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See detailDe l'utilité d'une consultation conjointe de gynécologie- endocrinologie pédiatrique : étude rétrospective des motifs de consultation et approche pratique
HARVENGT, Julie ULg; Retz, M.-C.; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(11), 581-8

The gynaecological issues encountered in children and teenagers lay at the intersection of paediatric endocrinology and gynaecology. More than ten years ago, an outpatient clinic in paediatric ... [more ▼]

The gynaecological issues encountered in children and teenagers lay at the intersection of paediatric endocrinology and gynaecology. More than ten years ago, an outpatient clinic in paediatric endocrinology and gynaecology has been created. Here, we review the last 6 years. 214 girls were included, considering only the first visit for each patient. Collected data are initial concern for this consultation, age at first consultation and confirmed or suspected diagnosis. A classification is done according to the initial concern of patients in six categories. Principal queries concern pubertal development, precocious pilosity or abnormalities in menstrual cycles. Vulvovaginitis and morphologic abnormalities are also frequently encountered. This consultation suggests a paediatric approach with a child feeling confident and a gynaecological examination with a specialist knowing the anatomy particularities and the development of the children. This article focuses on the importance of specific gynaecological examination in children and reviews the main diseases encountered. [less ▲]

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See detailTechniques de séchage des starters lactiques et mécanismes affectant la viabilité cellulaire suite à la lyophilisation
Coulibaly, Ibourahema ULg; Dubois Dauphin, Robin ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2011), 15(2), 287-299

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See detailMechanobiology and cell tensegrity: the root of ethnic hair curling?
Pierard-Franchimont, Claudine; PAQUET, Philippe ULg; QUATRESOOZ, Pascale ULg et al

in Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology (2011), 10(2), 163-7

BACKGROUND: The hair shape, either straight, crimp, or curly, is basically under genetic influence. It is possibly altered by some drugs such as cytostatic agents. In addition, specific innate molecular ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The hair shape, either straight, crimp, or curly, is basically under genetic influence. It is possibly altered by some drugs such as cytostatic agents. In addition, specific innate molecular characteristics are modulated by some cosmetic procedures to reshape the hair shafts. AIM: To revisit the possible implication of mechanobiology and cell tensegrity in shaping ethnic hair. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Optical and scanning electron microscopy of hairs. RESULTS: It is generally held that the cross-section shape of hair is related to differences in the global aspect of the hair shaft. A possible biologic link between these features may rely on shaping cell tensegrity at any portion of the hair shaft. Cell tensegrity encompasses all intrinsic and extrinsic forces responsible for the three-dimensional arrangement of intracellular macromolecules. CONCLUSION: We offer as a hypothesis that the hair shape in part depends on the organization of the cell proliferation in the hair matrix. This review gathers observations supporting the involvement of cell tensegrity in shaping the hair shaft. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) as treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) : a survey from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Labopin, Myriam; Niederwieser, Dietger et al

in Blood (2011), 118

The goal of RIC allo-SCT is to harness the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect, while minimizing toxicities and the risk of GVHD. However, prior studies have shown a lower risk of relapse in AML patients ... [more ▼]

The goal of RIC allo-SCT is to harness the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect, while minimizing toxicities and the risk of GVHD. However, prior studies have shown a lower risk of relapse in AML patients (pts) who experienced chronic GVHD after RIC allo-SCT versus in those who did not. Here, we investigated the impact of occurrence of GVHD on transplantation outcomes in a large cohort of AML pts given allogeneic PBSC after RIC conditioning. Data from 1859 AML pts in first (n=1439) or second (n=420) CR transplanted between 2000 and 2009 following a RIC regimen at EBMT affiliated centres were analyzed. Pts were given PBSC from HLA-identical sibling (MRD, n=1208), or from HLA-matched unrelated donors (MUD, n=651). Median pt age at transplantation was 56 y (range, 18–77). 338 male pts were given grafts from female donors. RIC was based on low-dose TBI in 520 (28%) pts, while the remaining pts received chemotherapy-based RIC. ATG was given in 269 (22%) MRD and in 267 (41%) MUD recipients, respectively, while 151 (13%) MRD and 165 (25%) MUD recipients received in-vivo T cell depletion with alemtuzumab. The impact of chronic GVHD on relapse risk, non-relapse mortality (NRM), leukemia-free survival (LFS), and overall survival (OS) was assessed using time-dependent multivariate Cox models and in a landmark analysis at 18 months after transplant. Three-year incidences of relapse, NRM, LFS and OS were 34±1%, 15±1%, 51±2% and 60±2% in MRD recipients, respectively, and 34±2% (p=NS), 24±2% (P<0.001), 42±2% (P=0.001) and 47±2% (P=0.001) in MUD recipients, respectively. Grade II, III and IV acute GVHD were observed in 133 (11%), 61 (5%) and 30 (2%) MRD recipients and in 119 (18%), 41 (6%) and 24 (4%) MUD recipients, respectively. The 3-y cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 47%. Fifty-three percent of patients with chronic GVHD had extensive chronic GVHD, while the remaining 47% had limited chronic GVHD. In multivariate analyses, occurrence of grade II-IV acute GVHD was associated with a lower risk of relapse (HR=0.8; P=0.04), a higher risk of chronic (HR=2.2; P<0.001) and extensive chronic GVHD (HR=2.8; P<0.001), a higher risk of NRM (HR=2.4 P<0.001), a worsened LFS (HR=1.3; P=0.01), and a worsened OS (HR=1.5; P<0.001). In multivariate time-dependent analyses, occurrence of limited chronic GVHD was associated with a lower risk of relapse (HR=0.7; P=0.05), comparable NRM (HR=1.4; P=0.16), comparable LFS (HR=0.9; P=0.29) and better OS (HR=0.5; P<0.001), while occurrence of extensive chronic GVHD was associated with a lower risk of relapse (HR=0.6; P=0.01), higher NRM (HR=3.2; P<0.001), a trend for worsened LFS (HR=1.3; P=0.06) and comparable OS (HR=0.9; P=0.34). The median interval from transplantation to occurrence of chronic GVHD was 163 (range, 100–1545) days. To further assess the graft-versus-leukemia effect of chronic GVHD, we performed a landmark analysis in patients who were leukemia-free at 18 months after transplantation (n=776). Median follow-up from this landmark time-point was 24 (range, 0.1–112) months. Two-year relapse, NRM, LFS and OS were 16±2%, 2.5±1%, 82±2%, and 89±2%, respectively, in patients without chronic GVHD before the landmark time-point, versus 9±1% (P=0.001), 8±1% (P<0.001), 83±2% (P=0.65), and 86±2% (P=0.38), respectively, in patients with chronic GVHD before the landmark time-point.In conclusion, in this cohort of AML patients transplanted in remission, occurrence of chronic GVHD was associated with a lower risk of relapse that translated to better OS in patients with limited chronic GVHD but not in those with extensive chronic GVHD who experienced higher long term NRM, highlighting the need for long term prospective assessment of long term effects and quality of life in patients receiving RIC allo-SCT. [less ▲]

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See detailQuantitative food webs of herbivore and related beneficial community in non–crop and crop habitats
Alhmedi, Ammar; Haubruge, Eric ULg; D’Hoedt, Sandrine et al

in Biological Control (2011), 58

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See detailEtude de l'activité antifongique des bactéries lactiques isolées de produits alimentaires fermentés et caractérisation de leurs métabolites inhibiteurs
Ndagano, Dora ULg

Doctoral thesis (2011)

Summary: The aim of this present research was to study the antifungal properties of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from fermented Mill flour and fermented cassava in order to use them for ... [more ▼]

Summary: The aim of this present research was to study the antifungal properties of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from fermented Mill flour and fermented cassava in order to use them for biopreservation. Antifungal activity of these LAB were assessed in MRS solid medium against food spoilage moulds as Aspergillus niger MUCL 28699, Aspergillus niger CWBIF194, Aspergillus tubingensis MP1 and Penicillium crustosum MY1. Three strains, Lactobacillus plantarum VE56, Weissella cibaria FMF4B16 and Weissella paramesenteroides LC11 were selected among 116 for their strongest inhibitory activity and their broad inhibitory spectrum against food moulds. The 4-fold concentrated supernatant of L. plantarum VE56 and W. paramesenteroides LC11 had the strongest inhibitory activity to compare to W. cibaria FMF4B16. The antifungal activity of the cell-free supernatant was pH dependent and insensitive to proteolytic enzymes action suggesting that the inhibitory activity was due to other compounds than proteins. The identification of antifungal compounds by chromatographic studies highlighted the production of phenyllactic acid by the three strains. In addition, 2-hydroxy-3-methylpentanoic acid and 2-hydroxy-4-methylpentanoic acid were produced by L. plantarum VE56 and W. paramesenteroides LC11. However, the concentration assessed in the supernatant was lower than the minimal inhibitory concentration showing a synergic action of all these produced compounds. The effect of the antifungal supernatant of L. plantarum VE56 and W. paramesenteroides LC11 on Aspergillus flavus NRRL 3357 resulted to an inhibition of conidial development and aflatoxin B1 production which was reflected in decreased gene expression of brlA (conidiophore specific transcription factor) and laeA (global regulator of secondary metabolism). These two bacteria also delayed Penicillium expansum MUCL 14498 conidial development in bread. [less ▲]

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See detailActors' benefit analysis on value chain of fresh dairy milk in Vietnam
Tran Huu; Bui, Thi Nga ULg

in Journal of Economics & Development (2011), (169(II)), 32-38

Vietnam locates in the Asia-the most active region, where gains the highest economic growth rate and highest milk consumption in the world. Vietnam also ranks the second among the highest milk ... [more ▼]

Vietnam locates in the Asia-the most active region, where gains the highest economic growth rate and highest milk consumption in the world. Vietnam also ranks the second among the highest milk productivity in the Asia and milk consumption is increasing rapidly. However, the dairy industry in Vietnam is currently able to meet only 22% of domestic demand; the remaining amount has been imported (VOV/VNA, 2008). In addition, raw milk price is very low while retail price is too high. It leads to low effective in the production of the whole chain. This paper is based on the value chain approach within both quantitative and qualitative methods to evaluate a typical fresh value chain in the North of Vietnam in (Moc Chau platation) in 2008 - 2010. The findings show that the dairy plant is the most powerful actor in the chain and it drives the whole chain while power of dairymen is very weak. The value added of the chain is distributed unequally among its actors in whom more benefitable for non-dairy cow producers. In particular, the value added in dairy cow stage would be much lower. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness and Glasgow Liege Scale/Glasgow Coma Scale in an Intensive Care Unit Population.
Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg et al

in Neurocritical Care (2011), 15(3), 447-53

BACKGROUND: The Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) has been proposed as an alternative for the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS)/Glasgow Liege Scale (GLS) in the evaluation of consciousness in severely brain ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) has been proposed as an alternative for the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS)/Glasgow Liege Scale (GLS) in the evaluation of consciousness in severely brain-damaged patients. We compared the FOUR and GLS/GCS in intensive care unit patients who were admitted in a comatose state. METHODS: FOUR and GLS evaluations were performed in randomized order in 176 acutely (<1 month) brain-damaged patients. GLS scores were transformed in GCS scores by removing the GLS brainstem component. Inter-rater agreement was assessed in 20% of the studied population (N = 35). A logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, and etiology was performed to assess the link between the studied scores and the outcome 3 months after injury (N = 136). RESULTS: GLS/GCS verbal component was scored 1 in 146 patients, among these 131 were intubated. We found that the inter-rater reliability was good for the FOUR score, the GLS/GCS. FOUR, GLS/GCS total scores predicted functional outcome with and without adjustment for age and etiology. 71 patients were considered as being in a vegetative/unresponsive state based on the GLS/GCS. The FOUR score identified 8 of these 71 patients as being minimally conscious given that these patients showed visual pursuit. CONCLUSIONS: The FOUR score is a valid tool with good inter-rater reliability that is comparable to the GLS/GCS in predicting outcome. It offers the advantage to be performable in intubated patients and to identify non-verbal signs of consciousness by assessing visual pursuit, and hence minimal signs of consciousness (11% in this study), not assessed by GLS/GCS scales. [less ▲]

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See detailOnderneming en recht. Bedrijfsfiscaliteit
Peeters, Bart ULg

Book published by Knops Publishing (2011)

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See detailBespreking HvJ 18 maart 2010
Peeters, Bart ULg

in Rechtskundig Weekblad (2011)

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See detailTraumatologie du golf
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Crielaard, Jean-Michel ULg

Learning material (2011)

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See detailLa main de Gilliatt-Sumner ou le syndrome de défilé cervicothoracique neurogène vrai. A propos de sept cas opérés.
DUBUISSON, Annie ULg; NGUYEN KHAC, Minh-Tuan ULg; SCHOLTES, Félix ULg et al

in Neuro-Chirurgie (2011), 57(1), 9-14

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The clinical picture of hand atrophy related to a cervical rib or elongated C7 transverse process was well described in the modern literature by Gilliatt and Sumner; in 1970, they ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The clinical picture of hand atrophy related to a cervical rib or elongated C7 transverse process was well described in the modern literature by Gilliatt and Sumner; in 1970, they reported a series of nine patients whose motor status was stabilized following brachial plexus decompression. We report here seven patients suffering from thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS), who developed hand atrophy, sometimes because of diagnostic delay. METHODS: The patient's charts were analysed retrospectively. RESULTS: The seven patients were all female; the mean age was 43 years. The first complaints were arm pain and paresthesias lasting six months to 5 years. Three patients were treated with C56/C67 discectomy plus disc prosthesis (one patient), ulnar neurolysis at the elbow (the same patient), carpal tunnel release (one patient), and intravenous immunoglobulins (one patient) before TOS diagnosis. Hand atrophy, severe in five patients, was present at presentation. All patients underwent brachial plexus decompression by the anterior (four), posterior (two), or transaxillary (one) approach. This last approach was completed 18 months later by brachial plexus neurolysis via the anterior approach. Postoperatively, motor deficit was improved in two patients and stabilized in five patients. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians' unfamiliarity with TOS diagnosis or their reluctance to accept the diagnosis without electrical confirmation can lead to hand atrophy. Brachial plexus decompression at this stage usually stabilizes the deficit. [less ▲]

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See detailUnrelated cord blood transplantation in adults with myelodysplasia or secondary acute myeloblastic leukemia : a survey on behalf of Eurocord and CLWP of EBMT
Robin, M.; Sanz, G. F.; Ionescu, I. et al

in Leukemia : Official Journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K (2011), 25

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See detailReduction in incidence of vertebral fractures with once yearly zoledronic acid in men with osteoporosis
Boonen, S.; Kaufman, J. M.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2011), 26(S1), 23

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See detailMicrobial Diversity and Processes in Lake Kivu (East Africa)
Llirós, M.; Darchambeau, François ULg; Garcia-Armisen, T. et al

Conference (2011)

Lake Kivu is a deep meromictic and oligotrophic tropical African lake with a permanent thermal- and haline stratification with huge accumulations of dissolved CO2 and CH4 (ca. 300 km3 and 60 km3 ... [more ▼]

Lake Kivu is a deep meromictic and oligotrophic tropical African lake with a permanent thermal- and haline stratification with huge accumulations of dissolved CO2 and CH4 (ca. 300 km3 and 60 km3, respectively) in the deep anoxic monimolimnion (from 60 o 480 m depth). Although there are a wealth of information on the ecology of small eukaryotes and their trophic role on Kivu, available information on prokaryotic planktonic assemblages is scarce. Molecular analysis of archaeal and bacterial communities showed a vertical segregation imposed by the permanent redoxcline. In relation to Bacteria, Actinobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Green Sulfur Bacteria and Bacteroidetes were the most commonly retrieved groups. For Archaea, a marked dominance of Thaumarchaeota and Crenarchaeota (75% of all archaeal OTUs) over Euryarchaeota was observed. In the anoxic hypolimnion, Euryarchaoeta (Methanosarcinales and Methanocellales) lineages together with Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group phylotypes were mainly recovered. In turn, Thaumarchaeota phylotypes were recovered in oxic and suboxic waters. CARDFISH analyses over the first 100 m revealed the dominance of Bacteria (51.4% – 95.7% of DAPI-stained cells), especially Actinobacteria (epilimnion), Betaproteobacteria (oxic-anoxic interface) and Bacteroidetes (upper hypolimnion), over Archaea (1.0% – 4.5%; maximum abundances at the oxic-anoxic interface). In turn, flow cytometry evidenced the dominance of HNA cells in the euphotic layer, whereas the proportion of LNA cells increased with depth. HNA and LNA populations were still observed in the anoxic hypolimnion suggesting facultative or strict anaerobic metabolisms. The detection of distinct depth maxima of nitrate, nitrite, archaeal amoA and Marine Thaumarchaeota 16S gene copy numbers together with regularly detection of deep maxima of 3H-Thymidine uptake, and the presence of low-light adapted GSB species point towards a strong link of N, C, and S cycles in the redoxcline of Lake Kivu. [less ▲]

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See detailRisk Taking of Executives under Different Incentive Contracts: Experimental Evidence
Lefebvre, Mathieu ULg; Vieider, Ferdinand

E-print/Working paper (2011)

Classic financial agency theory recommends compensation through stock options rather than shares to induce risk neutrality in otherwise risk averse agents. In an experiment, we find that subjects acting ... [more ▼]

Classic financial agency theory recommends compensation through stock options rather than shares to induce risk neutrality in otherwise risk averse agents. In an experiment, we find that subjects acting as executives do also take risks that are excessive from the perspective of shareholders if compensated through options. Compensation through restricted company stock reduces the uptake of excessive risks. Even under stock-ownership, however, experimental executives continue to take excessive risks—a result that cannot be accounted for by classic incentive theory. We develop a basic model in which such risk-taking behavior is explained based on a richer array of risk attitudes derived from Prospect Theory. We use the model to derive hypotheses on what may be driving excessive risk taking in the experiment. Testing those hypotheses, we find that most of them are indeed borne out by the data. We thus conclude that a prospect-theory-based model is more apt at explaining risk attitudes under different compensation regimes than traditional principal-agent models grounded in expected utility theory. [less ▲]

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See detailDeforestation in Central and West Africa: landscape dynamics, anthropogenic effects and ecological consequences.
Barima, Y S S; Djibu, J P; Alongo, S et al

in Daniels, J A (Ed.) Advances in Environmental Research - Volume 7 (2011)

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