects an increase in facial muscle activity rather than a change in depth of anesthesia, as far as it can be attenuated by a small dose of rocuronium. While this hypothesis requires further investigation, these observations suggest that saline spraying may confound interpretation of Entropy during posterior fossa surgery. [less ▲]

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See detailAntiplatelet therapy in the perioperative period.
Engelen, S.; Sinaeve, P.; Van Damme, Hendrik ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2010), 61

antiplatelet drugs are the cornerstone treatment in the secondary prevention of arterial thrombosis. Until recently, their intake was interrupted in the perioperative period because of fear for bleeding ... [more ▼]

antiplatelet drugs are the cornerstone treatment in the secondary prevention of arterial thrombosis. Until recently, their intake was interrupted in the perioperative period because of fear for bleeding, but new insights have challenged this old habit. in patients at high risk for atherothrombotic events who need to undergo surgery or an invasive procedure, the risk for bleeding complications because of a treatment with low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (lD aSa) needs to be balanced against the risk of atherothrombotic events after treatment discontinuation. for patients at high risk of atherothrombotic complications recent guidelines do no longer advocate to interrupt lD aSa routinely. However, the likelihood of bleeding versus atherothrombotic complications should be considered on a case-by-case basis. when continued perioperatively, the bleeding risk associated with thienopyridines (ticlopidine, clopidogrel and prasugrel) is higher than that of lD aSa. it is recommended to stop their intake 1 week before the surgical intervention, except in patients with (recent) coronary stenting [less ▲]

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See detailIntracranial subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia: case report and review of the literature
Machurot, P. Y.; Vergnion, M.; Fraipont, V. et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2010), 61(2), 63-66

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See detailEffect of the transversus abdominis plane block on pain after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair
Adedjoumo, Moibi; Amabili, P.; Detry, Olivier ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2009, September 19), 60(3), 205

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See detailEffects of oral preoperative carbohydrate on early postoperative outcome after thyroidectomy
Lauwick, Séverine ULg; Kaba, Abdourahmane ULg; Maweja, Sylvie ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2009), 60(2), 67-73

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See detailPostoperative respiratory problems in morbidly obese patients.
Hans, Grégory ULg; Lauwick, Séverine ULg; Kaba, Abdourahmane ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2009), 60(3), 169-75

Morbid obesity results in a restrictive pulmonary syndrome including decreased functional residual capacity. General anaesthesia further decreases functional residual capacity, and consequently alters gas ... [more ▼]

Morbid obesity results in a restrictive pulmonary syndrome including decreased functional residual capacity. General anaesthesia further decreases functional residual capacity, and consequently alters gas exchanges more profoundly in morbidly obese patients than in nonobese patients. Moreover, these changes persist longer during the postoperative period, rendering obese subjects vulnerable to postoperative respiratory complications. In this review, we present postoperative measures improving respiratory function of these patients. Whether these measures affect outcome remains however unknown. Patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome deserve special considerations that are briefly described. Finally, the algorithm of the postoperative respiratory management of morbid obese patients used in our institution is provided. [less ▲]

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See detailPulmonary embolism in a trauma patient with liver and orthopedic injuries
Legrain, Caroline ULg; Hans, Grégory ULg; Defresne, Aline ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2009), 60(4), 259-262

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See detailEffect of Clonidine on Propofol and Remifentanil requirements using BIS score and the A-line ARX (AAI) index during laparoscopic gastric bypass in obese patients
Rosant, Séverine; Nkiko, Gédéon; Lauwick, Séverine ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2008, June 14), 59(3), 228

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