References of "2004"
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See detailFebrile convulsions: an update
Lagae, L.; Ceulemans, B.; Misson, Jean-Paul ULg

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2004)

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See detailAlbert Henry et la dialectologie
Boutier, Marie-Guy ULg

in Guyaux, André; Wilmet, Marc (Eds.) Hommage à Albert Henry, Actes de la journée du 22 février organisée à la Sorbonne (2004)

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See detailPas si bête ... ou le propre de l'animal.
Poncin, Pascal ULg; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg; Ruwet, Jean-Claude

Conference (2004)

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See detailMECHANICAL STRAIN MODULATES MONOCYTE CHEMOTACTIC PROTEIN-1 AND IL-1BETA EXPRESSION BY CULTURED HUMAN AORTIC SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS
Defawe, Olivier; Colige, Alain ULg; Deroanne, Christophe ULg et al

in Cardiovascular Pathology (2004), 13(3 suppl), 189

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See detailBulletin du Réseau des Médiévistes belges de Langue française
Marchandisse, Alain ULg

Book published by RMBLF (2004)

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See detailExcitabilité nerveuse et neuropathies périphériques : résultats d’une étude multicentrique
Kuntzer, Thierry; Carrera, E; Boërio, D et al

in Neurophysiologie Clinique = Clinical Neurophysiology (2004)

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See detailFetal growth restriction: a workshop report
Cetin, I.; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg; Miozzo, M. et al

in Placenta (2004), 25(8-9), 753-757

Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with significantly increased perinatal morbidity and mortality as well as cardiovascular disease and glucose intolerance in adult life. A number of ... [more ▼]

Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with significantly increased perinatal morbidity and mortality as well as cardiovascular disease and glucose intolerance in adult life. A number of disorders from genetic to metabolic, vascular, coagulative, autoimmune, as well as infectious, can influence fetal growth by damaging the placenta, leading to IUGR as a result of many possible fetal, placental and maternal disorders. Strict definitions of IUGR and of its severity are needed in order to eventually distinguish among different phenotypes, such as gestational age at onset, degree of growth restriction and presence of hypoxia. This report explores and reviews some of the most recent developments in both clinical and basic research on intrauterine growth restriction, by seeking mechanisms that involve genetic factors, utero-placental nutrient availability and vascular growth factors. New exciting findings on the genomic imprinting defects potentially associated with IUGR, and the placental anomalies associated with the decreased nutrient transport are summarized. Moreover, recent data on angiogenic growth factors as well as new information arising from application of gene chip technologies are discussed. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailLes macrolichens de Belgique, du Luxembourg et du nord de la France. Clés de détermination
Sérusiaux, Emmanuël ULg; Diederich, Paul; Lambinon, Jacques ULg

Book published by Musée d'histoire naturelle Luxembourg (2004)

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See detailApplication of different mathematical models for the prediction of bone regeneration in an in vivo bone chamber
Van Oosterwyck, Hans; Geris, Liesbet ULg; Gerisch, A. et al

in Lecture notes of workshop Numerical models of bone adaptation and repair (2004)

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See detailHistology and physiology of skin aging
Quatresooz, Pascale ULg

Conference (2004)

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See detailTo what extent can management variables explain species assemblages? A study of carabid beetles in forests
De Warnaffe, G. D. B.; Dufrêne, Marc ULg

in Ecography (2004), 27(6), 701-714

Studies concerning the influence of forest management on invertebrate communities often focus on a limited set of chosen variables and rarely quantify the importance of management as opposed to other ... [more ▼]

Studies concerning the influence of forest management on invertebrate communities often focus on a limited set of chosen variables and rarely quantify the importance of management as opposed to other influences. We aimed at: 1) comparing the importance for species assemblages of habitat variables defined by management with those independent of it; 2) understanding the ecological significance of the variation remaining when both management and non-management variables are used. We caught carabid beetles according to a stratified pitfall sampling based on forest structure, tree composition and stand age. Forty-nine habitat variables were measured using three spatial scales. We decomposed the variation of species assemblages with successive constrained ordinations based on sets of variables, and studied the life traits of the species least and best explained by the model including all of the variables. Forest structure, composition and stand age showed important effects but explained a relatively small part of the overall variation in species assemblages. Management accounted for ca 30% of the variation, but non-management variables had a significant impact and the interaction between management and non-management sets resulted in significant influences. Most species for which the variation was highly explained by the model were generally large and with inefficient wings, while the least explained species were small. Our study suggests that: 1) even with highly controlled samples, the influence of management on species assemblages should not be studied by a limited set of categorical variables; 2) management variables may interact with factors outside of the manager's control; 3) a significant part of the variation cannot be explained by habitat variables and needs taking ecological processes into account; 4) rules to optimise constrained ordination techniques applied to species-habitat studies can be proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailAllogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation as treatment for hematological malignancies: a review.
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Storb, Rainer

in Springer Seminars in Immunopathology (2004), 26(1-2), 71-94

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) was originally developed as a form of rescue from high-dose chemoradiotherapy, which is given both to eradicate malignancy and provide sufficient ... [more ▼]

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) was originally developed as a form of rescue from high-dose chemoradiotherapy, which is given both to eradicate malignancy and provide sufficient immunosuppression for allogeneic engraftment. The first attempts of allogeneic HCT in humans met with little success. However, a better understanding of the complexities of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system has allowed selecting compatible sibling donors, and the development of postgrafting immunosuppressive regimens has helped prevent serious graft-versus-host disease, thereby changing the role of allogeneic HCT from a desperate therapeutic maneuver to a curative treatment modality for many patients with malignant hematological diseases. In addition, the establishment of large registries of HLA-typed volunteers has permitted finding suitable unrelated donors for many patients without family donors. Further advances in the immunogenetics of HLA, especially typing by molecular techniques, have improved results after unrelated HCT, which have begun resembling those obtained with HLA-identical sibling grafts, at least in young patients. Important advances have also been made in the prevention and treatment of infectious complications and in other areas of supportive care. Since the late seventies, it has been recognized that allogeneic immunocompetent cells transplanted with the stem cells, or arising from them, mediated therapeutic anti-tumor effects independent of the action of the high-dose therapy, termed graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects. This has prompted the recent development of non-myeloablative conditioning regimens for allogeneic HCT that have opened the way to include elderly patients and those with comorbid conditions. Remaining challenges include further advances in the prevention and treatment of both severe graft-versus-host disease and infections. Also, progress in adoptive transfer of T cells with relative tumor specificity and disease-targeted therapy with agents such as Imatinib, Rituximab or radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies would make allogeneic HCT even more effective. [less ▲]

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See detailTrace elements deficiencies in the pathogenesis of respiratory distress syndrome in the mature newborn calf
Guyot, Hugues ULg; Aliaoui, Hamani; Rollin, Frédéric ULg

Poster (2004)

In Belgium, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is one of the leading causes of neonatal death in the mature hypermuscled Belgian Blue calf (BB) but also occurs in other cattle breeds. Major clinical ... [more ▼]

In Belgium, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is one of the leading causes of neonatal death in the mature hypermuscled Belgian Blue calf (BB) but also occurs in other cattle breeds. Major clinical signs (tachypnea, tachycardia and sometimes depression) develop in the first hours after birth and are due to insufficiency of functional surfactant. Knowing that trace elements deficiencies can slow pulmonary maturation, the aim of this study was to investigate trace elements status in 10 RDS affected BB herds in comparison with 6 reference herds without any evidence of RDS. In each herd, blood was sampled from 10 pregnant or freshly calved healthy cows. In each blood sample, the plasmatic zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) contents and erythrocytic glutathion peroxydase activity (GSH-pxe) were measured and considered normal when above 15 μmol/L, 14 μmol/L and 250 IU/gHb, respectively. A herd was deficient in one element if at least 30 % of sampled animals were out of normal range for this element. Milk was also sampled and pooled from 10 other cows or, when possible, bulk milk was taken. Milk iodine (I) content was considered normal when above 80 μg/L. Results were compared between groups by Chi-square test. All RDS affected herds had low Zn and Cu concentrations and low GSH-pxe activity. Eight out of 10 had low I in milk. In the non-RDS affected herds, only 1 herd was deficient in I, Zn, Cu and had low GSH-pxe activity, 2 herds were deficient in Zn and Cu and 1 herd was deficient in Cu. RDS affected herds were significantly more often deficient in I and GSH-pxe than non-affected herds. It seems that the trace elements selenium (Se), Zn and Cu play an essential role in the development of RDS. The same applies for I, although not deficient in all herds. The reason for this might be that milk samples were taken during lactation, when cows’ nutrition was different and, in any case, supplemented in I. In mature babies, the same RDS is observed but its etiology is still unclear, although I deficiency in the mother is suspected to play a major role in pathogenesis. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that a Se-dependent deiodinase is responsible for transformation of thyroxine (T4) into tri-iodothyronine (T3), which is essential for effective surfactant production. In conclusion, results suggest an association between RDS in mature newborn calves and trace elements deficiencies, especially Se and I, that can be responsible for primary surfactant insufficiency. [less ▲]

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