References of "2008"
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See detailLa base de données du CIEL
Dozo, Björn-Olav ULg; Vanderpelen, Cécile

Conference (2008, December 04)

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See detailPiccole isole, mondi globali
Moreno, Paola ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2008)

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See detailTiO2 mesoporous thin films acting as photoelectrode in dye-sensitized solar cells
Dewalque, Jennifer ULg; Cloots, Rudi ULg; Henrist, Catherine ULg

Conference (2008, December 03)

This study aims at developing thin films of nanocrystalline, mesostructured titanium dioxide in order to build low cost and efficient photovoltaic devices. The synthesis is based on the Evaporation ... [more ▼]

This study aims at developing thin films of nanocrystalline, mesostructured titanium dioxide in order to build low cost and efficient photovoltaic devices. The synthesis is based on the Evaporation Induced-Self Assembly method using titanium isopropoxide as inorganic source, block copolymers as structuring and porogeneous agents and ethanol as solvent. The films were obtained by dip-coating various substrates in the solution. The influence of different experimental parameters, such as dip-coating and ageing relative humidity, withdrawal speed, surfactant:Ti ratio, substrate, was studied. The post-deposition thermal treatment had to be accurately adjusted in order to maximise the crystallisation of the inorganic network while avoiding the collapse of the porous mesostructure. The final structure obtained is discussed in the light of the XRD results combined with TEM analysis. Moreover the cell performance is limited by the film thickness which is mainly responsible of the small amount of absorbed light. Therefore a multilayer deposition process was studied and the as-obtained mesostructure was characterized by TEM, RBS and environmental ellipsometry. [less ▲]

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See detailExpertise relative à l'affaire HLMO/SONACA/SIEMENS/MUTUELLE DU MANS - Conclusions
Debongnie, Jean-François ULg

Report (2008)

La SONACA a acheté une machine-outil de grandes dimensions au constructeur français HLMO. Elle se plaint de graves dysfonctionnements. La Mutuelle du Mans intervient comme assureur et Siemens en tant que ... [more ▼]

La SONACA a acheté une machine-outil de grandes dimensions au constructeur français HLMO. Elle se plaint de graves dysfonctionnements. La Mutuelle du Mans intervient comme assureur et Siemens en tant que fabricant des moteurs linéaires. Cette expertise a duré cinq ans. [less ▲]

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See detailHypertension artérielle et alimentation
Krzesinski, Jean-Marie ULg

Conference (2008, December 02)

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See detailMethods of sensory evaluation of odour and 50 m3 test facility at Arlon laboratory
Romain, Anne-Claude ULg; Nicolas, Jacques ULg; Degraeve, Ch

Diverse speeche and writing (2008)

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See detailThe Degree of Correlation of Jovian and Saturnian Auroral Emissions With Solar Wind Conditions
Clarke, J. T.; Nichols, J.; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

Conference (2008, December 01)

While the terrestrial aurorae are known to be driven primarily by the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind, auroral emissions on Jupiter and Saturn are thought to be driven ... [more ▼]

While the terrestrial aurorae are known to be driven primarily by the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind, auroral emissions on Jupiter and Saturn are thought to be driven primarily by internal processes, with the main energy source being the planets' rapid rotation. Limited evidence has suggested there might be some influence of the solar wind on Jupiter's aurorae, and indicated that auroral storms on Saturn can occur at times of solar wind pressure increases. To investigate in detail the dependence of auroral processes on solar wind conditions, a large campaign of observations of these planets has been undertaken using the Hubble Space Telescope, in association with measurements from planetary spacecraft and solar wind conditions both propagated from one AU and measured near each planet. The data indicate a consistent brightening of both the auroral emissions and Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) at Saturn close in time to the arrival of solar wind shocks and pressure increases, consistent with a direct physical relationship between Saturnian auroral processes and solar wind conditions. This correlation has been strengthened by the final campaign observations in Feb. 2008. At Jupiter the situation is less clear, with increases in total auroral power seen near the arrival of solar wind forward shocks, while little increase has been observed near reverse shocks. In addition, auroral dawn storms have been observed when there was little change in solar wind conditions. The data are consistent with some solar wind influence on some Jovian auroral processes, while the auroral activity also varies independently of the solar wind. This extensive data set will serve to constrain theoretical models for the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailIntérêt de l'évaluation de l'efficacité d'une prise en charge
Adam, Stéphane ULg

Conference (2008, December 01)

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See detailLong-term Brightness Variations of the Io UV Footprint
Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

Conference (2008, December 01)

Since the finding of the UV Io footprint in 1996, the successive UV instruments on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) allowed us to considerably improve the understanding of the Io-Jupiter electro ... [more ▼]

Since the finding of the UV Io footprint in 1996, the successive UV instruments on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) allowed us to considerably improve the understanding of the Io-Jupiter electro-magnetic interaction and its auroral counterpart. It has been shown that the Io footprint is generally formed by one bright spot preceded or followed by secondary spots whose relative positions are linked to the location of Io in the plasma torus. We also know that these spots experience brightness variations from minutes to hours. The Io footprint brightness varies over hours with the longitude of Io in the Jovian magnetic field (System III longitude) but until recently, huge gaps existed in the longitude coverage. Part of these gaps has now been filled during the latest HST imaging campaign and a more complete spot brightness versus Io System III longitude diagram emerges. Additionally, we compare spot brightness between images obtained a few minutes apart but from opposite hemispheres. Based on images gathered from 1997 to 2007 with the STIS and the ACS cameras, we also show that the footprint morphology and the spots brightness, including their relative brightness, can vary significantly from one year to another. Finally, we discuss the brightness variations from hours to years in terms of plasma torus density and position of Io in the plasma torus as well as in Jovian magnetic field. [less ▲]

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See detailSpectroscopic observations of pulsating stars
Aerts, C.; Briquet, Maryline ULg; Carrier, F. et al

in Communications in Asteroseismology (2008), 157

During the past three decades, astronomers have been gathering extensive time series of high- precision spectroscopy of pulsating stars. In contrast to one-shot spectra, which provide the fundamental ... [more ▼]

During the past three decades, astronomers have been gathering extensive time series of high- precision spectroscopy of pulsating stars. In contrast to one-shot spectra, which provide the fundamental parameters, time-resolved spectroscopy offers a much broader variety of input for asteroseismology. The most important applications encompass the determination of the radial-velocity amplitudes and phases of the modes, the detection of modes that are invisible in photometry, the identification of the azimuthal orders through specialised methodology, the unravelling of pulsational and orbital motions, and, since a few years, the detection of solar-like oscillations in various types of stars. We discuss the input that spectroscopic time series can provide for asteroseismic modelling, for various types of pulsators. We end with some future prospects of how spectroscopy can help to push seismic applications beyond the present achievements. [less ▲]

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See detailSaturn Auroral Movies from Cassini UVIS
Pryor, W. R.; Stewart, I.; Esposito, L. et al

Conference (2008, December 01)

Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has completed four years of study of Saturn's atmosphere and auroras. Two long slit spectral channels are used to obtain EUV data from 56.3-118.2 nm and ... [more ▼]

Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has completed four years of study of Saturn's atmosphere and auroras. Two long slit spectral channels are used to obtain EUV data from 56.3-118.2 nm and FUV data from 111.5-191.3 nm. 64 spatial pixels along each slit are combined with slit motion to construct spectral images of Saturn. Auroral emissions are seen from electron-excited molecular and atomic hydrogen. In 2008 UVIS obtained data with the spacecraft well out of Saturn's ring plane, permitting UVIS to obtain a number of short movies of the rotating auroral structures. In some movies a cusp-like feature is present near noon inside the oval. One movie from 2008 day 201 shows parallel linear features on the day side almost at right angles to the main auroral oval that appear, then lengthen, separate in the middle, and then fade away. The same movie also shows one bright "polar flare" inside the oval. A few of the most recent images were obtained at sufficiently close range that 2 spacecraft slews were needed to completely cover the oval. These images provide almost 100 pixels of information across the oval and clearly show multiple arcs of emission on the main oval and scattered emissions inside the oval. We will discuss these features, their locations, and possible interpretations. [less ▲]

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See detailActin-targeting natural compounds as tools to study the role of actin cytoskeleton in signal transduction.
Kustermans, Gaëlle ULg; Piette, Jacques ULg; Legrand, Sylvie ULg

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2008), 76(11)

Actin cytoskeleton controls a vast range of cellular processes such as motility, cytokinesis, differentiation, vesicle transport, phagocytosis, muscle contraction. A growing literature clearly ... [more ▼]

Actin cytoskeleton controls a vast range of cellular processes such as motility, cytokinesis, differentiation, vesicle transport, phagocytosis, muscle contraction. A growing literature clearly demonstrated that actin cytoskeleton can play a regulating role in several signalling pathways. Cells tightly regulate actin dynamics through numerous specific proteins in order to rapidly and locally respond to various stimuli. An obvious approach to determine the involvement of actin cytoskeleton in signalling pathways is the use of actin-targeting natural compounds. These drugs modulate actin dynamics, accelerating either polymerization or depolymerization, through various mechanisms. This review focus on the use of these actin-targeting drugs as tools to demonstrate the role of actin cytoskeleton in several signal transduction pathways such as those initiated from antigen receptor in T and B cells or those involving mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) or transcription factors NF-kB and SRF (serum response factor). In this last case (SRF), the use of various actin-targeting drugs participated in the elucidation of the molecular mechanism by which actin regulates SRF-mediated transcription. [less ▲]

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See detailPreliminary seismic study of the gamma Doradus COROT target HD 49434
Bouabid, M.-P.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Miglio, Andrea ULg et al

in Communications in Asteroseismology (2008), 157

Not Available

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See detailCharacteristics of Saturn's polar atmosphere and auroral electrons derived from HST/STIS, FUSE and Cassini/UVIS spectra
Gustin, Jacques ULg; Pryor, W.; Feldman, P. et al

Poster (2008, December 01)

Ultraviolet spectra of Saturn's aurora obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS), the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic ... [more ▼]

Ultraviolet spectra of Saturn's aurora obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS), the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) have been compared to synthetic spectra of electron-excited H2 in order to derive various auroral characteristics, such as the energy of the primary precipitating electrons and the H2 temperature at the altitude of the aurora. Two physical processes have been exploited: the absorption by hydrocarbons in the FUV and H2 self-absorption in the EUV. We find energies in the range 10-18 keV, which locates Saturns's aurora between 0.1 and 0.3 μ bar. We also determined that the auroral H2 emission is characterized by a temperature of ~400K, consistent with temperatures measured in the infrared, but much higher than what is expected from equatorial atmospheric models. These new results bring valuable constraints on both polar atmospheric models and theoretical studies of the ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling. [less ▲]

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See detailModeling stochastic excitation of acoustic modes in stars: present status and perspectives
Samadi, R.; Belkacem, Kevin ULg; Goupil, M*-J et al

in Communications in Asteroseismology (2008), 157

Solar-like oscillations have now been detected for more than ten years and their frequencies measured for a still growing number of stars with various characteristics (e.g. mass, chemical composition ... [more ▼]

Solar-like oscillations have now been detected for more than ten years and their frequencies measured for a still growing number of stars with various characteristics (e.g. mass, chemical composition, evolutionary stage ...). Excitation of such oscillations is attributed to turbu- lent convection and takes place in the uppermost part of the convective envelope. Since the pioneering work of Goldreich & Keely (1977), more sophisticated theoretical models of stochastic excitation were developed, which differ from each other both by the way turbulent convection is modeled and by the assumed sources of excitation. We briefly review here the different underlying approximations and assumptions of those models. A second part shows that computed mode excitation rates crucially depend on the way time-correlations between eddies are described but also on the surface metal abundance of the star. [less ▲]

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See detailPulsational analysis of the Herbig Ae star HD 140237
Fumel, Aurélie ULg; Böhm, Torsten

in Communications in Asteroseismology (2008), 157

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See detailProblems and prospects in stellar physics
Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg

in Communications in Asteroseismology (2008), 157

Main difficulties and uncertainties in stellar physics originate in the modelling of convection, microscopic and macroscopic transport mechanisms and rotation. I consider each of these physical aspects ... [more ▼]

Main difficulties and uncertainties in stellar physics originate in the modelling of convection, microscopic and macroscopic transport mechanisms and rotation. I consider each of these physical aspects, with a particular attention to their possible probe by asteroseismology. Another important question about opacities is considered by Montalban & Miglio (2008). [less ▲]

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See detailThe Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) on Juno
Gladstone, G. R.; Persyn, S.; Eterno, J. et al

Conference (2008, December 01)

Juno, a NASA New Frontiers mission, plans for launch in August 2011, a 5-year cruise (including a flyby of Earth in October 2013 for a gravity boost), and 14 months around Jupiter after arriving in August ... [more ▼]

Juno, a NASA New Frontiers mission, plans for launch in August 2011, a 5-year cruise (including a flyby of Earth in October 2013 for a gravity boost), and 14 months around Jupiter after arriving in August 2016. The spinning (2 RPM), solar-powered Juno will study Jupiter from a highly elliptical orbit, in which the spacecraft (for about 6 hours once every 11 days) dives down over the north pole, skims the outermost atmosphere, and rises back up over the south pole. This orbit allows Juno avoid most of the intense particle radiation surrounding the planet and provides an excellent platform for investigating Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. Part of the exploration of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere will involve remote sensing of the far-ultraviolet H and H2 auroral emissions, plus gases such as methane and acetylene which add their absorption signature to the H2 emissions. This hydrocarbon absorption can be used to estimate the energy of the precipitating electrons; since more energetic electrons penetrate deeper into the atmosphere and the UV emissions they produce will show more absorption. Juno will carry an Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) to make spectral images of Jupiter's aurora. UVS is a UV imaging spectrograph sensitive to both extreme and far ultraviolet emissions in the 70-205~nm range that will characterize the morphology and spectral nature of Jupiter's auroral emissions. Juno UVS consists of two separate sections: a dedicated telescope/spectrograph assembly and a vault electronics box. The telescope/spectrograph assembly contains a telescope which feeds a 0.15-m Rowland circle spectrograph. The telescope has an input aperture 40à 40~mm2 and uses an off-axis parabolic primary mirror. A flat scan mirror situated at the front end of the telescope (used to target specific auroral features at up to ±30° perpendicular to the Juno spin plane) directs incoming light to the primary. The light is then focused onto the spectrograph entrance slit, which has a 'dog- bone' shape 6° long, in three 2° sections of 0.2°, 0.05°, and 0.2° width (projected onto the sky). Light entering the slit is dispersed by a toroidal grating which focuses the UV bandpass onto a curved microchannel plate (MCP) cross delay line (XDL) detector with a solar blind UV- sensitive CsI photocathode, which makes up the instrument's focal plane. Tantalum shielding surrounds the detector assembly to protect the detector and the adjacent detector electronics from high-energy electrons. The main electronics box is located in the Juno vault. Inside are two redundant high-voltage power supplies (HVPS), two redundant low-voltage power supplies, the command and data handling (C&DH) electronics, heater/actuator activation electronics, scan mirror electronics, and event processing electronics. An overview of the UVS design and scientific performance will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailThe driving mechanism of roAp stars : effects of global metallicity
Theado, S.; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg; Noels-Grötsch, Arlette ULg

in Communications in Asteroseismology (2008), 157

We have investigated the influence of global metallicity on the excitation mechanism of roAp star pulsations. Our computations show that the opacity in the driving region of the roAp modes is strongly ... [more ▼]

We have investigated the influence of global metallicity on the excitation mechanism of roAp star pulsations. Our computations show that the opacity in the driving region of the roAp modes is strongly sensitive to the metal content but surprisingly the roAp theoretical instability strip is only weakly affected by metallicity changes. [less ▲]

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