References of "2012"
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See detailEarly Jezirah 3b Pottery from Tell Beydar. Selected Inventories from latest excavation campaigns
Mas, Juliette ULg; Gavagnin, Katia

Conference (2012, April)

Since 1992, excavations at Tell Beydar have offered the opportunity to explore an urban centre of the Upper Khabur region. The extensive exploration of the EJZ 3b levels gave us access to the urbanism and ... [more ▼]

Since 1992, excavations at Tell Beydar have offered the opportunity to explore an urban centre of the Upper Khabur region. The extensive exploration of the EJZ 3b levels gave us access to the urbanism and the architecture of the city as well as its material culture, especially the pottery. The assemblages presented in this paper were exclusively found directly on the floors of various buildings (of a public, domestic, religious, offi- cial nature) and inside a grave. Most of these inventories consist of complete vessels discovered either intact or smashed but restorable. The aim of this paper is to investigate if, or to what extent, the intra-site distribution of the morphological repertoire of Beydar IIIb ceramic is related to its context of use. [less ▲]

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See detailPosture polémique ou polémisation de la posture ?
Moor, Louise ULg

in COnTEXTES : Revue de Sociologie de la Littérature (2012), 10

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See detailTwo distinct origins of long-term learning effects in verbal short-term memory?
Majerus, Steve ULg; Oberauer, K.

Conference (2012, April)

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See detailImaginaires de la vie littéraire. Fiction, figuration, configuration
Dozo, Björn-Olav ULg; Glinoer, Anthony; Lacroix, Michel

Book published by Presses universitaires de Rennes (2012)

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See detailExpression of specific pathways in the inflamed synovial membrane of osteoarthritis patient: Identification of new potential key intermediates
Lambert, Cécile ULg; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Hennuy, Benoît ULg et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2012, April), 20(Supplement 1), 56

Purpose: Synovitis is a key factor in osteoarthritis (OA) pathophysiology, contributing to both patient symptoms and disease progression. In this study, using an original methodology comparing normal ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Synovitis is a key factor in osteoarthritis (OA) pathophysiology, contributing to both patient symptoms and disease progression. In this study, using an original methodology comparing normal/reactive (N/R) and inflammatory (I) synovial membranes zones, we investigated the gene expression profiles of synovial cells from these areas and identified differentially regulated pathways. <br />Methods: Synovial cells (SC) were isolated from OA synovial specimens obtained from 12 patients undergoing knee replacement. The inflammatory status of the synovial membrane was characterized by the surgeon according to macroscopic criteria including the synovial vascularization, the villi formation and the hypertrophic aspect of the tissue. At the surgery time, the synovial membrane was dissected and biopsies from N/R and I areas cultured separately for a period of 7 days. Total RNA was extracted using the RNeasy Mini Kit. RNA purity and quality were evaluated using the Experion RNA StdSens Analysis kit (Bio-rad Laboratories). Gene expression profiling between N/R and I areas was performed using Illumina’s multi-sample format Human HT-12 BeadChip (Illumina Inc.). Differential analysis was performed with the BRB array tools software. Class Comparison test between N/R and I areas was based on paired t-test where N/R and I were paired for each patient. The biological relevance of up- and down-regulated genes was analyses with Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (Ingenuity® Systems). Western blot was performed to confirm certain intermediate expression. <br />Results: From among 47000 probes, 17500 were filtered out. Probes with a p-value below than 0.005 were chosen and classified as up- or down-regulated ones. By this way, 896 differentially expressed genes between N/R and I zones were identified. Among these, 576 genes were upregulated (I/NR > 1.5) and 320 downregulated (I/NR < 0.75). With Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, a significant number of the top ranking differentially expressed genes were identified as inflammatory, Wnt and angiogenic pathways. Interleukin (IL)-6 and -8, chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL5, CXCL6, CXCL16) and arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) were identified as the most upregulated in I zones in the inflammatory pathway. Interestingly, the alarmin S100A9 was found strongly upregulated in this pathway. Wnt5A and LRP (Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein) 5 were upregulated whereas FZD (Frizzled homolog) 2 and DKK (dickkopf homolog) 3 were downregulated in the Wnt signaling pathway. Finally, stanniocalcin (STC)-1, an intermediate in angiogenesis was identified as the most upregulated gene in I zones compared to N/R zones. This difference of expression was confirmed at the protein level. <br />Conclusions: Using a unique culture system, this study is the first to identify different expression pattern between two areas of synovial membrane from the same OA patient. These differences concern several key pathways involved in OA pathogenesis, i.e. inflammation, Wnt and angiogenesis. This analysis also provided interesting information regarding new potent intermediates as S100A9 and STC-1. They could be potential targets for chondroitin sulfate, one of the most used molecules in the management of OA. New experiments are being perfomed at the moment to elucidate the potential effect of this molecule on these specific differentially expressed genes in the same culture system. [less ▲]

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See detailTHE RESPONSE OF ACETOBACTER SENEGALENSIS TO STRESSORS: A STUDY TOWARDS IMPROVEMENT OF VINEGAR STARTER PRODUCTION
Shafiei, Rasoul ULg; Thonart, Philippe ULg

in Acetic Acid Bacteria (2012, April)

Acetic acid bacteria encounter various harsh conditions during acetic acid fermentation. Ethanol as the main substrate and acetic acid as the major product at low pH can influence deeply on the cellular ... [more ▼]

Acetic acid bacteria encounter various harsh conditions during acetic acid fermentation. Ethanol as the main substrate and acetic acid as the major product at low pH can influence deeply on the cellular functions of acetic acid bacteria. In previous studies in CWBI, Acetobacter senegalensis was used for production of dried vinegar starters; however the impact of stressors (ethanol and acetic acid) on A. senegalensis remained unclear. In this study, different techniques such as flow cytometry, culturability on solid medium and 2-DiGE were used comparatively to investigate the effect of carbon sources of inoculum media on the tolerance of A. senegalensis to stressors. Analysis of respiration system by flow cytometric methods showed that the presence of 2% (v/v) acetic acid in inoculum medium, in one hand, causes 80% of cells to continue to do respiration after a sudden exposure to 1- 3% (v/v) acetic acid in stress media while 89.7% of cells grown in glucose appeared as dead cells after an abrupt exposure to 3%(v/v) of acetic acid. On the other hand, 59.2% and 49.33% of cells grown in the presence of 2% (v/v) of acetic acid could maintain their entire membrane integrity after exposure to 1% and 3% (v/v) of acetic acid, respectively. Inoculum medium contained 5% (v/v) of ethanol as a carbon source enabled about 90% of cells to keep their growing capacities after a sudden exposure to 3% acetic acid. In contrast, just 40% of cells grown in glucose as a carbon source maintained their culturability on solid medium after exposure to 1% acetic acid. A similar profile of culturability was observed for the cells grown in 5% (v/v) ethanol or 2% (v/v) of acetic acid. A proteomic approach (2-DiGE) was used to analyze proteins expressed in the presence of different carbon sources. Differentially expressed proteins were mainly associated with energy metabolism, carbohydrate metabolisms, folding, sorting and degradation processes. The relative abundance of proteins was extensively different for cell grown in glucose compared with protein contents of cells grown in ethanol or acetic acid. In conclusion, production of a cost effective vinegar starter needs a qualified biomass which tolerates ethanol and acetic acid. Tolerance of A. senegalensis to acetic acid depends to a great extent on the composition of the medium which cells grow in. In spite of low adaption to acetic acid for cell grown in glucose, using ethanol or acetic acid in inoculum media renders a physiological state in A. senegelensis which enables it to cope with higher concentration of acetic acid readily, this biomass has a potential to be used as a starter [less ▲]

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See detailExperimental Results of Flat Fresnel Doublets made of PMMA and PC
Languy, Fabian ULg; Fleury-Frenette, Karl ULg; Lenaerts, Cedric ULg et al

Conference (2012, April)

To reduce the chromatic aberration lots of imaging systems like cameras and telescopes turn to achromatic doublets. On the other hand, to be cheaper, lighter and thinner, more and more systems like ... [more ▼]

To reduce the chromatic aberration lots of imaging systems like cameras and telescopes turn to achromatic doublets. On the other hand, to be cheaper, lighter and thinner, more and more systems like projectors and headlights use Fresnel lenses. To combine high performances and low cost, the use achromatic Fresnel doublets has been investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailI create smile
LAMBERT, France ULg

Conference (2012, April)

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See detailEthique et renseignement
Cools, marc; Debruyne, Emmanuel; Franceus, Frank et al

in Cahiers d'études du Renseignement (2012), 1

Périodique réalisé par le Belgian Intelligence studies center sur base du colloque intitulé: Ethique et renseignement

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See detailLes querelles littéraires : esquisse méthodologique
Stienon, Valérie ULg; Saint-Amand, Denis ULg; Bertrand, Jean-Pierre ULg

in COnTEXTES : Revue de Sociologie de la Littérature (2012), 10

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See detailObserved and simulated time evolution of HCl, ClONO2, and HF total column abundances
Kohlhepp, R; Ruhnke, R; Chipperfield, M P et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2012), 12(7), 3527--3556

Time series of total column abundances of hydrogen chloride (HCl), chlorine nitrate (ClONO2), and hydrogen fluoride (HF) were determined from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra ... [more ▼]

Time series of total column abundances of hydrogen chloride (HCl), chlorine nitrate (ClONO2), and hydrogen fluoride (HF) were determined from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra recorded at 17 sites belonging to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) and located between 80.05°N and 77.82°S. By providing such a near-global overview on ground-based measurements of the two major stratospheric chlorine reservoir species, HCl and ClONO2, the present study is able to confirm the decrease of the atmospheric inorganic chlorine abundance during the last few years. This decrease is expected following the 1987 Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments, where restrictions and a subsequent phase-out of the prominent anthropogenic chlorine source gases (solvents, chlorofluorocarbons) were agreed upon to enable a stabilisation and recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer. The atmospheric fluorine content is expected to be influenced by the Montreal Protocol, too, because most of the banned anthropogenic gases also represent important fluorine sources. But many of the substitutes to the banned gases also contain fluorine so that the HF total column abundance is expected to have continued to increase during the last few years. The measurements are compared with calculations from five different models: the two-dimensional Bremen model, the two chemistry-transport models KASIMA and SLIMCAT, and the two chemistry-climate models EMAC and SOCOL. Thereby, the ability of the models to reproduce the absolute total column amounts, the seasonal cycles, and the temporal evolution found in the FTIR measurements is investigated and inter-compared. This is especially interesting because the models have different architectures. The overall agreement between the measurements and models for the total column abundances and the seasonal cycles is good. Linear trends of HCl, ClONO2, and HF are calculated from both measurement and model time series data, with a focus on the time range 2000–2009. This period is chosen because from most of the measurement sites taking part in this study, data are available during these years. The precision of the trends is estimated with the bootstrap resampling method. The sensitivity of the trend results with respect to the fitting function, the time of year chosen and time series length is investigated, as well as a bias due to the irregular sampling of the measurements. The measurements and model results investigated here agree qualitatively on a decrease of the chlorine species by around 1%yr-1. The models simulate an increase of HF of around 1%yr-1. This also agrees well with most of the measurements, but some of the FTIR series in the Northern Hemisphere show a stabilisation or even a decrease in the last few years. In general, for all three gases, the measured trends vary more strongly with latitude and hemisphere than the modelled trends. Relative to the FTIR measurements, the models tend to underestimate the decreasing chlorine trends and to overestimate the fluorine increase in the Northern Hemisphere. At most sites, the models simulate a stronger decrease of ClONO2 than of HCl. In the FTIR measurements, this difference between the trends of HCl and ClONO2 depends strongly on latitude, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. [less ▲]

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See detailUm conjunto apenas aparentemente heterogêneo de contribuições
Cupani, Alberto; Guivant, Julia; Delvenne, Pierre ULg

in Política & Sociedade (2012), 11(20), 11-21

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See detailEvaluating COSMO’s lake module (FLake) for an East-African lake using a comprehensive set of lake temperature profiles
Thiery, Wim; Martynov, Andrey; Darchambeau, François ULg et al

Conference (2012, April)

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See detailDevelopment of a biomechanical model of deer antler cancellous bone based on X-ray microtomographic images
de Bien, Charlotte ULg; Mengoni, Marlène ULg; D'Otreppe, Vinciane ULg et al

in Micro-CT User Meeting 2012 - Abstract Book (2012, April)

Finite element models accurately compute the mechanical response of bone and bone-like materials when the models include their detailed microstructure. The aim of this paper is to develop and validate a ... [more ▼]

Finite element models accurately compute the mechanical response of bone and bone-like materials when the models include their detailed microstructure. The aim of this paper is to develop and validate a biomechanical model for deer antler cancellous bone tissue based on X-ray microtomographic images. In order to simulate the mechanical behavior under compressive load using a finite element model, images obtained by X-ray microtomography were exported into Metafor, which is an non-linear finite element software initially developed at University of Liège for metal forming processes. This software has recently found biomedical applications. The ultimate goal is to compare model predictions with the mechanical behavior observed experimentally using the Skyscan material testing stage under compression mode. The creation of the biomechanical model mesh from segmented μCT images, its integration into the software Metafor and the simulation of a compression test are described in this paper. [less ▲]

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See detailExpansion of the main auroral oval at Jupiter : evidence for Io’s control over the Jovian magnetosphere
Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

Poster (2012, April)

In spring 2007, New Horizons' Jupiter fly-by provided a unique opportunity for the largest observation campaign dedicated to the Jovian aurora ever carried out by the Hubble Space Telescope. UV images of ... [more ▼]

In spring 2007, New Horizons' Jupiter fly-by provided a unique opportunity for the largest observation campaign dedicated to the Jovian aurora ever carried out by the Hubble Space Telescope. UV images of the aurora have been acquired on a quasi-daily basis from mid-February to mid-June 2007. Polar projection of the auroral emissions clearly show a continuous long-term expansion of main oval additionally to day by day variations. The main oval moved so much that the Ganymede footprint, which is usually located equatorward of the main emissions, has even been observed inside of it. Simultaneously, the occurrence rate of large equatorward isolated auroral features increased over the season. These emission patches are generally attributed to injections of depleted flux tubes. On 6th June, one of these features exceptionally moved down to the Io footpath. The Io footprint seemed to disappear while the footprint moved through this patch of emission. This disappearance is a unique case among all the UV images of the aurora acquired during the last 12 years. We suggest that all these changes seen in the Jovian aurora are evidence for a major reconfiguration of the magnetosphere induced by increased volcanic activity on Io. Indeed, New Horizons observed particularly intense activity from the Tvashtar volcano in late February 2007. Moreover, sodium cloud brightening caused by volcanic outbursts have also been seen in late May 2007. According to our interpretation, repeated volcanic outbursts beefed up the plasma torus density and its mass outflow rate. This caused the corotation breakdown boundary to migrate closer to Jupiter. Consequently, the main auroral oval moved equatorward. As heavy flux tubes move outward, sparsely filled ones should be injected into the inner magnetosphere in order to conserve the magnetic flux in this region. This phenomenon could explain the large number of injection signatures observed in May-June 2007. Such a cloud of depleted flux tubes probably disrupted the Io-magnetosphere interaction, leading to an abnormally faint Io footprint. [less ▲]

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