References of "2006"
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See detailMise en place d’un plan de prévention du stress à l’aide du WOCCQ : témoignage d’une bonne pratique
Peters, Stéphanie ULg; Papin, Jacqueline

Conference given outside the academic context (2006)

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See detailHow should functional imaging of patients with disorders of consciousness contribute to their clinical rehabilitation needs?
Laureys, Steven ULg; Giacino, J. T.; Schiff, N. D. et al

in Current Opinion in Neurology (2006), 19(6), 520-527

Purpose of review We discuss the problems of evidence-based neurorehabilitation in disorders of consciousness, and recent functional neuroimaging data obtained in the vegetative state and minimally ... [more ▼]

Purpose of review We discuss the problems of evidence-based neurorehabilitation in disorders of consciousness, and recent functional neuroimaging data obtained in the vegetative state and minimally conscious state. Recent findings Published data are insufficient to make recommendations for or against any of the neurorehabilitative treatments in vegetative state and minimally conscious state patients. Electrophysiological and functional imaging studies have been shown to be useful in measuring residual brain function in noncommunicative brain-damaged patients. Despite the fact that such studies could in principle allow an objective quantification of the putative cerebral effect of rehabilitative treatment in the vegetative state and minimally conscious state, they have so far not been used in this context. Summary Without controlled studies and careful patient selection criteria it will not be possible to evaluate the potential of therapeutic interventions in disorders of consciousness. There also is a need to elucidate the neurophysiological effects of such treatments. Integration of multimodal neuroimaging techniques should eventually improve our ability to disentangle differences in outcome on the basis of underlying mechanisms and better guide our therapeutic options in the challenging patient populations encountered following severe acute brain damage. [less ▲]

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See detailGuide de diagnostic des cas de souffrance relationnelle au travail
Delvaux, Sophie; Faulx, Daniel ULg; Italiano, Patrick ULg et al

Report (2006)

Le rapport est le résultat d'une recherche visant à organiser les connaissances en matière de violences relationnelles au travail de telle sorte que l'intervenant puisse pas à pas affiner sa perception de ... [more ▼]

Le rapport est le résultat d'une recherche visant à organiser les connaissances en matière de violences relationnelles au travail de telle sorte que l'intervenant puisse pas à pas affiner sa perception de la situation qui lui est soumise, en distinguant les différentes formes que peuvent prendre les violences relationnelles. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of timing of surgery on survival after preoperative hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC): Is it a matter of days?
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Notter, Markus; Matter, Maurice et al

in Acta Oncologica (2006), 45(8), 1086-1093

We intend to analyse retrospectively whether the time interval ("gap duration" = GD) between preoperative radiotherapy and surgery in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) has an impact on overall ... [more ▼]

We intend to analyse retrospectively whether the time interval ("gap duration" = GD) between preoperative radiotherapy and surgery in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) has an impact on overall survival (OS), cancer specific survival (CSS), disease free survival (DFS) and local control (LC). Two hundred seventy nine patients with LARC were entered in Trial 93-01 (hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy 41.6 Gy/26 Fx BID) shortly followed by surgery. From these 250 patients are fully assessable. The median GD of 5 days was used as a discriminator. The median follow-up for all patients was 39 months. GD > 5 days was a significant discriminator for actuarial 5-years OS (69% vs 47%, p = 0.002), CSS (82% vs 57%, p = 0.0007), DFS (62% vs 41%, p = 0.0003) but not for LC (93% vs 90%, p = non-significant). In multivariate analysis, the following factors independently predict outcome; for OS: age, GD, circumferential margin (CM) and nodal stage (ypN); for CSS: GD, ypN and vascular invasion (VI); for DFS: CEA, distance to anal verge, GD, ypN and VI; for LC: CM only. Gap duration predicts survival outcome but not local control. The patients submitted to surgery after a median delay of more than 5 days had a significantly better outcome. [less ▲]

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See detailLe roman pour adolescents aujourd'hui: écriture, thématique et réception
Delbrassine, Daniel ULg

Book published by SCEREN-CRDP Académie de Créteil - La joie par les livres (2006)

Qu'est-ce que le roman adressé à la jeunesse ? Quelles sont ses spécificités sur les plans linguistique, stylistique et thématique ? Fondé sur deux études comparatives et l'approche d'un corpus ... [more ▼]

Qu'est-ce que le roman adressé à la jeunesse ? Quelles sont ses spécificités sur les plans linguistique, stylistique et thématique ? Fondé sur deux études comparatives et l'approche d'un corpus contemporain, cet ouvrage trace les contours d'un phénomène littéraire assez récent. [less ▲]

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See detailMapping of the bovine growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) and polymorphism study in cattle
Colinet, Frédéric ULg; Eggen, André; Gengler, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2006, December)

A third control pathway of the Growth Hormone (GH) secretion has come into picture since the development of synthetic compounds known as Growth Hormone Secretagogues (GHSs). The GHS Receptor (GHS-R) and ... [more ▼]

A third control pathway of the Growth Hormone (GH) secretion has come into picture since the development of synthetic compounds known as Growth Hormone Secretagogues (GHSs). The GHS Receptor (GHS-R) and its subtype are abundantly located in the hypothalamus-pituitary unit, but are also distributed in other central areas and peripheral tissues. The GHS-R belongs to the G-protein coupled receptor family with seven transmembrane domain architecture. In order to determine the GHS-R gene sequence, total mRNA was extracted from abomasum and two types of GHS-R cDNA were identified. These two types are transcript variants (1a and 1b) of the same GHS-R gene. The gene encompasses two exons and a single intron. Using a 3000 Rad hybrid panel, the GHS-R gene was mapped to Bos taurus autosome 1 (BTA 1). This localization on BTA 1 agrees totally with comparative data between cattle and human since BTA 1 corresponds to part of human chromosome 3 where human GHSR is also mapped. By two-point analysis, most significantly linked marker are BL26 and BMS4031 (both LOD score : 5,66). Some studies detected different QTLs near these markers like for growth rate, carcass yield, milk portein and milk yield. In the cattle industry, it is of economical importance to increase plasma GH secretion because it is associated with faster growth, less fat stores and improved milk production. Being of economical importance and the detected QTLs near the GHS-R gene, it would be interesting to study the polymorphism on the bovine GHS-R gene. Screening for polymorphisms in the two exons on ten Belgian Blue bulls, ten Holsteins bulls and ten Limousin bulls revealed a total of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): three SNPs are in the first exon and one SNP in the second exon. In order to evaluate if GHS-R could be involved in genetic variation for growth rate, carcass yield, milk portein and milk yield, an association study between SNPs on GHS-R gene and these traits could be performed in a major cattle population. [less ▲]

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See detailNeQuick: In-Depth Analysis and New Developments
Bidaine, Benoît ULg; Prieto-Cerdeira, Roberto; Orus, Raul

in 3rd ESA Workshop on Satellite Navigation User Equipment Technologies NAVITEC '2006 (2006, December)

An empirical model called NeQuick has been selected for the modelling and correction of the ionospheric delay contribution in GALILEO single frequency receivers. The current baseline version of NeQuick ... [more ▼]

An empirical model called NeQuick has been selected for the modelling and correction of the ionospheric delay contribution in GALILEO single frequency receivers. The current baseline version of NeQuick for GALILEO is the one available in the International Telecommunication Union – Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) since 2001. From that time, several improvements have been proposed leading to the need of a better understanding and comparison of these different versions and an analysis of the weaknesses. Better results have been obtained by means of simpler ionosonde and profile parameters calculations, different topside formulation and new data files. The interest of a newer version of NeQuick including the above-mentioned modifications is highlighted as its error behaviour towards latitude shows a better agreement with reality. Those modifications should be coupled to a less simplistic topside formulation involving several layers with appropriate transitions such as the proposal introduced in this paper. The need of a different treatment regarding the daily effective use of the model for GALILEO single frequency algorithm compared to a physical use (that uses monthly median underlying data) is addressed. For the analysis and comparison of the different variants of the model, a software tool with a Graphical User Interface was developed. Preliminary comparisons for the physical use between different versions and also between modelled and measured data are presented. Such comparisons should be extended in the future for the effective use of the model. Finally, the structure and analysis of the mentioned issues and the results of the different comparisons are shown. Also solutions or potential paths to investigate solutions are proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailChronic low back pain. Good clinical practice (GCP)
Nielens, H.; Van Zundert, J.; Mairiaux, Philippe ULg et al

Report (2006)

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See detailBlogs littéraires : par-delà le moi
Habrand, Tanguy ULg

Article for general public (2006)

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See detailAtmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Climate Over Phanerozoic Times
François, Louis ULg; Lefèbvre, Vincent; Goddéris, Yves et al

Conference (2006, December)

The atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio has fluctuated widely over the Phanerozoic, according to the estimates from available proxy records. Because atmospheric CO2 is a major greenhouse gas, these fluctuations ... [more ▼]

The atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio has fluctuated widely over the Phanerozoic, according to the estimates from available proxy records. Because atmospheric CO2 is a major greenhouse gas, these fluctuations should have led to significant climatic variations. The "classical" view is indeed that atmospheric CO2 has been the main driver of the Earth's climate history. On long-term time scales, the atmospheric CO2 level is the result of the balance between CO2 inputs from volcanoes or oxidation of old organic carbon (kerogen) in exposed rocks and outputs through silicate weathering or organic carbon deposition. Existing model reconstructions of the Phanerozoic history of atmospheric CO2 are based on such budgets. Recent data and model experiments currently challenge these models. First, the carbon cycle may be more complex than represented in the earliest models. In particular, silicate weathering depends on numerous factors, which are not obvious to model or are poorly known over the Phanerozoic. Mountain uplift is one such factor, which has been much debated in the last decade. Lithology is another example: basalts weather much more rapidly than other silicate rocks and the emplacement of large basaltic areas on the continents may trigger glaciations. Continental configuration is also more important than previously thought, as indicated by recent model experiments on super-continent fragmentation coupling geochemical and climate models. Problems of "classical" Phanerozoic CO2 models are also well illustrated by the fact that the most recent estimates of CO2 degassing show very little variation between the Cretaceous and the present, a period when large changes in CO2 have occurred, whereas degassing is the most important forcing of CO2 evolution in long-term carbon cycle models. Second, CO2 is not the only driver of climate evolution. This obvious fact has largely been forgotten in Phanerozoic studies. What the proxies tell us on paleo-atmospheric CO2 is not always in line with what we know about paleoclimatic records. For instance, the proxies suggest relatively high CO2 levels during the Late Ordovician glaciations. Similarly, the Late Jurassic now appears to be colder than earlier thought, while again proxies suggest high atmospheric CO2 at that time. The mid-Miocene climate warming, which occurs simultaneously with a drop in CO2, provides another example. This latter change in CO2 is unanimously reflected in all proxies and, so, this decoupling between CO2 and climate cannot arise from uncertainties on the reconstructed CO2 levels or from dating problems, as might be the case of the former two examples. Other climatic drivers than CO2 clearly need to be considered. In this respect, vegetation- climate feedbacks have been completely disregarded in long-term climatic studies. Cenozoic cooling is, however, accompanied by a progressive transition from closed forests to more widespread grasslands and deserts on the continental areas, a change which must have had major impacts on the surface albedo and the water cycle. [less ▲]

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See detailAnesthesia for emergency cesarean section: regional or general?
Brichant, Jean-François ULg

Conference (2006, November 30)

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See detailSynthesis and radioligand binding studies of methoxylated 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinium derivatives as ligands of the apamin-sensitive Ca2+- activated K+ channels
Graulich, Amaury ULg; Scuvée-Moreau, Jacqueline ULg; Alleva, Livia ULg et al

in Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2006), 49(24), 7208-7214

Several methoxylated 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoliniums derived from N-methyl-laudanosine and N-methyl-noscapine were synthesized and evaluated for their affinity for apamin-sensitive binding sites. The ... [more ▼]

Several methoxylated 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoliniums derived from N-methyl-laudanosine and N-methyl-noscapine were synthesized and evaluated for their affinity for apamin-sensitive binding sites. The quaternary ammonium derivatives have a higher affinity with regard to the tertiary amines. 6,7-Dimethoxy analogues possess a higher affinity than the 6,8- and 7,8- dimethoxy isomers. A 3,4-dimethoxybenzyl or a 2-naphthylmethyl moiety in C-1 position are more favorable than a 3,4-dimethoxyphenethyl group. Smaller groups such as propyl or isobutyl are unfavorable. In 6,7-dimethoxy analogues, increasing the size and lipophilicity with a naphthyl group in the C-1 position leads to a slight increase of affinity, while the same group in the 6,7,8- trimethoxy series is less favorable. The 6,7,8- trimethoxy derivative 3f is the first tertiary amine in the series to possess an affinity close to that of N-methyl-laudanosine and N-methyl-noscapine. Moreover, electrophysiological studies show that the most effective compound 4f blocks the apamin-sensitive afterhyperpolarization in rat dopaminergic neurons. [less ▲]

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See detailA global inventory of stratospheric fluorine in 2004 based on Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) measurements
Nassar, Ray; Bernath, Peter F.; Boone, Christopher D. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research (2006), 111

Total fluorine (FTOT) in the stratosphere has been determined using Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS) measurements of HF, COF2, COClF, CF4, CCl3F (CFC-11), CCl2F2 ... [more ▼]

Total fluorine (FTOT) in the stratosphere has been determined using Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS) measurements of HF, COF2, COClF, CF4, CCl3F (CFC-11), CCl2F2 (CFC-12), CHClF2 (HCFC-22), CCl2FCClF2 (CFC-113), CH3CClF2 (HCFC-142b), CH2FCF3 (HFC-134a), and SF6. The retrieval of HFC-134a (CH2FCF3) from spaceborne measurements had not been carried out prior to this work. Measurements of these species have been supplemented by data from models to extend the altitude range of the profiles and have also been complemented by estimates of 15 minor fluorine species. Using these data, separate fluorine budgets were determined in five latitude zones (60°–82°N, 30°–60°N, 30°S–30°N, 30°–60°S, and 60°–82°S) by averaging over the period of February 2004 to January 2005 inclusive, when possible. Stratospheric FTOT profiles in each latitude zone are nearly linear, with mean stratospheric FTOT values ranging from 2.50 to 2.59 ppbv (with a 1sig precision of 0.04–0.07 ppbv and an estimated accuracy of 0.15 ppbv) for each zone. The highest mean FTOT value occurred in the tropics, which is qualitatively consistent with increasing levels of stratospheric fluorine and the mean stratospheric circulation pattern. [less ▲]

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