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See detailDecalactone production by Yarrowia lipolytica under increased O2 transfer rates
Aguedo, Mario ULg; Gomes, N.; Garcia, E. E. et al

in Biotechnology Letters (2005), 27(20), 1617-1621

Yarrowia lipolytica converts methyl ricinoleate to γ-decalactone, a high-value fruity aroma compound. The highest amount of 3-hydroxy-γ- decalactone produced by the yeast (263 mg∈l-1) occurred by ... [more ▼]

Yarrowia lipolytica converts methyl ricinoleate to γ-decalactone, a high-value fruity aroma compound. The highest amount of 3-hydroxy-γ- decalactone produced by the yeast (263 mg∈l-1) occurred by increasing the k L a up to 120 h-1 at atmospheric pressure; above it, its concentration decreased, suggesting a predominance of the activity of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Cultures were grown under high-pressure, i.e., under increased O2 solubility, but, although growth was accelerated, γ-decalactone production decreased. However, by applying 0.5 MPa during growth and biotransformation gave increased concentrations of dec-2-en-4-olide and dec-3-en-4-olide (70 mg∈l -1). © Springer 2005. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of therapy for lymphoma.
Jerusalem, Guy ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Beguin, Yves ULg et al

in Seminars in Nuclear Medicine (2005), 35(3), 186-96

Positron emission tomography (PET) using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) is the best noninvasive imaging technique for to assess response in patients suffering from lymphoma. Early response ... [more ▼]

Positron emission tomography (PET) using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) is the best noninvasive imaging technique for to assess response in patients suffering from lymphoma. Early response evaluation ("interim PET") after one, a few cycles, or at midtreatment can predict response, progression-free survival, and overall survival. We calculated from data of 7 studies an overall sensitivity to predict treatment failure of 79%, a specificity of 92%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 90%, a negative predictive value (NPV) of 81%, and an accuracy of 85%. Although it is not yet indicated to change patient management based on residual (18)F-FDG uptake on interim scan in chemotherapy-sensitive patients, prospective studies evaluating the role of an interim PET in patient management clearly are warranted. (18)F-FDG PET also has an important prognostic role in relapsing patients after reinduction chemotherapy before high-dose chemotherapy (HCT) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). However, all chemotherapy-sensitive patients remain candidates for HCT followed by ASCT, even if (18)F-FDG PET showed residual (18)F-FDG uptake. We calculated from data of 3 studies an overestimated risk of relapse in 16% of all PET-positive patients. Some patients with residual (18)F-FDG uptake will have a good outcome after HCT followed by ASCT. (18)F-FDG PET is the imaging technique of choice for end-of-treatment evaluation. However, (18)F-FDG is not specific for tumoral tissue. Active inflammatory lesions and infectious processes can be falsely interpreted as malignant residual cells. However, a negative (18)F-FDG PET cannot exclude minimal residual disease. Consequently, it is always indicated to correlate PET findings with clinical data, other imaging modalities, and/or a biopsy. We calculated, from data of 17 studies in end-of-treatment evaluation, a sensitivity of 76%, a specificity of 94%, a PPV of 82%, a NPV 92%, and an accuracy of 89%. [less ▲]

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See detailPolyphased karst systems in sandstones and quartzites of Minas Gerais, Brazil
Willems, Luc ULg; Rodet, Joël; Pouclet, André et al

in Proceeding 14th UIS Congress, Athens-Kalamos, 23-28 august 2005, Abstract Book : 71. (2005)

The state of Minas Gerais (Brazil) exhibits several major karst areas located in sandstone and quartzite terrains, that display a complex suite of underground and surface karstic forms. In the Espinhaço ... [more ▼]

The state of Minas Gerais (Brazil) exhibits several major karst areas located in sandstone and quartzite terrains, that display a complex suite of underground and surface karstic forms. In the Espinhaço Ridge, central Minas Gerais, several caves, up to a few hundred metres long, occur in the surroundings of the town of Diamantina. Some of these caves, such as Salitre, represent swallow-holes and show dome pits. Other horizontal caves are characterized by corrosion forms generated into the phreatic zone. In some places, such as in the Rio Preto area, these phreatic forms have been overprinted by ceiling tubes, suggesting a polyphase karst evolution, prior to the draining of the cave. Relicts of passages, with circular cross section up to a metre in diametre, can be found amidst the residual tower-like surface landforms, which constitute a typical scenery in the landscape. Their dissection is due to a generalised karstification in the area, resulting in closed canyons, megakarrens and kamenitzas. In southern Minas Gerais, close to the Mantiqueira Ridge, the caves of the state park of Ibitipoca can extent 2 km in length. These caves are associated with a very large hanging geological syncline. Several of these caves contain active streams, that flow for hundreds of metres before disappearing in sand-choked passages. Keyhole cross sections characterize steeply descending passages in these caves, indicating a change from slow phreatic flow towards a faster vadose flow responsible for the vertical incision of the passage. Such change is probably related to base level lowering and/or to turn in the direction of the water flow. Several generations of wall-pockets, from a few centimetres to over a metre long, occur into the caves. These features are good indicators of the initial phase of speleogenesis, generating the initial conduits by their coalescence. This mechanism is also responsible for cut-off meanders. The main river in the area, which flows along the syncline axis, cuts through a rock barrier, generating a tunnel-like passage. This cave drains, through resurgences in its walls, part of the water that flows in other caves located in the flank of the syncline. The non-carbonate karst features observed in the state of Minas Gerais demonstrate the complex organisation of polyphase karst systems due to the linkage of underground and surface forms not previously connected. As in carbonate areas, these systems may play an important hydrological role. [less ▲]

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See detailInactivation of bacterial DD-peptidase by beta-sultams.
Llinas, Antonio; Ahmed, Naveed; Cordaro, Massimiliano et al

in Biochemistry (2005), 44(21), 7738-46

N-Acyl-beta-sultams are time-dependent, irreversible active site-directed inhibitors of Streptomyces R61 DD-peptidase. The rate of inactivation is first order with respect to beta-sultam concentration ... [more ▼]

N-Acyl-beta-sultams are time-dependent, irreversible active site-directed inhibitors of Streptomyces R61 DD-peptidase. The rate of inactivation is first order with respect to beta-sultam concentration, and the second-order rate constants show a dependence on pH similar to that for the hydrolysis of a substrate. Inactivation is due to the formation of a stable 1:1 enzyme-inhibitor complex as a result of the active site serine being sulfonylated by the beta-sultam as shown by ESI-MS analysis and by X-ray crystallography. A striking feature of the sulfonyl enzyme is that the inhibitor is not bound to the oxyanion hole but interacts extensively with the "roof" of the active site where the Arg 285 is located. [less ▲]

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See detailThyroid hormones in obese dogs submitted to a weight loss protocol
Jeusette, Isabelle; Daminet, Sylvie; Detilleux, Johann ULg et al

in Obesity Reviews : An Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity (2005), 6

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See detailAn overview of the epidemiology and genetics of acromegaly.
Daly, Adrian ULg; Petrossians, Patrick ULg; Beckers, Albert ULg

in Journal of Endocrinological Investigation (2005), 28(11 Suppl International), 67-69

Historical data indicate that pituitary tumors represent 10% of intracranial tumors, while adenomas are noted in approximately 14-23% of normal subjects on autopsy or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI ... [more ▼]

Historical data indicate that pituitary tumors represent 10% of intracranial tumors, while adenomas are noted in approximately 14-23% of normal subjects on autopsy or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). About 2.5% of these tumors stain positive for GH in histopathologic studies. In contrast, the prevalence of clinically diagnosed acromegaly is lower at 36-69 per million population. Ongoing studies indicate that the actual prevalence of acromegaly in the community may be higher than previous epidemiologic data suggest. Acromegaly can occur both sporadically and in the setting of familial conditions, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and Carney complex (CNC). Isolated familial somatotropinoma has been described and newer data suggest that acromegaly may also occur in non-MEN1/CNC families in combination with other pituitary tumor phenotypes. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon budget of a sugar beet crop
Moureaux, Christine ULg; Vilret, Amélie; Delvoye, Sébastien et al

in Abstracts and proceedings - 68th Congress 2005 (2005)

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See detailAcetaldehyde and the central effects of alcohol: Beyond the discrepancies between animal and human studies
Quertemont, Etienne ULg

in Alcohol & Alcoholism (2005), 40(Suppl.1), 23

Whereas human studies keep reporting evidence that acetaldehyde accumulation prevents alcohol drinking and alcoholism, animal studies support a rewarding rather than aversive role for acetaldehyde. In ... [more ▼]

Whereas human studies keep reporting evidence that acetaldehyde accumulation prevents alcohol drinking and alcoholism, animal studies support a rewarding rather than aversive role for acetaldehyde. In recent years, the reinforcing properties of acetaldehyde were demonstrated in various rodent strains and using different experimental methods. These results led to the hypothesis that acetaldehyde might be involved in the addictive properties of alcohol. The most recent experimental studies suggest that the apparent discrepancies between animal and human studies might be due to the localization of acetaldehyde accumulation. Whereas peripheral acetaldehyde accumulation leads to adverse reactions and prevents alcohol drinking, brain acetaldehyde is believed to be primarily reinforcing in both rodents and humans. In addition to its possible role in the reinforcing properties of alcohol, there is also evidence that acetaldehyde is involved in many other behavioral effects of ethanol. This presentation reviews the latest results about the behavioral properties of acetaldehyde. In both CD1 and C57BL/6J mice, acetaldehyde induces locomotor depressant, sedative and amnesic effects. These effects are observed when acetaldehyde is administered either in the periphery or directly into the brain. In contrast to previous studies in rats, we found no evidence of the stimulant effects of acetaldehyde over a wide range of doses, whether injected in the periphery or administered intracerebroventricularly. Additional studies with cyanamide, an aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor leading to peripheral and central acetaldehyde accumulations after ethanol administration, also confirm the role of acetaldehyde in the locomotor depressant, sedative and amnesic effects of ethanol. However, a key issue remains to be addressed in order to demonstrate the role of acetaldehyde in alcohol abuse. To date, it remains uncertain whether pharmacologically relevant acetaldehyde concentrations are formed in the brain after alcohol consumption in vivo. [less ▲]

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See detailBootstrap equations in effective theories
Vereshagin, Alexander; Vereshagin, Vladimir; Semenov-Tyan-Shanskiy, Kirill ULg

in Journal of Mathematical Sciences (2005), 125(2), 144-158

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See detailSi des Martiens débarquaient... La question du sens des apprentissages scolaires
Guillaume, Jean-François ULg; Xhonneux, Michel ULg

Article for general public (2005)

Interview croisée des deux auteurs, sur des questions liées à la finalité des apprentissages scolaires.

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See detailDe grenzen van de dendrochronologische dateringsmethode : de houten balken van het Monacoplein
Eeckhout, Jérôme ULg

in Oostende: Stadsvernieuwing en Archeologie (2005)

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See detailRecommendations for the registration of agents to be used in the prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis: updated recommendations from the Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science.
Abadie, Eric ULg; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Ringe, Johann D. et al

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2005), 35(1), 1-4

OBJECTIVES: The Group for the Respect and Excellence in Science (GREES) has reviewed and updated their recommendations for clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of new chemical entities to ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: The Group for the Respect and Excellence in Science (GREES) has reviewed and updated their recommendations for clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of new chemical entities to be used in the treatment and prevention of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP). METHODS: Consensus discussion of the committee. RESULTS: With the exception of steroid use posttransplantation, there is no need to differentiate between underlying diseases. Prevention and treatment for GIOP are dependent on exposure to glucocorticoids rather than T-scores as in postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO). If fracture data are obtained for PMO, it need not be repeated for GIOP, relying instead on bone mineral density (BMD) trials of at least 1 year. GREES recommends several changes in the previous guidance for GIOP. The committee saw no need to repeat preclinical studies if those have been previously done to assure bone quality in PMO. Similarly, phase I and phase II trials, if careful dose selection has been done for PMO, should not be repeated. The "prevention" and "treatment" claims should remain. Since the most recent evidence suggests significant increase in fracture risk for daily doses of prednisone of 5 mg/day or equivalent, clinical trials should concentrate on patients receiving at least this daily dosage. The emergence of bisphosphonates as the reference treatment, together with the rapid bone loss and high fracture incidence in glucocorticoid users, necessitates recommending a noninferiority trial design with lumbar spine BMD as the primary endpoint after 1 year. CONCLUSIONS: Registration of new chemical entities to be used in the management of GIOP should be granted, based on a 1-year noninferiority trial, using BMD as primary outcome and alendronate or risedronate as comparator. Demonstration of antifracture efficacy should have been previously demonstrated in PMO. [less ▲]

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See detailEvolution de l'écoulement de fluides non-newtoniens avec le temps d'agitation en cuve agitée par vélocimétrie par images de particules
Fransolet, Emmanuelle; Marchot, Pierre ULg; Toye, Dominique ULg et al

in SFGP (Ed.) Récents Progrès en Génie des procédés - N°92 - Le Génie des Procédés vers de nouveaux espaces, Actes du 10ème Congrès de la Société Française de Génie des Procédés, 20-22 septembre 2005, Toulouse, France (2005)

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See detailSemi-solid metal forming
Rassili, A.; Geuzaine, Christophe ULg; Dular, Patrick ULg et al

in Proceedings of the Computational Methods for Coupled Problems in Science and Enginieering Conference (2005)

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