References of "2010"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailColoss Working Group 1: monitoring and diagnosis.
Nguyen, Bach Kim ULg; Van der zee, Romée; Vejsnaes, Flemming et al

in Journal of Apicultural Research (2010), 49(1), 97-99

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (21 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLa connaissance partielle chez le patient : pourquoi et comment la mesurer
Leclercq, Dieudonné ULg

in Education Thérapeutique du Patient [=ETP] = Therapeutic Patient Education [=TPE] (2010), 1(2), 201-212

Introduction: The certainty or the doubt, justified or not, a patient has in his knowledge about his illness influences largely his decision to act or, on the contrary, to verify, to ask for help ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The certainty or the doubt, justified or not, a patient has in his knowledge about his illness influences largely his decision to act or, on the contrary, to verify, to ask for help. Nevertheless, in the process of knowledge assessment, in patient education as well as in classical training systems, respondants are too rarely asked to provide, in addition to each answer to each question, a degree of certainty. Objectives: This paper explains how to collect these degrees of certainty, namely with the help of a spectral test applied in oral mode, and how to interpret and use these data in a formative perspective. Description:Metacognitive concepts and indices are developed and illustrated as well as graphical representations. Examples are provided in the domain of diabetic patients education. Conclusions: Spectral analysis of the responses’ qualities is useful to measure individual patients’ degree of mastery as well as to evaluate the efficacy of a training applied to a group of patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 289 (39 ULg)
See detailOceanic CO2 sink: the contribution of the marine cryosphere
Delille, Bruno ULg; Vancoppenolle, M.; Tilbrook, B. et al

Conference (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIII-V Devices for Advanced CMOS
Waldron, Niamh; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy ULg; Lin, Dennis et al

in 217th ECS Meeting (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailMulti-Months Cycles Observed in Climatic Data
Nicolay, Samuel ULg; Mabille, Georges ULg; Fettweis, Xavier ULg et al

in Simard, Suzanne (Ed.) Climate Change and Variability (2010)

Climatic variations happen at all time scales and since the origins of these variations are usually of very complex nature, climatic signals are indeed chaotic data. The identification of the cycles ... [more ▼]

Climatic variations happen at all time scales and since the origins of these variations are usually of very complex nature, climatic signals are indeed chaotic data. The identification of the cycles induced by the natural climatic variability is therefore a knotty problem, yet the knowing of these cycles is crucial to better understand and explain the climate (with interests for weather forecasting and climate change projections). Due to the non-stationary nature of the climatic time series, the simplest Fourier-based methods are inefficient for such applications (see e.g. Titchmarsh (1948)). This maybe explains why so few systematic spectral studies have been performed on the numerous datasets allowing to describe some aspects of the climate variability (e.g. climatic indices, temperature data). However, some recent studies (e.g. Matyasovszky (2009); Paluš & Novotná (2006)) show the existence of multi-year cycles in some specific climatic data. This shows that the emergence of new tools issued from signal analysis allows to extract sharper information from time series. Here, we use a wavelet-based methodology to detect cycles in air-surface temperatures obtained from worldwide weather stations, NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data, climatic indices and some paleoclimatic data. This technique reveals the existence of universal rhythms associated with the periods of 30 and 43 months. However, these cycles do not affect the temperature of the globe uniformly. The regions under the influence of the AO/NAO indices are influenced by a 30 months period cycle, while the areas related to the ENSO index are affected by a 43 months period cycle; as expected, the corresponding indices display the same cycle. We next show that the observed periods are statistically relevant. Finally, we consider some mechanisms that could induce such cycles. This chapter is based on the results obtained in Mabille & Nicolay (2009); Nicolay et al. (2009; 2010). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 81 (15 ULg)
See detailMolière au théâtre, les Médecins à la Ville
Andrien, Natacha; Jaminon, Martine ULg

Learning material (2010)

Plaquette de l'exposition - Perception de la médecine du 17ème siècle à travers l'oeuvre de Molière

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCombining remote sensing imagery of both fine and coarse spatial resolution to estimate crop evapotranspiration and quantifying its influence on crop growth monitoring
Sepulcre-Canto, Guadalupe; Gellens-Meulenberghs, Françoise; Arboleda, Alirio et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2010)

This study has been carried out in the framework of the GLOBAM -Global Agricultural Monitoring system by integration of earth observation and modeling techniques- project whose objective is to fill the ... [more ▼]

This study has been carried out in the framework of the GLOBAM -Global Agricultural Monitoring system by integration of earth observation and modeling techniques- project whose objective is to fill the methodological gap between the state of the art of local crop monitoring and the operational requirements of the global monitoring system programs. To achieve this goal, the research aims to develop an integrated approach using remote sensing and crop growth modeling. This paper concerns the use of MSG geostationnary satellite data for the calculation of Actual Evapotranspiration and its integration into a crop growth model. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFolding of class A beta-lactamases is rate-limited by peptide bond isomerization and occurs via parallel pathways.
Vandenameele, Julie ULg; Lejeune, Annabelle ULg; Di Paolo, Alexandre ULg et al

in Biochemistry (2010), 49(19), 4264-75

Class A beta-lactamases (M(r) approximately 29000) provide good models for studying the folding mechanism of large monomeric proteins. In particular, the highly conserved cis peptide bond between residues ... [more ▼]

Class A beta-lactamases (M(r) approximately 29000) provide good models for studying the folding mechanism of large monomeric proteins. In particular, the highly conserved cis peptide bond between residues 166 and 167 at the active site of these enzymes controls important steps in their refolding reaction. In this work, we analyzed how conformational folding, reactivation, and cis/trans peptide bond isomerizations are interrelated in the folding kinetics of beta-lactamases that differ in the nature of the cis peptide bond, which involves a Pro167 in the BS3 and TEM-1 enzyme, a Leu167 in the NMCA enzyme, and which is missing in the PER-1 enzyme. The analysis of folding by spectroscopic probes and by the regain of enzymatic activity in combination with double-mixing procedures indicates that conformational folding can proceed when the 166-167 bond is still in the incorrect trans form. The very slow trans --> cis isomerization of the Glu166-Xaa167 peptide bond, however, controls the final step of folding and is required for the regain of the enzymatic activity. This very slow phase is absent in the refolding of PER-1, in which the Glu166-Ala167 peptide bond is trans. The double-mixing experiments revealed that a second slow kinetic phase is caused by the cis/trans isomerization of prolines that are trans in the folded proteins. The folding of beta-lactamases is best described by a model that involves parallel pathways. It highlights the role of peptide bond cis/trans isomerization as a kinetic determinant of folding. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (14 ULg)
See detailL'architecture, producteur de "lien social' ou acteur dans les "luttes sociales"?
Brausch, Géraldine ULg

in Dassonville, Chantal; Cohen, Maurizio (Eds.) Architecture, Wallonie-Bruxelles. Inventaire #0 Inventories 2005-2010 (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHedge fund return specification with errors-in-variables
Coën, Alain; Hübner, Georges ULg; Desfleurs, Aurélie

in Journal of Derivatives and Hedge Funds (2010), 16(1), 22-52

In linear models for hedge fund returns, errors-in-variables may significantly alter the measurement of factor loadings and the estimation of abnormal performance. The higher moment estimator (HME ... [more ▼]

In linear models for hedge fund returns, errors-in-variables may significantly alter the measurement of factor loadings and the estimation of abnormal performance. The higher moment estimator (HME) introduced by Dagenais and Dagenais (1997) effectively deals with these issues. Results on individual funds show that the HME specification does not uncover systematic performance biases, but can modify estimated alphas in most cases and identifies relative persistence for directional funds in bearish market conditions. Overall, the risk premia calculated with HME remain relatively stable when compared to ordinary least squares specifications. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (3 ULg)
See detailEffect of Benchmark Misspecification on Risk-Adjusted Performance Measures
Bodson, Laurent ULg; Hübner, Georges ULg

in Gregoriou, Greg N.; Hoppe, Christian; Wehn, Carsten (Eds.) The Risk Modeling Evaluation Handbook (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 107 (26 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhy Protocolised care works in my unit?
Shaw, GM; Chase, JG; Pfeiffer, L et al

in Proceedings of the Australia-New Zealand Intensive Care Society Scientific Meeting (ANZICS 2010) (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailDeveloping Countries facing Global Warming: a Post-Kyoto Assessment.
De Dapper, Morgan; Swinne, Danielle; Ozer, Pierre ULg

Book published by United Nations / KAOW-ARSOM (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA new type of cubic-stacked layer structure in anthoinite, AlWO3(OH3)
Grey, I.; Madsen, I.; Mills et al

in American Mineralogist (2010), 95

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
See detailSketSha
Leclercq, Pierre ULg; Delfosse, Vincent ULg; Schroyen, Géraldine et al

Software (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 141 (29 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBiomolecules in multilayer film for antimicrobial and easy-cleaning stainless steel surface applications
Vreuls, Christelle ULg; Zocchi, Germaine ULg; Garitte, Geoffrey ULg et al

in Biofouling (2010), 26(6), 645-656

Microorganisms are able to attach to, grow on, and ultimately form biofilms on a large variety of surfaces, such as industrial equipment, food contact surfaces, medical implants, prostheses and operating ... [more ▼]

Microorganisms are able to attach to, grow on, and ultimately form biofilms on a large variety of surfaces, such as industrial equipment, food contact surfaces, medical implants, prostheses and operating rooms. Once organized into biofilms, bacteria are difficult to remove and kill, which increases the risk of cross-contamination and infection. One way to address the problem may thus be to develop antibacterial, anti-adhesion, ‘easy cleaning’ surfaces. In this study, stainless steel (SS) surfaces with antibacterial properties were created by embedding several antimicrobial peptides in a multilayer film architecture. The biocidal effect of these surfaces was demonstrated against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria according to two ISO tests. Also, coating SS surfaces with either mucin or heparin led to a reduction of <i>S. epidermidis</i> adhesion of almost 95% <i>vs</i> the bare substratum. Finally, by combining both antibacterial and anti-adhesion biomolecules in the same multilayer film, SS surfaces with better cleanability were produced. This surface coating property may help to delay the buildup of a dead bacterial layer which is known to progressively reduce exposure of the coating, leading to an undesirable decrease in the antibacterial effect of the surface. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (15 ULg)