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See detailThe Minimal Fusion Peptide Of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Corresponds To The 11 First Residues Of Gp32
Lorin, A.; Lins, Laurence ULg; Stroobant, V. et al

in Journal of Peptide Science (2008), 14(4), 423-8

We had previously predicted successfully the minimal fusion peptides (FPs) of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) gp41 and the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) gp30 using an original approach based on ... [more ▼]

We had previously predicted successfully the minimal fusion peptides (FPs) of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) gp41 and the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) gp30 using an original approach based on the obliquity/fusogenicity relationship of tilted peptides. In this paper, we have used the same method to predict the shortest FP capable of inducing optimal fusion in vitro of the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) mac isolate and of other SIVs and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-2) isolates. In each case, the 11-residue-long peptide was predicted as the minimal FP. For the SIV mac isolate, liposome lipid-mixing and leakage assays confirmed that this peptide is the shortest peptide inducing optimal fusion in vitro, being therefore the minimal FP. These results are another piece of evidence that the tilted properties of FPs are important for the fusion process and that our method can be used to predict the minimal FPs of other viruses. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the Quantum Potential and Pulsating Wave Packet in the Harmonic Oscillator
Dubois, Daniel ULg

in Dubois, Daniel (Ed.) COMPUTING ANTICIPATORY SYSTEMS (2008)

A fundamental mathematical formalism related to the Quantum Potential factor, Q, is presented in this paper. The Schrödinger equation can be transformed to two equations depending on a group velocity and ... [more ▼]

A fundamental mathematical formalism related to the Quantum Potential factor, Q, is presented in this paper. The Schrödinger equation can be transformed to two equations depending on a group velocity and a density of presence of the particle. A factor, in these equations, was called “Quantum Potential” by D. Bohm and B. Hiley. In 1999, I demonstrated that this Quantum Potential, Q, can be split in two Quantum Potentials, Q1, and Q2, for which the relation, Q=Q1+Q2, holds. These two Quantum Potentials depend on a fundamental new variable, what I called a phase velocity, u, directly related to the probability density of presence of the wave-particle, given by the modulus of the wave function. This paper gives some further developments for explaining the Quantum Potential for oscillating and pulsating Gaussian wave packets in the Harmonic Oscillator. It is shown that the two Quantum Potentials play a central role in the interpretation of quantum mechanics. A breakthrough in the formalism of the Quantum Mechanics could be provoked by the physical properties of these Quantum Potentials. The probability density of presence of the oscillating and pulsating Gaussian wave packets in the Harmonic Oscillator is directly depending on the ratio Q2/Q1 of the two Quantum Potentials. In the general case, the energy of these Gaussian wave packets is not constant, but is oscillating. The energy is given by the sum of the kinetic energy, T, the potential energy, V, and the two Quantum Potentials: E=T+V+Q1+Q2. For some conditions, given in the paper, the energy can be a constant. The first remarkable result is the fact that the first Quantum Potential, Q1, is related to the ground state energy, E0, of the Quantum Harmonic Oscillator: Q1=[barred aitch]omega/2=E0. The second result is related to the property of the second Quantum Potential, Q2, which plays the role of an anti-potential, Q2=-V(x), where V is the harmonic oscillator potential. This Quantum Potential counter-balances the harmonic oscillator potential, so there is no more harmonic potential in the quantum harmonic oscillator. It remains just a constant potential given by the first Quantum Potential, Q1. The interpretation is as follows: a quantum system can annihilate a classical potential, and so gives rise to a quantum tunnelling, which violates the principles of Classical Mechanics. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of the Slow-Flow Dynamics of Transonic Aeroelastic Response from Time-Series Data
Lee, Y. S.; Vakakis, Alexander F.; McFarland, D. M. et al

in 45th Technical Meeting of the Society of Engineering Science, Urbana Champaign, 2008 (2008)

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See detailMaya blue-green pigments found in Calakmul, Mexico: a study by Raman and UV-visible spectroscopy
Moreno, Renata Garcia; Strivay, David ULg; Gilbert, Bernard ULg

in Journal Of Raman Spectroscopy (2008), 39(8), 1050-1056

After more than two decades of fieldwork in the Maya archaeological site of Calakmul, Mexico, numerous remnants of blue and green pigments have been reported on wall paintings, as well as on funerary ... [more ▼]

After more than two decades of fieldwork in the Maya archaeological site of Calakmul, Mexico, numerous remnants of blue and green pigments have been reported on wall paintings, as well as on funerary paraphernalia, such as masks, miniatures and vases. The importance of these pigments is linked to the sacred values that Maya people associate with blue and green colours since pre-Columbian times. These hues symbolise water, and are therefore associated with fertility and regeneration. This paper aims to perform a survey of the blue and green pigments used in the Early Classic and Late Classic periods in Calakmul (300-850 A.D.), in order to have a better understanding of their chemical composition and origin. Analyses were performed on microsamples using Raman and UV-visible spectroscopies to evaluate the possibilities that these techniques can offer in future in situ researches on Mesoamerican archaeological materials and objects. With these analyses, we have documented a large blue-green chromatic palette, which includes the earliest Blue Maya and Green Maya known to date, as well as malachite, pseudomalachite and an unknown-up-to-now blue-green mineral pigment, veszelyite, used specifically for ritual objects. The results indicate a careful selection of imported products and the mastering of a complex ancient Maya pictorial tradition. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailRectification effects in superconductors with magnetic pinning centers
Silhanek, Alejandro ULg; Verellen, N.; Metlushko, V. et al

in Physica C: Superconductivity (2008), 468(7-10), 563-567

We investigate the dynamics and pinning properties of vortices in superconducting At films deposited on top of a close-packed array of Py microsized. loops by electrical transport measurements. The ... [more ▼]

We investigate the dynamics and pinning properties of vortices in superconducting At films deposited on top of a close-packed array of Py microsized. loops by electrical transport measurements. The micromagnets have an in-plane magnetic moment that can be set in different magnetic states by applying an external field parallel to the plane of the pattern. When the loops are set in the magnetic vortex-state, for which the stray field is the smallest, a weaker pinning in comparison with the polarized states (i.e. strong stray field) is observed. In addition, a clear influence of the chosen magnetic state of the Py rings on the dynamics of the vortex motion under an ac-excitations is obtained. When the magnetic elements are in the as-grown state a rectification signal which reverses sign when the field changes polarity is observed. In contrast to that, when the array of loops is magnetized the observed rectification effect is independent of the field polarity and can be reversed by reorienting the magnetization of the micromagnets. (c) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailLa peau et ses principales neurocristopathies.
Quatresooz, Pascale ULg; Vandenbossche, Géraldine ULg; Pierard, Claudine ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63(5-6), 354-8

The neurocristopathies encompass genetic disorders targeting some structures originating from the neural crest development. Hence, skin is affected by some clinical manifestations of these disorders. This ... [more ▼]

The neurocristopathies encompass genetic disorders targeting some structures originating from the neural crest development. Hence, skin is affected by some clinical manifestations of these disorders. This review covers the main aspects found in neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, incontinentia pigmenti, neurocutaneous melanoblastosis, basal cell naevomatosis and the epidermal naevus syndrome. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficient targeted energy transfers in coupled nonlinear oscillators through 1:1 transcient resonance captures:
Sapsis, Themistoklis; Quinn, D. Dane; Gendelman, Oleg et al

in Sixth EUROMECH Nonlinear Dynamics Conference, Saint Petersbourg, 2008 (2008)

We study targeted energy transfer (TET) in a two degree-of-freedom damped system caused by 1:1 transient resonance capture (TRC). The system consists of a linear oscillator strongly coupled to an ... [more ▼]

We study targeted energy transfer (TET) in a two degree-of-freedom damped system caused by 1:1 transient resonance capture (TRC). The system consists of a linear oscillator strongly coupled to an essentially nonlinear attachment. First, we study the underlying structure of the Hamiltonian dynamics of the system, and then show that, for sufficiently small values of viscous damping, the nonlinear damped transitions are strongly influenced by the underlying topological structure of periodic and quasiperiodic orbits of the hamiltonian system. Then, a detailed computational study of the different types of nonlinear transitions that occur in the weakly damped system is presented. As a result of these studies, conditions that lead to effective or even optimal TET from the linear system to the nonlinear attachment are determined. Finally, direct analytical treatment of the governing strongly nonlinear damped equations of motion is performed through slow/fast partition of the transient responses, in order to analytically model the dynamics the region of optimal TET, and to determine the characteristic time scales of the dynamics that influence the capacity of the nonlinear attachment to passively absorb and locally dissipate broadband energy from the linear oscillator. [less ▲]

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See detailParodie et autoparodie dans Exercices de style de Raymond Queneau
Goto, Kanako ULg

in Gaudard, François-Charles (Ed.) Champs du signe : DuBellay, Diderot, Verlaine, Gracq, Dossier Raymond Queneau (2008)

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See detailYakubovich’s Oscillatority of Circadian Oscillations Models
Efimov, Denis ULg; Fradkov, Alexander

in Mathematical Biosciences (2008), 216

The testing procedure of Yakubovich’s oscillatority property is presented. The procedure is applied for two models of circadian oscillations [10], [11]. Analytical conditions of these models oscillatority ... [more ▼]

The testing procedure of Yakubovich’s oscillatority property is presented. The procedure is applied for two models of circadian oscillations [10], [11]. Analytical conditions of these models oscillatority are established and bounds on oscillation amplitude are calculated. [less ▲]

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See detailSecreted subtilisins of Microsporum canis are involved in adherence of arthroconidia to feline corneocytes.
Baldo, Aline ULg; Tabart, Jeremy; Vermout, Sandy et al

in Journal of Medical Microbiology (2008), 57(Pt 9), 1152-1156

Microsporum canis is a pathogenic fungus that causes a superficial cutaneous infection called dermatophytosis, mainly in cats and humans. The mechanisms involved in adherence of M. canis to epidermis have ... [more ▼]

Microsporum canis is a pathogenic fungus that causes a superficial cutaneous infection called dermatophytosis, mainly in cats and humans. The mechanisms involved in adherence of M. canis to epidermis have never been investigated. Here, a model was developed to study the adherence of M. canis to feline corneocytes through the use of a reconstructed interfollicular feline epidermis (RFE). In this model, adherence of arthroconidia to RFE was found to be time-dependent, starting at 2 h post-inoculation and still increasing at 6 h. Chymostatin, a serine protease inhibitor, inhibited M. canis adherence to RFE by 53%. Moreover, two mAbs against the keratinolytic protease subtilisin 3 (Sub3) inhibited M. canis adherence to RFE by 23%, suggesting that subtilisins, and Sub3 in particular, are involved in the adherence process. [less ▲]

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See detailFactors affecting the response to the specific treatment of several forms of clinical anestrus in high producing dairy cows
Lopez-Gatius, F.; Mirzaei, A.; Santolaria, P. et al

in Theriogenology (2008), 69

This study was designed to examine estrous response rates to the therapeutic treatment of clinical anestrus in high producing dairy cows and to identify the factors that could affect these rates. Cows ... [more ▼]

This study was designed to examine estrous response rates to the therapeutic treatment of clinical anestrus in high producing dairy cows and to identify the factors that could affect these rates. Cows with silent ovulation (Subestrus group), cystic ovarian disease (Cyst group) or ovarian hypofunction (OH group) were given specific treatment for their disorder. Data were derived from 1764 treatments in cows producing a mean of 45.4 kg of milk upon treatment including: 889 subestrous cows, 367 cystic cows and 508 cows with ovarian hypofunction. Cows showing estrus following treatment exhibited a similar pregnancy rate to cows attaining natural estrus used as reference: 33% (337/1006) and 35% (626/1796), respectively. No significant ifferences in pregnancy rates were observed among the Subestrus, Cyst and OH groups (34% (196/571), 34% (44/130), 32% (97/305), respectively. Based on the odds ratio, an estrous response for all groups was less likely to occur in cows that had suffered previous anestrus, compared to cows that were anestrous for the first time, whereas the likelihood of an estrous response increased in cows treated after 90 days in milk. Our results indicate that previous anestrus and a late stage of lactation can have a negative and positive effect, respectively, on the estrous response to the specific treatment of clinical anestrus shown by high producing dairy cows. Treatment targeted at each type of clinical anestrus can render similar pregnancy rates to those shown by cows in natural estrus. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of symptomatic slow-acting drugs in osteoarthritis using the GRADE system.
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Burlet, Nansa; Delmas, Pierre D et al

in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders (2008), 9

BACKGROUND: Symptomatic slow-acting drugs (SYSADOA) have been largely studied over the last decade. The objective of this study is to prepare a document providing recommendations for the use of SYSADOA in ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Symptomatic slow-acting drugs (SYSADOA) have been largely studied over the last decade. The objective of this study is to prepare a document providing recommendations for the use of SYSADOA in osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: The following interventions were taken into consideration: avocado/soybean unsaponifiables, chondroitin sulfate, diacereine, glucosamine sulfate, hyaluronic acid, oral calcitonin, risedronate, strontium ranelate. Recommendations were based on the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. The GRADE system is based on a sequential assessment of the quality of evidence, followed by assessment of the balance between benefits versus downsides and subsequent judgment about the strength of recommendations. RESULTS: Chondroitin sulfate, diacereine, glucosamine sulfate, avocado/soybean unsaponifiables and hyaluronic acid have demonstrated pain reduction and physical function improvement with very low toxicity, with moderate to high quality evidence. Even if pre-clinical data and some preliminary in vivo studies have suggested that oral calcitonin and strontium ranelate could be of potential interest in OA, additional well-designed studies are needed. CONCLUSION: In the benefit/risk ratio, the use of chondroitin sulfate, diacereine, glucosamine sulfate, avocado/soybean unsaponifiables and hyaluronic acid could be of potential interest for the symptomatic management of OA. [less ▲]

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See detailIn Unordnung erstarrt
Schlagheck, Peter ULg; Richter, K.

Article for general public (2008)

Experimente mit kalten Atomen zeigen erstmals direkt die Anderson-Lokalisierung von Materiewellen.

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See detaillocalized modulation of testosterone action: Function of steroid receptor coactivators in the brain
Charlier, Thierry ULg; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Ardis, L. I. (Ed.) New research on testosterone (2008)

Testosterone, through its activation of androgen and estrogen receptors, has been shown to play a critical role in brain development and physiology. Recent studies have shown that the activity of these ... [more ▼]

Testosterone, through its activation of androgen and estrogen receptors, has been shown to play a critical role in brain development and physiology. Recent studies have shown that the activity of these receptors can be modulated by the interaction with several proteins and, in particular, that coactivators are required to enhance their transcriptional activity. The steroid receptor coactivator-1, SRC-1 is the best-characterized coactivator and we review here the current knowledge on the distribution, regulation of expression and function of this protein in the brain, focusing mostly on our work in Japanese quail. As expected for a ubiquitous coactivator, SRC-1 is present throughout the brain in both mammalian and avian species but is found in particularly high concentrations in testosterone-sensitive areas such as the preoptic area in rat and Japanese quail and in the song control nuclei in songbirds. Further analysis demonstrates that the expression of SRC-1 is not constitutive but regulated in specific brain areas by the sex, acute stress and testosterone treatment. In addition, the protein concentration appears to fluctuate through the day in some brain regions. These modulations of SRC-1 expression by endogenous (sex) and exogenous (stress) factors could potentially exacerbate at specific times the competition or squelching between different nuclear receptors and therefore decrease the biological response induced by one or another hormonal system. Although the existence of such a phenomenon has not yet been demonstrated in a functionally intact biological system, the effects of SRC-1 antisense treatments clearly strengthen this hypothesis. Indeed, the decrease of SRC-1 expression in the hypothalamus induced by antisense oligonucleotide injections clearly inhibited both estrogen-dependent male sexual behavior and androgen-dependent pre- and post-copulatory displays (strut) in Japanese quail, therefore demonstrating a role of the coactivator in the transcriptional activation induced by both estrogen and androgen receptors. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect on sexual behavior of SRC-1 knock down was not systematically associated with modifications of several histological (definition of median preoptic nucleus [POM] using Nissl staining), immunohistochemical (aromatase and vasotocin cells and fibers in the POM) and biochemical (aromatase enzymatic activity) markers of testosterone action in the brain. This dissociation of the effects of SRC-1 on behavior on the one hand and on aromatase and POM neurochemistry on another hand suggests that other system(s) involved in the activation of male sexual behavior are likely more sensitive to a decrease of SRC-1 expression. In future research, it will be essential to determine the other cofactors involved in specific physiological responses and to define whether these coactivators act synergistically, in parallel or independently in the modulation of the activity of one or several nuclear receptors linked to a particular physiological event. In several biological models, the observed changes in concentration of the circulating hormone and /or its receptors are apparently not sufficient to explain the physiological and behavioral responses observed after testosterone treatment. The discovery of steroid receptor coactivators opens new perspectives in the study of the molecular basis of steroid action at the level of the organism and a complete understanding of the mechanisms of steroid action will not be achieved without a detailed characterization of nuclear receptor cofactors. [less ▲]

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See detailIm Zeichen des Ödipuskomplexes. Mutterbindung und Vaterhass in Günter Grass’ Autobiographie „Beim Häuten der Zwiebel“ und seinem Roman „Die Blechtrommel“.
Pontzen, Alexandra ULg

in Hagestedt, Lutz (Ed.) Literatur als Lust. Begegnungen zwischen Poesie und Wissenschaft: Festschrift für Thomas Anz zum 60. Geburtstag (2008)

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See detailAssessment of existing formulas for equivalent damping to use in direct displacement-based design
Degée, Hervé ULg; Bento, R.; Massena, B.

in Proceedings of the 14th World Conference on Erthquake Engineering (2008)

It is generally stated that an accurate evaluation of the equivalent viscous damping is a crucial step in the DirectDisplacement-Based Design (DDBD) methodology. A wrong assessment of equivalent viscous ... [more ▼]

It is generally stated that an accurate evaluation of the equivalent viscous damping is a crucial step in the DirectDisplacement-Based Design (DDBD) methodology. A wrong assessment of equivalent viscous dampingcan indeed lead to important errors on the actual ductility demand of the structural elements. The objective of thepresent contribution is to assess and compare different existing formulas for the evaluation of the equivalent damping and to provide information on the impact of choosing one or another formulation on the seismicdesign. It is more precisely focused on the very recent proposals of Dwairi – Kowalsky and Blandon –Priestley. [less ▲]

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See detailPeinlichkeit und Imagination
Pontzen, Alexandra ULg

in Ziemer, Gesa; Zumsteg, Simon; Huber, Jörg (Eds.) Archipele des Imaginären (2008)

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See detailTunisian Table Olive Phenolic Compounds And Their Antioxidant Capacity
Ben Othman, N.; Weber, Dominique ULg; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

in Journal of Food Science (2008), 73(4),

For the 1st time, 4 olive cultivars, theMeski, Chemlali, Besbessi, and Tounsi, fromthe Tunisian market were investigated to evaluate the phenolic compounds’ contribution in nutritional value of table ... [more ▼]

For the 1st time, 4 olive cultivars, theMeski, Chemlali, Besbessi, and Tounsi, fromthe Tunisian market were investigated to evaluate the phenolic compounds’ contribution in nutritional value of table olives. From the Meski cultivar, we have chosen 4 different samples to evaluate differences within the same cultivar. Basic characteristics and total phenolic content were evaluated in flesh and kernel. The highest value of flesh phenolic content was observed in sample M4 of the Meski cultivar; however, the lowest value was observed in the Besbessi cultivar and they were 1801 and 339 mg GA/100 g dry weight, respectively. Themain simple phenolic compounds identified in flesh extracts are hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol, and vanillic acid. Oleuropein was not detected in any samples. The antioxidant activity of Tunisian olive flesh varies between 212 and 462 μM TEAC/g of dry weight. Antioxidant activity of olives was related to their phenolic content but we found a low correlation between phenolic content and TEAC [less ▲]

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