References of "2007"
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See detailLe tribunal d'application des peines et la mise en liberté provisoire en vue de l'éloignement du territoire
Monville, Pierre ULg

in X (Ed.) Le nouveau droit des peines : statuts juridiques des condamnés et tribunaux de l'application des peines (2007)

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See detailLong-term outcomes in dogs with sinonasal aspergillosis treated with intranasal infusions of enilconazole
Schuller, S.; Clercx, Cécile ULg

in Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association (2007), 43(1, Jan-Feb), 33-38

Long-term outcomes ( mean 38 +/- 17 months) were evaluated in 27 dogs with sinonasal aspergillosis after successful medical treatment using intranasal infusions of 1% or 2% enilconazole ( 1%, n= 15; 2%, n ... [more ▼]

Long-term outcomes ( mean 38 +/- 17 months) were evaluated in 27 dogs with sinonasal aspergillosis after successful medical treatment using intranasal infusions of 1% or 2% enilconazole ( 1%, n= 15; 2%, n= 12). Long-term outcomes with both treatment protocols were good, with half of the dogs being asymptomatic throughout the follow-up period. The remaining dogs showed mild clinical signs compatible with chronic rhinitis/sinusitis. These clinical signs were interpreted as chronic lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis/sinusitis and episodes of bacterial rather than fungal infection. Three dogs had confirmed reinfection or relapse 2 to 36 months after clinical resolution. [less ▲]

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See detailFunktionswörter
Möller, Robert ULg

in Hufeisen, Britta; Marx, Nicole (Eds.) EuroComGerm - Die sieben Siebe: Germanische Sprachen lesen lernen (2007)

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See detailA therapeutic strategy for treatment of the bovine respiratory disease complex: The rationale for the combination of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with an antibiotic
Lekeux, Pierre ULg

in Cattle Practice (2007), 15(Part 2), 115-119

The bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) can be caused by a number of factors involving the animal, its environment, and the presence of infectious agents. The syndrome can be classified into four ... [more ▼]

The bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) can be caused by a number of factors involving the animal, its environment, and the presence of infectious agents. The syndrome can be classified into four grades: Grade 1, subclinical disease; Grade 2, compensated clinical disease; Grade 3, noncompensated clinical disease; and Grade 4, irreversible clinical disease, which threatens the animal's survival. The predisposition of cattle, especially beef calves, to respiratory problems is related to their lack of functional pulmonary hardiness. Selection of breeds that demonstrate adequate pulmonary function and sufficient ventilatory reserve may help in the control of BRDC, but this approach is difficult to implement and slow to produce results. Prophylactic measures, including vaccination programmes and modifying management practices to reduce stress, also have a place in prevention of BRDC. A therapeutic strategy to minimise the economic impact of BRDC includes the use of appropriate antibacterial therapy, modulation of the pulmonary inflammatory reaction, and correction of mechanical disorders. Most cattle affected by BRDC are classified as Grade 3. In these cases, irreversible damage to the lung can only be avoided by simultaneous control of bacterial infection and local inflammation. The basic therapeutic strategy described in this article involves the combination of an antibiotic, such as florfenicol, to act against the relevant pathogens and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), such as flunixin, to act against the deleterious effects of inflammation [less ▲]

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See detailProsody and foreign language learning
Rasier, Laurent ULg

Conference (2007)

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See detailEvolution des eucaryotes au précambrien
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

Conference (2007)

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See detailA checklist of the bryophytes of Corsica (France): new records and a review of the literature
Sotiaux, André ULg; Pioli, A.; Royaud, A. et al

in Journal of Bryology (2007), 29(Part 1), 41-53

Based on a thorough review of the literature as well as floristic surveys undertaken over 20 years, a checklist of the bryophytes of Corsica, a mountainous western Mediterranean island, is presented. The ... [more ▼]

Based on a thorough review of the literature as well as floristic surveys undertaken over 20 years, a checklist of the bryophytes of Corsica, a mountainous western Mediterranean island, is presented. The occurrence of 17 liverwort and 44 moss species is documented for the first time from Corsica. As a result, the Corsican bryoflora includes 540 species: 148 liverworts, three hornworts and 389 mosses. Among the species reported, seven liverwort and 17 moss species are red-listed in Europe. By contrast with angiosperms, no bryophyte is endemic to the island based on traditional, phenetic species concepts. The number of new species reported here indicates that Corsica is exceedingly under-recorded bryologically. A better knowledge of the distribution, frequency and ecology of bryophyte species on the island is thus an absolute prerequisite in order to propose appropriate conservation measures in this Mediterranean environment that is, at least locally, severely threatened. [less ▲]

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See detailLa veracidad de la literatura
Ceballos Viro, Alvaro ULg

in López Arnal, Salvador; Vázquez Álvarez, Iñaki (Eds.) El legado de un maestro (2007)

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See detailStructural basis for the actin-binding function of missing-in-metastasis.
Lee, Sung Haeng; Kerff, Frédéric ULg; Chereau, David et al

in Structure (2007), 15(2), 145-55

The adaptor protein missing-in-metastasis (MIM) contains independent F- and G-actin binding domains, consisting, respectively, of an N-terminal 250 aa IRSp53/MIM homology domain (IMD) and a C-terminal ... [more ▼]

The adaptor protein missing-in-metastasis (MIM) contains independent F- and G-actin binding domains, consisting, respectively, of an N-terminal 250 aa IRSp53/MIM homology domain (IMD) and a C-terminal WASP-homology domain 2 (WH2). We determined the crystal structures of MIM's IMD and that of its WH2 bound to actin. The IMD forms a dimer, with each subunit folded as an antiparallel three-helix bundle. This fold is related to that of the BAR domain. Like the BAR domain, the IMD has been implicated in membrane binding. Yet, comparison of the structures reveals that the membrane binding surfaces of the two domains have opposite curvatures, which may determine the type of curvature of the interacting membrane. The WH2 of MIM is longer than the prototypical WH2, interacting with all four subdomains of actin. We characterize a similar WH2 at the C terminus of IRSp53 and propose that in these two proteins WH2 performs a scaffolding function. [less ▲]

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See detailConventional Versus Alternative Pig Production Assessed By Multicriteria Decision Analysis
Degre, Aurore ULg; Debouche, Charles ULg; Verheve, Didier

in Agronomy for Sustainable Development (2007), 27(3),

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See detailMorphology of the stifle menisci in dogs: preliminary study
De Busscher, Virginie; Letesson, Julien; Busoni, Valeria ULg et al

in Slovenian Veterinary Research (2007), 44

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See detailQuestions de droit social
Clesse, Jacques ULg; Kefer, Fabienne ULg

Book published by Anthémis (2007)

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See detailMourir au Pays des deux Fleuves. L'au-delà mésopotamien d'après les sources sumériennes et akkadiennes
Van der Stede, Véronique ULg

Book published by Peeters (2007)

 Cet ouvrage aborde la question des croyances mésopotamiennes en matière d’au-delà. Comment les Mésopotamiens concevaient-ils la mort ? Sous quelle forme les défunts survivaient-ils ? Comment les ... [more ▼]

 Cet ouvrage aborde la question des croyances mésopotamiennes en matière d’au-delà. Comment les Mésopotamiens concevaient-ils la mort ? Sous quelle forme les défunts survivaient-ils ? Comment les Mésopotamiens percevaient-ils le monde des morts? Qui étaient les divinités des Enfers ? Quelles étaient les conditions de survie des trépassés ? Telles sont entre autres les questions qui sont envisagées dans ce livre à travers l’analyse de sources textuelles en langues akkadienne et sumérienne. [less ▲]

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See detailPolyphase karst system in Cretaceous chalk and calcarenite of the Belgian-Dutch border
Willems, Luc ULg; Rodet, Joël; Fournier, Matthieu et al

in Zeitschrift für Geomorphologie (2007), 51(3), 361-376

Along the Belgian-Dutch border, underground and surface quarries dug in Cretaceous calcarenite and chalk intersect many karst features as well as deep large nodes of weathered rock. Their observation ... [more ▼]

Along the Belgian-Dutch border, underground and surface quarries dug in Cretaceous calcarenite and chalk intersect many karst features as well as deep large nodes of weathered rock. Their observation allows the reconstruction of the genesis of an original karst system resulting from the merging of initially independent endokarsts and exokarsts. Deep weathering has developed within the Cretaceous formations, creating nodes of weathered chalk and closed cavities. These phenomena are expanded over time and can form interconnected voids. Near the surface, solution pipes are generated under the coarsest deposits of a fluvial terrace capping the Cretaceous formations. These pipes develop vertically and may be related to the progressive lowering of the water table in connection with the incision of the Meuse valley. Some of these phenomena cut up the older endokarsts and organize complex systems of out-flow within the chalk. [less ▲]

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See detailComorbidity and disease status based risk stratification of outcomes among patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplasia receiving allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Sorror, Mohamed L; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E et al

in Journal of Clinical Oncology (2007), 25(27), 4246-54

PURPOSE: Retrospective studies have shown similar survival among patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplasia (MDS) after nonmyeloablative compared with myeloablative conditioning ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: Retrospective studies have shown similar survival among patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplasia (MDS) after nonmyeloablative compared with myeloablative conditioning. Refined risk stratification is required to design prospective trials. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We stratified outcomes among patients with AML (n = 391) or MDS (n = 186) who received either nonmyeloablative (n = 125) or myeloablative (n = 452) allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) based on comorbidities, as assessed by a HCT-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI), as well as disease status. Patients receiving nonmyeloablative conditioning were older, more frequently pretreated, more often received unrelated grafts, and more often had HCT-CI scores of 3 compared with patients who received myeloablative conditioning. RESULTS: Patients with HCT-CI scores of 0 to 2 and either low or high disease risks had probabilities of overall survival at 2 years of 70% and 57% after nonmyeloablative conditioning compared with 78% and 50% after myeloablative conditioning, respectively. Patients with HCT-CI scores of 3 and either low or high disease risks had probabilities of overall survival of 41% and 29% with nonmyeloablative conditioning compared with 45% and 24% with myeloablative regimens, respectively. After adjusting for pretransplantation differences, stratified outcomes were not significantly different among patients receiving nonmyeloablative compared with myeloablative conditioning, with the exception of lessened nonrelapse mortality (hazard ratio, 0.50; P = .05) in the highest risk group. CONCLUSION: Patients with low comorbidity scores could be candidates for prospective randomized trials comparing nonmyeloablative and myeloablative conditioning regardless of disease status. Additional data are required for patients with low-risk diseases and high comorbidity scores. Novel antitumor agents combined with nonmyeloablative HCT should be explored among patients with high comorbidity scores and advanced disease. [less ▲]

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See detailProgramme IC&C - Interface Créative & Conception
Leclercq, Pierre ULg; Juchmes, Roland ULg; Azar, Sleiman et al

Software (2007)

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