References of "2009"
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See detailImpaired respiration discloses the physiological significance of state transitions in Chlamydomonas.
Cardol, Pierre ULg; Alric, Jean; Girard-Bascou, Jacqueline et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2009), 106(37), 15979-84

State transitions correspond to a major regulation process for photosynthesis, whereby chlorophyll protein complexes responsible for light harvesting migrate between photosystem II and photosystem I in ... [more ▼]

State transitions correspond to a major regulation process for photosynthesis, whereby chlorophyll protein complexes responsible for light harvesting migrate between photosystem II and photosystem I in response to changes in the redox poise of the intersystem electron carriers. Here we disclose their physiological significance in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using a genetic approach. Using single and double mutants defective for state transitions and/or mitochondrial respiration, we show that photosynthetic growth, and therefore biomass production, critically depends on state transitions in respiratory-defective conditions. When extra ATP cannot be provided by respiration, enhanced photosystem I turnover elicited by transition to state 2 is required for photosynthetic activity. Concomitant impairment of state transitions and respiration decreases the overall yield of photosynthesis, ultimately leading to reduced fitness. We thus provide experimental evidence that the combined energetic contributions of state transitions and respiration are required for efficient carbon assimilation in this alga. [less ▲]

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See detailTrain de pensées
Fournier, Bernard ULg

in Département de science politique (Ed.) Entre les murs - Un collage (2009)

Ce bref article, écrit dans le cadre d'un ouvrage présentant les membres du Département de science politique de l'ULg, fournit l'occasion de présenter quelques thèmes de recherche de l'Unité de ... [more ▼]

Ce bref article, écrit dans le cadre d'un ouvrage présentant les membres du Département de science politique de l'ULg, fournit l'occasion de présenter quelques thèmes de recherche de l'Unité de politologie générale. [less ▲]

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See detailUnderstanding of optical readout accuracy with micromechanical sensor cantilever monitored by surface plasmon resonanc
Hastanin, Juriy ULg; Renotte, Yvon ULg; Fleury-Frenette, Karl ULg et al

in Optics Communications (2009), 282

This paper reports a concept of micromechanical sensing of environmental condition using the surface plasmon resonance phenomenon. We calculate the resolution in the cantilever bending monitoring using ... [more ▼]

This paper reports a concept of micromechanical sensing of environmental condition using the surface plasmon resonance phenomenon. We calculate the resolution in the cantilever bending monitoring using the transfer matrix numerical method. We show that the cantilever deflection can be monitored with a resolution in the nanometer range. The SPs resonance behavior of the multilayer stack in the case of gold cantilever is discussed. We believe that this concept permits a low cost and ease of fabrication for a large bi-dimensional array of sensors with an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio. [less ▲]

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See detailAntigone et Manon s’invitent en droit social. Quelques propos sur la légalité de la preuve
Kefer, Fabienne ULg

in Revue Critique de Jurisprudence Belge (2009), 3

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See detailHybrid model for nowcasting and forecasting the K index
Kutiev, Ivan; Muhtarov, Plamen; Andonov, Borislav et al

in Journal of Atmospheric & Solar-Terrestrial Physics (2009), 71

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See detailAntibubbles, liquid onions and bouncing droplets
Vandewalle, Nicolas ULg; Terwagne, Denis ULg; Gilet, Tristan ULg et al

in Colloids and Surfaces A : Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects (2009), 344

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See detailCellular source and amount of vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor in tumors determine response to angiogenesis inhibitors.
Sennino, Barbara; Kuhnert, Frank; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg et al

in Cancer Research (2009), 69(10), 4527-36

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and their receptors are important targets in cancer therapy based on angiogenesis inhibition. However, it is unclear ... [more ▼]

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and their receptors are important targets in cancer therapy based on angiogenesis inhibition. However, it is unclear whether inhibition of VEGF and PDGF together is more effective than inhibition of either one alone. Here, we used two contrasting tumor models to compare the effects of inhibiting VEGF or PDGF alone, by adenovirally generated soluble receptors, to the effects of inhibiting both together. In RIP-Tag2 tumors, VEGF and PDGF inhibition together reduced tumor vascularity and abundance of pericytes. However, VEGF inhibition reduced tumor vascularity without decreasing pericyte density, and PDGF inhibition reduced pericytes without reducing tumor vascularity. By contrast, in Lewis lung carcinomas (LLC), inhibition of VEGF or PDGF reduced blood vessels and pericytes to the same extent as did inhibition of both together. Similar results were obtained using tyrosine kinase inhibitors AG-013736 and imatinib. In LLC, VEGF expression was largely restricted to pericytes and PDGF was largely restricted to endothelial cells, but, in RIP-Tag2 tumors, expression of both growth factors was more widespread and significantly greater than in LLC. These findings suggest that inhibition of PDGF in LLC reduced pericytes, and then tumor vessels regressed because pericytes were the main source of VEGF. The vasculature of RIP-Tag2 tumors, in which most VEGF is from tumor cells, was more resistant to PDGF inhibition. The findings emphasize the interdependence of pericytes and endothelial cells in tumors and the importance of tumor phenotype in determining the cellular effects of VEGF and PDGF inhibitors on tumor vessels. [less ▲]

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See detailLa traduction dans l'antiquité
Rochette, Bruno ULg

Article for general public (2009)

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See detailMaintenance, entretien et réparation des constructions en béton
Courard, Luc ULg

Learning material (2009)

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See detailContrastieve onderzoeksmodellen onder de loep
Rasier, Laurent ULg; Hiligsmann, Philippe

Conference (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 ULg)
See detailL'entrepreneur: ses caractéristiques et ses motivations
Surlemont, Bernard ULg; Janssen, Frank

in Janssen, Frank (Ed.) Entreprendre: une introduction à l'entrepreneuriat (2009)

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See detailMédiatiser ou médi-attiser le crime?
Dantinne, Michaël ULg

in Revue de la Faculté de Droit de l'Université de Liège (2009), 2

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See detailInnate lymphocytes in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cervical cancers
Renoux, V; Bisig, B; Thiry, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailEarly identification of inner pillar cells during rat cochlear development.
Thelen, Nicolas ULg; Breuskin, Ingrid ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg et al

in Cell & Tissue Research (2009), 337(1), 1-14

Although the structure of the auditory organ in mature mammals, the organ of Corti, is clearly established, its development is far from being elucidated. Here, we examine its spatio-temporal development ... [more ▼]

Although the structure of the auditory organ in mature mammals, the organ of Corti, is clearly established, its development is far from being elucidated. Here, we examine its spatio-temporal development in rats from embryonic day 16 (E16) to E19 by using cytochemical and immunocytochemical methods at the light- and electron-microscope levels. We demonstrate that the organ of Corti develops from a non-proliferating cell zone that is located in the junctional region between two edges of the dorsal epithelium of the cochlear duct. We also reveal that the first cells to develop in this zone are the inner pillar cells, a particular type of non-sensory supporting cell, which arise in the base of the cochlear duct at the boundary between the two ridges at E16. Cell differentiation in this prosensory region continues according to a base-to-apex gradient; the inner hair cells appear in the greater epithelial ridge at E17 and the outer hair cells in the lesser epithelial ridge at E18. At E19, the various cell types of the organ of Corti are in place. Finally, we show that unlike the development of all the supporting cell types of the organ of Corti, the development of inner pillar cells within the prosensory domain seems not to involve Notch1 activation. These results highlight the central role that the inner pillar cells probably play in the development of the organ of Corti. [less ▲]

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See detailImportance of steroid receptor coregulators for neuronal phenotype determination: Modulation of steroid action
Charlier, Thierry ULg

in Trabajos del Instituto Cajal (2009), LXXXII

Steroid receptors such as estrogen receptors alpha and beta and androgen receptors are transcription factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of a large number of target genes. Steroid-dependent ... [more ▼]

Steroid receptors such as estrogen receptors alpha and beta and androgen receptors are transcription factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of a large number of target genes. Steroid-dependent expression in the brain controls a large array of biological processes including spatial cognition, copulatory behavior and neuroprotection. The discovery of a competition, or squelching, between two different nuclear receptors introduced the notion that common cofactors might be involved in the modulation of transcriptional activity of nuclear receptors. These cofactors, which are now known as coactivators, are involved in chromatin remodeling and stabilization of the general transcription machinery. Since the characterization of the steroid receptor coactivator 1 or SRC-1, more than 100 different cofactors have been identified. Although an increasingly large amount of information has been collected about the in vitro function of these coregulatory proteins, relatively little is known regarding their physiological role in vivo, particularly in the brain. Our laboratory and others have demonstrated the importance of SRC-1 in the differentiation and activation of steroid-dependent sexual behaviors and the related neural genes. In Japanese quail, the inhibition of SRC-1 expression by intracerebroventricular antisense injections blocked the activating effects of exogenous testosterone on male sexual behaviors and the steroid-dependent vasotocine expression and increase of the median preoptic area volume defined by Nissl staining as well as by aromatase immunoreactivity. These data therefore strongly suggested that SRC-1 is required to modulate estrogen receptor dependent gene-expression. It is however interesting to note that steroid receptors and SRC-1 are not always colocalized. For example, both glial cells and neurons in the hippocampus express estrogen receptor alpha but SRC-1 is rarely observed in glia. It is therefore possible that estrogen receptor alpha in glial cell require another coactivator or set of coactivators to induce estrogen-dependent gene transcription. It has been suggested very recently that SRC-1 is associated with neuronal differentiation of neural stem cell derived from the ganglionic eminence of mouse embryos. These stem cells differentiating into glial cell (GFAP-positive) did not express SRC-1. The presence of a specific coactivator could therefore determine a specific cell phenotype (neuronal vs glial). Another coactivator, the coactivator-associated arginine methyl transferase 1 or CARM-1 seems to be important to keep progenitor cells in a dividing state. The inhibition of CARM-1 expression leads to neuronal differentiation. Neurogenesis can therefore offers an excellent model to define the spatio-temporal role of different coactivators. It is indeed possible to study a subset of coactivators associated to various stages phenotype determination (proliferation vs. differentiation). The study of neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in female adult rats shows that around 40 % of proliferative cells express SRC-1 or CARM-1. Interestingly, 70% of proliferative cells express SRC-1 but only a very few cells (<5%) express CARM-1. We are currently investigating the temporal pattern of expression of these two coactivators during the neurogenesis in the hilus and dentate gyrus. The expression of the coactivators CARM-1 and SRC-1 is analyzed in proliferating and differentiating cells. We expect that proliferating and differentiating cells will differentially express the two coactivators. It seems that the presence of a precise subset of coactivators could help defining the phenotype of the cell by modulating a specific downstream pathway after steroid receptor activation. The very large number of coactivators and their association into preformed complexes potentially allows the determination of hundreds of different phenotypes. The study of the expression of the coactivator and their function in vivo is required to fully understand steroid action and specificity in the brain. [less ▲]

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See detailPractical feeding of sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps)
Guillon, Leslie; Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg; Istasse, Louis ULg et al

in Mussa, P. P.; Nery, J.; Schiavone, A. (Eds.) et al Congress Proceedings 13t h Congress of the ESVCN (2009)

Communication relatant un essai d'alimentation pratique de sugar glider en captivité

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See detailSpecies and tissue-independent rapid regulation of aromatase activity by phosphorylations.
Charlier, Thierry ULg; Harada, Nobuhiro; Ball, Gregory F. et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2009)

Aromatase activity (AA) is rapidly inhibited in male quail brains, following expression of sexual behavior, activation of glutamatergic receptors or exposure to phosphorylating conditions. Questions ... [more ▼]

Aromatase activity (AA) is rapidly inhibited in male quail brains, following expression of sexual behavior, activation of glutamatergic receptors or exposure to phosphorylating conditions. Questions remain as to whether direct aromatase phosphorylation is the common key regulatory mechanism and whether these inhibitions are specific to quail hypothalamus. We now showed that AA is rapidly downregulated in quail ovary homogenates incubated in phosphorylating conditions, similarly to what is observed in hypothalamic homogenates. To understand the processes underlying this control, we expressed human aromatase in the human cell line HEK293 and 1) researched whether human aromatase can also be rapidly modulated by phosphorylations and 2) investigated more precisely the processes involved in this rapid control of activity. AA in HEK293 was rapidly inhibited following depolarization of intact cells with 100 mM KCl or in cell lysates exposed to phosphorylating conditions. Thus inhibition of AA in phosphorylating conditions is not unique to the quail hypothalamus neural environment but seems to be a general process. We are now defining the contribution of single residues of the aromatase protein to this enzymatic control. [less ▲]

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