References of "2006"
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See detailImproving control of storage diseases on apple by combining biological and physical postharvest methods
Creemers, P.; Van Laer, S.; Vorstermans, B. et al

Poster (2006)

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See detailBiogeographic trends in Antarctic lake communities
Gibson, John; Wilmotte, Annick ULg; Taton, Arnaud et al

in Bergstrom, Dana; Convey, Peter; Huiskes, Ad HL (Eds.) Trends in Antarctic terrestrial and limnetic ecosystems (2006)

The basic biogeographic zones proposed many years ago – the Subantarctic islands, Maritime Antarctica and Continental Antarctica – continue to hold up, though they cannot be seen as absolute dividers of ... [more ▼]

The basic biogeographic zones proposed many years ago – the Subantarctic islands, Maritime Antarctica and Continental Antarctica – continue to hold up, though they cannot be seen as absolute dividers of biodiversity. For example, subantarctic Macquarie Island appears to be biogeographically separate from the islands of the Kerguelen Province, and on the continent there are species that are present in lakes of more than one zone. Furthermore, there are numerous lake environments that have yet to be investigated, and it is probable that some of these lakes could turn up surprises that will bring into question these basic divisions. An important question to be answered is whether these biogeographic zones reflect climate attributes, or whether they were moulded long ago by barriers to dispersal. Again, our imperfect knowledge of Antarctic lacustrine biogeography means that this question cannot at present be answered. However, as discussed elsewhere in this volume (Chown and Convey), there are indications of a strong biogeographical boundary for terrestrial species between the Maritime and Continental Antarctic zones. A palaeolimnological approach will assist in answering this question: understanding how Antarctic biogeography has developed through time will provide necessary insights into current distributions. A prime example is the occurrence of the copepod Boeckella poppei in Beaver Lake. Pugh et al. (2002) initially concluded that this species was an anthropogenic introduction, then Bayly et al. (2003) provided morphological evidence for long habitation in the area of Beaver Lake. Recent palaeolimnological work has shown that the species has been present in nearby Lake Terrasovoje for at least 9000 yrs (L. Cromer, A. Bissett, J. Gibson and K. Swadling, unpublished data). Even though this lake has only existed in the Holocene, cosmogenic exposure dates in the same area of exposed rock can exceed 106 years (D. Gore and D. White, personal communication). From these observations it can be concluded that Boeckella poppei has been associated with the Beaver Lake area for at least the entire Holocene and probably well back into the Pleistocene, and that its occurrence outside its ‘preferred’ biogeographical zone (Maritime Antarctica) is not a reflection of current climate, rather of history. The majority of our knowledge regarding Antarctic lacustrine biodiversity and biogeography has come from classic taxonomic studies, where the morphology (or biochemistry for bacteria) has been of greatest importance. In many cases this has led to questionable identification, correct identification of species is paramount if the true biodiversity and biogeography of Antarctica is to be deduced. It is only in the last few years that the more objective approach of molecular genetics has been applied to Antarctic lacustrine organisms, and then only for more cryptic groups, such as bacteria and cyanobacteria. As more samples and organisms are studied by these methods it is likely that new relationships between species distributions will be found. Due to the limited number of species in Antarctica (compared to more temperate zones), it may be possible in the future to record the make-up of selected genes of most, if not all, of the biota, which will allow more precise analysis. There is increasing evidence for endemism amongst the inhabitants of lakes both on the Antarctic continent and the subantarctic islands, from bacteria to crustacea. Use of molecular genetic techniques to identify more cryptic species will most likely add to the list of putative endemics. It is clear, however, that recent colonisation and current climate also play important roles in the distribution of the biota, as most of the lakes in Antarctica are of relatively recent (Holocene) origin. Colonising species have to be adapted to transport from source areas, which can either involve inter- or intra-continental movement, as well as survival on arrival at potential habitat. Flexibility in nutritional and habitat requirements is an important factor in determining whether a species will be a successful coloniser. The buffering to environmental extremes provided by the liquid water habitat means that conditions further south will not be as harsh as those experienced by their terrestrial counterparts. As the climate changes in the future, it will be interesting to note the effects of these changes on the lacustrine biota. Will new species colonise the Antarctic Peninsula where temperatures are warming? In the longer term, the biogeography of Antarctic lakes will continue to be dynamic. New species will arrive, others will become extinct. The biogeographic zones long-proposed may continue to hold, though more precise knowledge of current distributions and responses to climate change may refine our view. [less ▲]

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See detailLe fonctionnement de la mémoire épisodique dans la maladie d'Alzheimer
Adam, Stéphane ULg

in Belin, Catherine; Ergis, Anne-Marie; Moreau, Olivier (Eds.) Actualités sur les démences: Aspects cliniques et neuropsychologiques (2006)

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See detailRelationship between haptoglobin, serum amyloid A, and clinical status in a survey of dairy herds during a 6-month period
Humblet, Marie-France ULg; Guyot, Hugues ULg; Boudry, Benjamin et al

in Veterinary Clinical Pathology (2006), 35(2), 188-193

Haptoglobin and serum amyloid A are major acute phase proteins in cattle. Dairy cattle often develop pathologic conditions in the peripartum period; acute phase proteins may be useful in their diagnosis ... [more ▼]

Haptoglobin and serum amyloid A are major acute phase proteins in cattle. Dairy cattle often develop pathologic conditions in the peripartum period; acute phase proteins may be useful in their diagnosis. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of serum haptoglobin (Hp) and serum amyloid A (SAA) concentrations with clinical health status for diagnosing disease during the peripartum period in dairy cattle. Methods: Dairy cows from 4 herds were evaluated every 15 days over a 6-month period. Health status was determined by thorough clinical examination. Haptoglobin and SAA concentrations were measured in serum using validated methods and the results were classifed as positive or negative based on defined cutoff points. Disease prevalence, sensitivity, and specificity were compared using clinical examination as the gold standard. Results: A total of 1896 samples from 158 cows were analyzed. Significant increases in mean Hp and SAA concentrations were observed in the week following parturition in both primiparous and multiparous cows, although high interindividual variability was observed. Both Hp and SAA had low sensitivity but higher specificity in determining disease status compared with clinical examination. Increased concentrations of Hp and SAAwere found in ,10% of samples from clinically healthy cows, except in the week after parturition. Conclusions: Haptoglobin and serum amyloid A should be used with caution as markers of inflammation in the week after calving. Poor sensitivity in other postpartum periods could be related to the higher incidence of chronic (vs acute) inflammation. Haptoglobin may be appropriate for routine screening, but further work needs to be done to assess its value as an indicator of herd health. [less ▲]

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See detailA Text Mining-based Recommendation System for Customer Decision Making in Online Product Customization
Ittoo, Ashwin ULg; Zhang, Yi Yang; Jiao, Roger

in IEEE Proceedigns of International Conference on Management of Innovation and Technology (2006)

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See detailFood safety surveillance through a risk based control programme: Approach employed by the Belgian Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain
Maudoux, J. P.; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Rettigner, C. et al

in Veterinary Quarterly (2006), 28(4), 140-154

The principal responsibility of the Belgian Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain (FASFC) is to guarantee the safety along the food chain. In order to accomplish this responsibility, the FASFC ... [more ▼]

The principal responsibility of the Belgian Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain (FASFC) is to guarantee the safety along the food chain. In order to accomplish this responsibility, the FASFC has developed an integrated official control program to check compliance with various regulations. The original methodology developed and applied by FASFC is presented. This methodology is based on risk evaluation, statistical tools and current scientific knowledge. [less ▲]

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See detailPrediction of deformation textures in zirconium based on a simplified modelling of grain interaction
Lelotte, Thomas; Delannay, L.; Habraken, Anne ULg

in Khan, A. S. (Ed.) Proceedings of the Plasticity Conference 2006 (2006)

The goal of this study is to apply a “multisite” crystal plasticity model to the prediction of texture evolution in zirconium deformed at high temperature. The model under consideration is an extension of ... [more ▼]

The goal of this study is to apply a “multisite” crystal plasticity model to the prediction of texture evolution in zirconium deformed at high temperature. The model under consideration is an extension of the elastic-viscoplastic “multisite model” proposed by Delannay et al. [2005] which has been adapted to account for a new type of grain interaction (Van Houtte et al. [2005]). Predictions of the model are compared to experimental data. Two forming processes are considered: sheet rolling (Lebensohn et al. [1994]) and the torsion of a cylindrical bar (Sanchez et al. [2001]). [less ▲]

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See detailBone Formation around Immediately Loaded Implants: a Bone Chamber Model
Vandamme, K.; Naert, Ignace; Geris, Liesbet ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 84th General Session & Exhibition of the IADR (2006)

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See detailPour saluer Hubert Nyssen
Durand, Pascal ULg

in Durand, Pascal (Ed.) L'écrivain et son double. Hubert Nyssen (2006)

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See detailSkin immunoglobulin deposition following intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in toxic epidermal necrolysis.
Paquet, Philippe ULg; Kaveri, S.; Jacob, E. et al

in Experimental Dermatology (2006), 15(5), 381-6

Human intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) which contain anti-CD95 antibodies have been proposed to treat toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Presently, there is no evidence that IVIg reach the keratinocytes ... [more ▼]

Human intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) which contain anti-CD95 antibodies have been proposed to treat toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Presently, there is no evidence that IVIg reach the keratinocytes in TEN patients. The aim of this study was to assess the Ig distribution in the serum, blister fluid and skin of six consecutive TEN patients treated with IVIg (1 g/kg/day) for 3 days. They were compared with five TEN patients who only received supportive therapy. In all patients, IgA, IgM and IgG concentrations were measured in the serum and blister fluid using an immuno-nephelometric method. Immunohistochemistry was performed on skin biopsies taken from both TEN clinically involved and uninvolved skin to search for IgG deposits. On admission, the IgG concentrations were significantly higher in both TEN serum and TEN blister fluid compared with their respective IgA and IgM contents. The IgG, IgA and IgM concentrations in blister fluid were significantly lower than their respective serum concentrations. The serum and blister fluid IgG concentrations, but not that of IgA and IgM, were markedly increased at the completion of the IVIg treatment. By contrast, they remained unchanged in the TEN patients that were untreated with IVIg. In the IVIg-treated patients, the IgG intraepidermal deposits raised markedly in both TEN-involved and uninvolved skin. This was not the case in patients who did not receive IVIg. These results suggest that IVIg perfusions brought a prominent increase in IgG concentration in the serum, blister fluid and epidermis of both TEN-involved and clinically uninvolved skin. The presence of potentially protective IgG in TEN epidermis following IVIg treatment could help limiting the disease progression. [less ▲]

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See detailN1,N2,N3-trisisopentenyl guanidine and N1,N2-diisopentenyl guanidine, two cytotoxic alkaloids from Alchornea cordifolia (Schumach.& Thonn.) Mull. Arg. (Euphorbiaceae) root barks.
Mavar-Manga, H.; Chapon, David; Hoet, Sara et al

in Natural Product Communications [=NPC] (2006), 1(12), 1097-1100

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See detailC2C and Coll2-1 biomarkers reveal increased type II collagen catabolism in biglycan/fibromodulin double deficient mice
Ameye, LG; DEBERG, Michelle ULg; Oliviera, M et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2006), 14(Suppl B), 61

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See detailColl2-1, Coll2-1 NO2 and myeloperoxydase in OA patients before and after hip or knee replacement
Deberg, M; Labasse, A; Quettier, E et al

in Osteoporosis International (2006)

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See detailSkin climacteric aging and hormone replacement therapy.
Quatresooz, Pascale ULg; Pierard, Claudine ULg; Gaspard, Ulysse ULg et al

in Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology (2006), 5(1), 3-8

A gender perspective is indispensable for a full understanding of aging. Menopause is a turning point in women's lives. In addition to the effects of chronological aging, sunlight exposure, and other ... [more ▼]

A gender perspective is indispensable for a full understanding of aging. Menopause is a turning point in women's lives. In addition to the effects of chronological aging, sunlight exposure, and other environmental and endogenous stimuli, the climacteric appears to exert some dramatic consequences on skin biology and aspect. The epidermis may become xerotic and exhibit altered functions. The dermis thins out and its elasticity decreases in concert with the decline in bone mass. The skin microcirculation is impaired. These aspects are some of the better worked-out changes of the climacteric, which in turn seem to be stabilized or in part reversible with hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The HRT effect on menopause consequences on hair growth and sebum production is less impressive. This review summarizes some important impacts of the climacteric on skin, and highlights the benefits of HRT that may influence cosmetic dermatology. [less ▲]

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See detailLe tranchant des modernes (suite)
Delville, Michel ULg

in Belloi, Livio; Delville, Michel (Eds.) L'oeuvre en morceaux (2006)

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