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See detailClosure to "Energy Dissipation and Turbulent Production in Weak Hydraulic Jumps" by E. Mignot and R. Cienfuegos
Mignot, E.; Peltier, Yann ULg; Cienfuegos, R.

in Journal of Hydraulic Engineering (2011), 137(8), 862-863

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See detailComparaison empirique des méthodes classiques de détection du fonctionnement différentiel d’items en psychométrie
Magis, David ULg; De Boeck, Paul; Raîche, Gilles

in Raîche, Gilles; Paquette-Côté, Karine; Magis, David (Eds.) Des mécanismes pour assurer la validité de l’interprétation de la mesure en éducation. Tome 1 : la mesure. (2011)

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See detailA partial hybrid stress solid-shell element for the analysis of laminated composites
Rah, Kamran; Van Paepegem, Wim; Habraken, Anne ULg et al

in Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineerinrg (2011), 200(49-52), 35263539

In this paper a low order partial hybrid stress solid-shell element based on the composite energy functional for the analysis of laminated composite structures is presented. This solid-shell element has ... [more ▼]

In this paper a low order partial hybrid stress solid-shell element based on the composite energy functional for the analysis of laminated composite structures is presented. This solid-shell element has eight nodes with only displacement degrees of freedoms, and three-dimensional constitutive models can be directly employed in the present formulation without any additional treatment. The assumed interlaminar stress field provides very accurate interlaminar stress calculation through the element thickness. These elements can be stacked on top of each other to model multilayer structures, fulfilling the interlaminar stress continuity at the interlayer surfaces and zero traction conditions on the top and bottom surfaces of the laminate. The present solid-shell does not show the transverse shear, trapezoidal and thickness locking phenomenon. [less ▲]

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See detailStable isotopes of captive Cetaceans (Killer Whales and Bottlenose dolphins)
Caut, Stéphane; Laran, Sophie; Garcia-Hartmann, Emmanuel et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2011), 214

There is currently a great deal of interest in using stable-isotope methods to investigate diet, trophic level and migration movement in wild cetaceans. Fundamental to the interpretation of these methods ... [more ▼]

There is currently a great deal of interest in using stable-isotope methods to investigate diet, trophic level and migration movement in wild cetaceans. Fundamental to the interpretation of these methods is the need to understand how diet isotopic values are reflected in consumer tissues. In this study, we investigated patterns of isotopic discrimination between diet and blood constituents of two species of cetaceans (killer whale, Orcinus orca and 19 bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncutus) fed with controlled diets during 350 days. Diet discrimination factors ( ) for plasma were estimated to 13C =2.3‰ and 1520 N =1.8‰ respectively for both species and to 13C =2.7‰ and 1521 N =0.5‰ for red blood cells (RBC). Delipidation had no significant effect on carbon and nitrogen isotopic values of blood constituents, confirming that cetacean blood no serving as reservoirs of lipids. In contrast, carbon isotopic values are higher in delipidated samples of blubber, liver and muscle of orca tissues. The mean half life for plasma was 32.9 days for killer whales and 27.2 days for bottlenose dolphin and for RBC was greater than 175 days. The potential for conflict between fisheries and cetaceans has heightened the need for trophic information about this taxa within those ecosystems. These results provide the first published stable isotope turnover rates and discrimination factors for cetaceans, which are essential if conclusions are to be drawn on issues concerning trophic structures, carbon sources and diet reconstruction. [less ▲]

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See detailCan environmental and socio-economic factors explain the recent emergence of Rift Valley Fever in Yemen, 2000-2001?
Abdo-Salem, S.; Tran, A.; Grosbois, V. et al

in Vector Borne & Zoonotic Diseases (2011), 11

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See detailApplication de l’optique non-linéaire à l’analyse des interactions peptide-monocouches à l’interface air-eau
Nasir, Mehmet Nail ULg; Benichou, Emmanuel; Brevet, Pierre-François et al

Scientific conference (2011)

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See detailCoping with Minority Status: Responses to Exclusion and Inclusion
Martiniello, Marco ULg

in Contemporary Sociology: a Journal of Reviews (2011), 40(2), 158-159

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See detailNotched Specimens Fracture Prediction with an Advanced GTN Model
Fansi Tchonko, Joseph ULg; Ben Bettaieb, Mohamed ULg; Balan, Tudor et al

in Key Engineering Materials [=KEM] (2011), 488-489

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See detailLa tradizione fiorentina della Supplicatione d’Italia al re di Francia. Con una nuova edizione critica
Moreno, Paola ULg

in Filologia e Critica (2011), XXXV(2), 1-33

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See detailRole of the Focal Adhesion Protein Kindlin-1 in Breast Cancer Growth and Lung Metastasis.
Sin, S.; Bonin, F.; Petit, V. et al

in Journal of the National Cancer Institute (2011), 103

Background Fermitin family member 1 (FERMT1, Kindlin-1) is an epithelial-specific regulator of integrin functions and is associated with Kindler syndrome, a genetic disorder characterized by skin ... [more ▼]

Background Fermitin family member 1 (FERMT1, Kindlin-1) is an epithelial-specific regulator of integrin functions and is associated with Kindler syndrome, a genetic disorder characterized by skin blistering, atrophy, and photosensitivity. However, the possible role of kindlin-1 in cancer remains unknown. Methods Kindlin-1 expression was quantified in several human cancers using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and published microarray datasets. The association between kindlin-1 expression and patient metastasis-free survival (N = 516) was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analyses. Effects of ectopic expression or silencing of kindlin-1 on cell signaling, migration, and invasion were assessed in human breast cancer cell lines using western blotting, immunofluorescence, wound healing assays, and invasion on Matrigel or type I collagen substrates. Breast tumor growth and lung metastasis were evaluated in 12-week-old female BALB/c mice (10 controls and six Kindlin-1-knockdown mice). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Kindlin-1 expression was consistently higher in tumors than in normal tissues in various cancer types metastasizing to the lungs, including colon and bladder cancer. Kindlin-1 expression was associated with metastasis-free survival in both breast and lung adenocarcinoma (breast cancer: hazard ratio of lung metastasis = 2.55, 95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.39 to 4.69, P = .001; lung cancer: hazard ratio of metastasis = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.25 to 3.07, P = .001). Overexpression of kindlin-1 induced changes indicating epithelial-mesenchymal transition and transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) signaling, constitutive activation of cell motility, and invasion (number of migrating cells, Kindlin-1 cells vs control, mean = 164.66 vs 19.00, difference = 145.6, 95% CI = 79.1 to 212.2, P = .004; invasion rate, Kindlin-1-cells vs control = 9.65% vs 1.92%, difference = 7.73%, 95% CI = 4.75 to 10.70, P < .001). Finally, Kindlin-1 depletion in an orthotopic mouse model statistically significantly inhibited breast tumor growth (P < .001) and lung metastasis (P = .003). Conclusion These results suggest a role for kindlin-1 in breast cancer lung metastasis and lung tumorigenesis and advance our understanding of kindlin-1 as a regulator of TGFbeta signaling, offering new avenues for therapeutic intervention against cancer progression. [less ▲]

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See detailL'esthétique phénoménologique de Husserl : une approche contrastée
Steinmetz, Rudy ULg

Book published by Kimé (2011)

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See detailEl monje y la hija del verdugo
Bierce, Ambrose; Willson, Patricia ULg

Book published by Libros del Zorro Rojo (2011)

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See detailUnpredictable photocatalytic ability of H2-reduced rutile-TiO2 xerogel in the degradation of dye-pollutants under UV and visible light irradiation
Páez Martínez, Carlos ULg; Lambert, Stéphanie ULg; Poelman, Dirk et al

Poster (2011)

Photocatalytic degradation of organic and inorganic pollutants on the TiO2 semiconductor has been extensively studied as a way to solve environmental problems relating to wastewater and polluted air ... [more ▼]

Photocatalytic degradation of organic and inorganic pollutants on the TiO2 semiconductor has been extensively studied as a way to solve environmental problems relating to wastewater and polluted air. Anatase and rutile are the most commonly used crystalline structures of TiO2, with anatase showing a higher photocatalytic activity attributed to its higher specific surface area and its favourable band gap energy (Eg). However, its high band gap (Eg = 3.2 eV) implies the use of UV light (lambda ≤ 380 nm) to inject electrons into the conduction band (TiO2(e-CB)) and to leave holes in the valence band (TiO2(h+VB)). Although the low band gap energy of rutile-TiO2 (Eg = 3.02 eV) allows rutile to potentially absorb more solar energy than anatase, the anatase-to-rutile phase transition leads to the collapse of the TiO2 specific surface area, which may result in a decrease in the photocatalytic activity of rutile. Low specific surface area and therefore poor absorption properties lead to strong limitations in exploring the photo-efficiency of rutile. Nevertheless, rutile has been proved to be comparable to anatase in its photoelectrochemical properties when used in dye-sensitized solar cells. In the present study, a new process for the reduction of rutile-TiO2 xerogel under hydrogen flow was developed to enhance the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 materials synthesized by the sol-gel process. So a series of H2-reduced TiO2 xerogels of low specific surface area was prepared by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraisopropoxy titanium(IV) in 2-methoxyethanol. The gels were dried under vacuum, calcined in air at different temperatures (400°C, 500°C and 700°C) and finally reduced in H2 at 400 °C. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FT-IR spectroscopy and UV/Visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The texture was determined by nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements. The effects of the calcination/reduction treatments on the adsorption of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution and on the photocatalytic degradation of MB and crystal violet (CV) under UV and visible light irradiation were also evaluated. Results showed predictable modifications in the physico-chemical properties caused by the annealing of TiO2 xerogel at high calcination temperature (700 °C), such as a total anatase-to-rutile phase transition and a considerable loss of specific surface area from 260 to 2 m2 g-1. However, the higher degree of reduction exhibited by the rutile-TiO2 lattice led to unpredictable photocatalytic activity for the dye conversion under UV and visible light irradiation: the loss of specific surface area of the rutile-TiO2 sample was compensated by the increase in the affinity of this sample for the dye. Under UV light irradiation, the rutile-TiO2 xerogel obtained after a calcination at 700 °C showed a similar level of photoactivity as the one obtained with anatase-TiO2 xerogels obtained by calcination at 400 °C and 500 °C. Under visible light, unlike anatase-TiO2 xerogels, the rutile-TiO2 xerogel showed a higher dye photoconversion rate per external surface area (40 times higher) than the commercial TiO2 Degussa P25. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain functional integration decreases during propofol-induced loss of consciousness.
Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Perlbarg, Vincent; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2011), 57(1), 198-205

Consciousness has been related to the amount of integrated information that the brain is able to generate. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that the loss of consciousness caused by propofol ... [more ▼]

Consciousness has been related to the amount of integrated information that the brain is able to generate. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that the loss of consciousness caused by propofol anesthesia is associated with a significant reduction in the capacity of the brain to integrate information. To assess the functional structure of the whole brain, functional integration and partial correlations were computed from fMRI data acquired from 18 healthy volunteers during resting wakefulness and propofol-induced deep sedation. Total integration was significantly reduced from wakefulness to deep sedation in the whole brain as well as within and between its constituent networks (or systems). Integration was systematically reduced within each system (i.e., brain or networks), as well as between networks. However, the ventral attentional network maintained interactions with most other networks during deep sedation. Partial correlations further suggested that functional connectivity was particularly affected between parietal areas and frontal or temporal regions during deep sedation. Our findings suggest that the breakdown in brain integration is the neural correlate of the loss of consciousness induced by propofol. They stress the important role played by parietal and frontal areas in the generation of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of the response of GFP microbial biosensors sensitive to substrate limitation in scale-down bioreactors
Delvigne, Frank ULg; Brognaux, Alison ULg; Gorret, Nathalie et al

in Biochemical Engineering Journal (2011), 55(2), 131-139

The dynamics of microbial stress response in intensive cultivation conditions remains not completely understood. In this work, two green fluorescent protein (GFP) transcriptional reporters have been used ... [more ▼]

The dynamics of microbial stress response in intensive cultivation conditions remains not completely understood. In this work, two green fluorescent protein (GFP) transcriptional reporters have been used as biosensors of the heterogeneities generated in a two-compartment scale-down reactor. The stress promoters have been chosen for their responsiveness to carbon limitation corresponding to the global substrate profiles encountered in intensive fed-batch cultures. From our results, it can be concluded that the exposure of microbial cells to substrates heterogeneities tends to decrease the GFP expression level in fed-batch mode. Fluorescence intensities have been monitored at the single cell level by using flow cytometry. During the course of the fed-batch culture, a drop at the level of the intracellular GFP content has been observed for the two scale-down operating conditions and for the two promoters sensitive to substrate limitation (rpoS and csiE). The fluorescence drop can be attributed to the repression of these promoters but also to the release of GFP to the extracellular medium according to the increase of the fluorescence level of the supernatant. This leakage has been observed for all the operating conditions, i.e. the scale-down reactors and the culture operating in the normal mode, i.e. in a well-mixed bioreactor. Interestingly, GFP leakage is more pronounced in the case of the cultures operated in the normal mode. Indeed, staining by propidium iodide tends to be more elevated for the microbial cells cultured under the normal mode by comparison with those cultured in scale-down conditions, indicating a higher permeability of the membrane. These results suggest that GFP microbial biosensors could be used to detect simultaneously mixing imperfections and their impact on the viability of microorganisms. [less ▲]

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See detailNew indications for radiotherapy: primary liver cancer and secondary liver oligometastases
JANVARY, Zsolt Levente ULg; JANSEN, Nicolas ULg; MARTINIVE, Philippe ULg et al

in Belgian Journal of Medical Oncology [=BJMO] (2011), 5(1), 8-13

Surgery is considered to be the standard treatment for intrahepatic malignancies, primary <br />cancers and metastatic lesions. However, a great many patients are not eligible for surgical <br ... [more ▼]

Surgery is considered to be the standard treatment for intrahepatic malignancies, primary <br />cancers and metastatic lesions. However, a great many patients are not eligible for surgical <br />intervention. Modern stereotactic radiotherapy has the potential to be an effective alternative <br />treatment modality with low toxicity for patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma <br />and liver oligometastases. In this paper we intend to review the current status and published <br />experiences in the field of liver irradiation. [less ▲]

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See detailEsophageal cancer surgery in patients older than 75: long term results.
HONORE, Charles ULg; Al-Azzeh, Ali ULg; GILSON, Nathalie ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2011), 111(1), 12-7

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate short and long term results after esophageal cancer resection in patients older than 75. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the database of esophageal ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate short and long term results after esophageal cancer resection in patients older than 75. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the database of esophageal cancer surgically treated in our department between January 2003 and December 2009 to identify patients older than 75. The preoperative, operative, postoperative and long term characteristics were analyzed. RESULTS: Among 137 patient, 23 were older than 75. The histological subtype was adenocarcinoma in 100%. The surgical techniques were a "Lewis-Santy" procedure in 43%, a trans-hiatal resection in 22%, a "Sweet" procedure in 13%, a stripping in 13% and a McKeown procedure in 9%. The in-hospital postoperative mortality was 13%. The in-hospital postoperative morbidity (Dindo-Clavien Grade >2, deceased patients included) was 26%. In univariate analysis, no statistically significant risk factor of morbidity was found. A Charlson Comorbidity Index >2 was, in univariate analysis, the sole risk factor of postoperative mortality (p = 0.0362). The mean hospital stay was 22 +/- 12 days. The median survival was 24.2 months. The 5-year overall survival was 39% and the 5-year disease free survival was 26%.57% of long-term deaths were not cancer related. CONCLUSION: Esophageal surgery performed in selected patients older than 75 has an acceptable morbidity and mortality but when a severe complication occurs, it leads to death in half of the cases. Surgery enables a long term survival benefit. This study confirmed our attitude of not considering age as a contra-indication for esophageal surgery but rather considering general status, self-reliance and associated comorbidities for patients' selection. [less ▲]

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See detailL’interleukine-1β augmente le catabolisme de la fibuline-3 par les chondrocytes : démonstration in vitro par la mesure des fragments Fib3-1 et Fib3-2
Gharbi, Myriam; Legrand, Catherine; Sanchez, Christelle ULg et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2011), 78(suppl 5), 131-132

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See detailCross-reactivity of 25-hydroxy vitamin D2 from different commercial immunoassays for 25-hydroxy vitamin D: an evaluation without spiked samples.
CAVALIER, Etienne ULg; WALLACE, A. Michael; CARLISI, Ignazia ULg et al

in Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine : CCLM / FESCC (2011), 49(3), 555-8

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