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See detailÉcriture et système de prescription. L’exemple du “Lecteur du Petit Journal” (Zola, 1865)
Durand, Pascal ULg

in Jurt, J.; Einfalt, M. (Eds.) Le texte et le contexte. Analyses du champ littéraire français (XIXe et XXe siècle) (2002)

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See detailHeat shock proteins. I : Classification and roles in pathological processes
Wirth, Delphine; Gustin, Pascal ULg; Drion, Pierre ULg et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2002), 146(4), 201-216

All living systems have evolved mechanisms to maintain homeostasis in the face of rapid environmental changes. When exposed to elevated temperatures, most of the cells activate the synthesis of a specific ... [more ▼]

All living systems have evolved mechanisms to maintain homeostasis in the face of rapid environmental changes. When exposed to elevated temperatures, most of the cells activate the synthesis of a specific group of proteins called Heat Shock Proteins (Hsps). This heat shock response, under control of specific transcription factors, the Heat Shock factors (HSF), is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism, from bacteria to humans. Heat Shock Proteins are classified into families according to their molecular weight (Hsp 25, 40, 70, 90, 105). They play the role of molecular chaperones by binding and protecting other molecules (proteins, RNAs). The function of Hsp is to prevent accumulation of non-native proteins either by assisting proper folding of polypeptides or by driving them to proteosome pathway for degradation. Hsps are involved in various pathological processes that are accompanied by protein alterations such as chronic or degenerative diseases. This review describes structural and functional characteristics of the six main Hsps classes. It also focuses on their respective role in highly studied pathologies. The diversity of Hsps implications in these diseases explains that they became recently a strategic target in development of new therapeutic strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailDe zinsaccentuering in de tussentaal van Franstalige leerders van het Nederlands
Hiligsmann, Philippe; Rasier, Laurent ULg

in N/F (2002), 1

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See detailTextes hagiographiques et méthodes quantitatives
Philippart de Foy, Caroline ULg

Scientific conference (2002)

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See detailA constitutive model for North Sea Chalk. Application to reservoir compaction and to waterflooding
Charlier, Robert ULg; Collin, Frédéric ULg; Schroeder, Christian ULg et al

in Pande, G. N.; Pietruszczak, S. (Eds.) Nomerical models in Geomechanics (2002)

Subsidence of chalk oil reservoirs in North Sea is related to the chalk compaction induced by fluid depletion and by the water – chalk interaction. A constitutive model is developed in order to take into ... [more ▼]

Subsidence of chalk oil reservoirs in North Sea is related to the chalk compaction induced by fluid depletion and by the water – chalk interaction. A constitutive model is developed in order to take into account these two effects. It is based on frictional – cap elastoplasticity and on the Barcelona unsaturated soil model. Oil – water – chalk interaction is modeled through the suction variable. The two saturating fluids flow is also developed. After implementation into a finite element code, these tools allow to simulate a waterflooding experiment on a chalk sample. The model appears to reproduce qualitatively and quantitatively the experimental results. [less ▲]

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See detailSymmetry of neurography
WANG, François-Charles ULg; Horward, A.

in Journal of Neurology (2002), 249

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See detailIdentification of a karyopherin alpha 2 recognition site in PLAG1, which functions as a nuclear localization signal.
Braem, Caroline V; Kas, Koen; Meyen, Eva et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2002), 277(22), 19673-8

The activation of the pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) is the most frequent gain-of-function mutation found in pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands. To gain more insight into the regulation of ... [more ▼]

The activation of the pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) is the most frequent gain-of-function mutation found in pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands. To gain more insight into the regulation of PLAG1 function, we searched for PLAG1-interacting proteins. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we identified karyopherin alpha2 as a PLAG1-interacting protein. Physical interaction between PLAG1 and karyopherin alpha2 was confirmed by an in vitro glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay. Karyopherin alpha2 escorts proteins into the nucleus via interaction with a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) composed of short stretches of basic amino acids. Two putative NLSs were identified in PLAG1. The predicted NLS1 (KRKR) was essential for physical interaction with karyopherin alpha2 in glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay, and its mutation resulted in decreased nuclear import of PLAG1. Moreover, NLS1 was able to drive the nuclear import of the cytoplasmic protein beta-galactosidase. In contrast, predicted NLS2 of PLAG1 (KPRK) was not involved in karyopherin alpha2 binding nor in its nuclear import. The residual nuclear import of PLAG1 after mutation of the NLS1 was assigned to the zinc finger domain of PLAG1. These observations indicate that the nuclear import of PLAG1 is governed by its zinc finger domain and by NLS1, a karyopherin alpha2 recognition site. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular characterization of a specific thiamine triphosphatase widely expressed in mammalian tissues
Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Makarchikov, Alexander F; Antunes, Adelio F et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2002), 277(16), 13771-13777

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found at low concentrations in most animal tissues, and recent data suggest that it may act as a phosphate donor for the phosphorylation of some proteins. In the mammalian ... [more ▼]

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found at low concentrations in most animal tissues, and recent data suggest that it may act as a phosphate donor for the phosphorylation of some proteins. In the mammalian brain, ThTP synthesis is rapid, but its steady-state concentration remains low, presumably because of rapid hydrolysis. In this report we purified a soluble thiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase; EC 3.6.1.28) from calf brain. The bovine ThTPase is a 24-kDa monomer, hydrolyzing ThTP with virtually absolute specificity. Partial sequence data obtained from the purified bovine enzyme by tandem mass spectrometry were used to search the GenBank(TM) data base. A significant identity was found with only one human sequence, the hypothetical 230-amino acid protein MGC2652. The coding regions from human and bovine brain mRNA were amplified by reverse transcription-PCR, cloned in Escherichia coli, and sequenced. The human open reading frame was expressed in E. coli as a GST fusion protein. Transformed bacteria had a high isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside-inducible ThTPase activity. The recombinant ThTPase had properties similar to those of human brain ThTPase, and it was specific for ThTP. The mRNA was expressed in most human tissues but at relatively low levels. This is the first report of a molecular characterization of a specific ThTPase. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalyses dendrochronologiques de la maison dite Nimax et de la maison dite Steiler
Hoffsummer, Patrick ULg; Eeckhout, Jérôme ULg; Houbrechts, David ULg

in Zimmer, John (Ed.) Aux origines de la Ville de Luxembourg (2002)

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See detailHepatic insulin resistance in obese non-diabetic subjects and in type 2 diabetic patients.
Paquot, Nicolas ULg; Scheen, André ULg; Dirlewanger, Mirjam et al

in Obesity Research (2002), 10(3), 129-34

OBJECTIVE: Obese non-diabetic patients are characterized by an extra-hepatic insulin resistance. Whether obese patients also have decreased hepatic insulin sensitivity remains controversial. RESEARCH ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Obese non-diabetic patients are characterized by an extra-hepatic insulin resistance. Whether obese patients also have decreased hepatic insulin sensitivity remains controversial. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: To estimate their hepatic insulin sensitivity, we measured the rate of exogenous insulin infusion required to maintain mildly elevated glycemia in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, obese non-diabetic patients, and lean control subjects during constant infusions of somatostatin and physiological low-glucagon replacement infusions. To account for differences in insulin concentrations among the three groups of subjects, an additional protocol was also performed in healthy lean subjects with higher insulin infusion rates and exogenous dextrose infusion. RESULTS: The insulin infusion rate required to maintain glycemia at 8.5 mM was increased 4-fold in obese patients with type 2 diabetes and 1.5-fold in obese non-diabetic patients. The net endogenous glucose production (measured with 6,6-(2)H(2)-glucose) and total glucose output (measured with 2-(2)H(1)-glucose) were approximately 30% lower in the patients than in the lean subjects. Net endogenous glucose production and total glucose output were both markedly increased in both groups of obese patients compared with lean control subjects during hyperinsulinemia. DISCUSSION: Our data indicate that both obese non-diabetic and obese type 2 diabetic patients have a blunted suppressive action of insulin on glucose production, indicating hepatic and renal insulin resistance. [less ▲]

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See detailDetermination Of The Methionine Requirement Of Finishing Double-Muscled Belgian Blue Bulls With A Three-Step Method
Froidmont, Eric; Beckers, Yves ULg; Thewis, André ULg

in Canadian Journal of Animal Science (2002), 82(1), 95-102

A three-step technique was used to determine total amino acids (AA) and the first limiting AA requirements in finishing double-muscled Belgian Blue (dmBB) bulls. In a first experiment, three dmBB bulls ... [more ▼]

A three-step technique was used to determine total amino acids (AA) and the first limiting AA requirements in finishing double-muscled Belgian Blue (dmBB) bulls. In a first experiment, three dmBB bulls (505 ± 21 kg) received a low metabolizable protein diet containing 25% meadow hay and 75% concentrate. Net energy supply was adequate for maximizing daily gains because of continuous infusion of dextrose into the duodenum. The intestinal apparent disappearance of essential AA (EAA) averaged 70.8% and was the lowest for histidine (61.3%) and the highest for arginine (79.9%). In a second experiment, four dmBB bulls (517 ± 16 kg) received the same diet supplemented with duodenal infusion of dextrose and four doses of Na-caseinate (17, 33, 50 and 66% of metabolizable dietary AA) in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Nitrogen retention for the basal diet alone and the four increasing supplements of Na-caseinate averaged 61, 64, 74, 75 and 78 g d–1, respectively. A supply of 720 g d–1 of metabolizable AA was defined as optimising the N utilization for animal growth. Based on patterns of plasma concentrations, methionine and phenylalanine were probably the limiting AA. In a third experiment, five dmBB bulls (513 ± 60 kg) fed the basal diet received duodenal infusion of dextrose and AA, equivalent to the second dose in exp. 2 except for the supply of metabolizable methionine (12.8, 15.1, 17.6, 20.1, 22.6 and 25.1 g d–1) that varied in a 6 × 6 Latin square design with one missing animal. On the basis of N retention, the metabolizable methionine requirement was estimated to 22.8 g d–1 and corresponded to 360 mg of metabolizable methionine per gram of N retained. [less ▲]

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See detailGlacial-interglacial changes of continental weathering: estimates of the related CO2 and HCO3- flux variations and their uncertainties
Munhoven, Guy ULg

in Global and Planetary Change (2002), 33(1-2), 155-176

A range of estimates for the glacial-interglacial variations in CO, consumption and HCO3- production rates by continental weathering processes were calculated with two models of continental weathering ... [more ▼]

A range of estimates for the glacial-interglacial variations in CO, consumption and HCO3- production rates by continental weathering processes were calculated with two models of continental weathering: the Gibbs and Kump Weathering Model (GKWM) [Paleoceanography 9(4) (1994) 529] and an adapted version of Amiotte Suchet and Probst's Global Erosion Model for CO2 Consumption (GEM-CO2) [C. R, Acad. Sci. Paris, Ser. 11317 (1993) 615; Tellus 47B (1995) 273]. Both models link CO2 consumption and HCO3- production rates to the global distributions of lithology and runoff. A spectrum of 16 estimates for the runoff distribution at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was constructed on the basis of two different data sets for present-day runoff and climate results from eight GCM climate simulation experiments carried out in the framework of the Paleo Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP). With these forcings, GKWM produced 3.55-9.0 Tmol/year higher and GEM-CO2 4.7-13.25 Tmol/year higher global HCO3- (1 Tmol=10(12) mol) production rates at the LGM, Mean variations (plus/minus one standard error of the mean with 7 df) were 6.2+/-0.6 and 9.4+/-1.0 Tmol/year, respectively. The global CO2 consumption rates obtained with GKWM were 1.05-4.5 Tmol/year (mean: 2.8+/-0.4 Tmol/year) higher at the LGM than at present. With GEM-CO2 this increase was 1.95-7.15 Tmol/year (mean: 4.8+/-0.6 Tmol/year). The large variability in the changes obtained with each weathering model was primarily due to the variability in the GCM results. The increase in the CO2 consumption rate due to continental shelf exposure at the LGM was always more than 60% larger than its reduction due to ice cover. For HCOT production rates, the increase related to shelf exposure was always more than twice as large as the decrease due to ice cover. Flux variations in the areas exposed both now and at the LGM were, in absolute value, always more than 3.5 times lower than those in the shelf environment. The calculated CO2 consumption rates by carbonate weathering were consistently higher at the LGM, by 2.45-4.5 Tmol/year (mean: 3.4+/-0.2 Tmol/year) according to GKWM and by 2.75-6.25 Tmol/year (mean: 4.6+/-0.4 Tmol/year) according to GEM-CO, For silicate weathering, GKWM produced variations ranging between a 1.9 Tmol/year decrease and a 0.4 Tmol/year increase for the LGM (mean variation: -0.7+/-0.2 Tmol/year); GEM-CO, produced variations ranging between a 0.8 Tmol/year decrease and a 1.05 Tmol/year increase (mean variation: +0.2+/-0.2 Tmol/year). In the mean, the calculated variations of CO2 and HCO3- fluxes would contribute to reduce atmospheric p(CO2) by 5.7+/-1.3 ppmv (GKWM) or 3 12.1+/-1.7 ppmv (GEM-CO2), which might thus represent a non-negligible part of the observed glacial interglacial variation of similar to 75 ppmv. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailLa beauté dans l'art du règne d'Amenhotep IV - Akhénaton
Laboury, Dimitri ULg

in Warmenbol, Eugène (Ed.) Beautés d'Égypte. "Celles que les ans ne peuvent moisonner". Catalogue de l'exposition créée au Musée du Malgré-Tout à Treignes (Belgique) du 2 juin au 15 décembre 2002 (2002)

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See detailLe développement durable : tes premiers pas, Dossier pour l’enseignement secondaire inférieur
Merenne-Schoumaker, Bernadette ULg; Brück, Laurent

Book published by SSTC (2002)

Quatre parties : le smodes de production et consommation, le stransports, l'urbanisation et développement durable, premier bilan. Dossier conçu pour des élèves de 12 à 15 ans

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See detailSubcellular Localization Of The Bovine Leukemia Virus R3 And G4 Accessory Proteins
Lefebvre, Laurent; Ciminale, Vincenzo; Vanderplasschen, Alain ULg et al

in Journal of Virology (2002), 76(15), 7843-7854

Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is a complex retrovirus that belongs to the Deltaretrovirus genus, which also includes Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Both viruses contain an X region coding for ... [more ▼]

Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is a complex retrovirus that belongs to the Deltaretrovirus genus, which also includes Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Both viruses contain an X region coding for at least four proteins: Tax and Rex, which are involved in transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation, respectively, and the accessory proteins R3 and G4 (for BLV) and p12(I), p13(II), and p30(II) (for HTLV-1). The present study was aimed at characterizing the subcellular localization of BLV R3 and G4. The results of immunofluorescence experiments on transfected HeLa Tat cells demonstrated that R3 is located in the nucleus and in cellular membranes, as previously reported for HTLV-1 p12(1). In contrast, G4, like p13(II), is localized both in the nucleus and in mitochondria. In addition, we have shown that G4 harbors a mitochondrial targeting signal consisting of a hydrophobic region and an amphipathic alpha-helix. Thus, despite a lack of significant primary sequence homology, R3 and p12(1) and G4 and p13(II) exhibit similar targeting properties, suggesting possible overlap in their functional properties. [less ▲]

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See detailSpeed of sound measurements in the evaluation of bone properties in Holstein
Sandersen, Charlotte ULg; Guyot, Hugues ULg; Vandeputte, Sébastien ULg et al

in Proceedings of the XXII World Buiatrics Congress (2002)

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See detailEffect of omp10 or omp19 deletion on Brucella abortus outer membrane properties and virulence in mice.
Tibor, Anne; Wansard, Valerie; Bielartz, Valery et al

in Infection and Immunity (2002), 70(10), 5540-6

The distinctive properties of Brucella outer membrane have been considered to be critical for Brucella sp. virulence. Among the outer membrane molecules possibly related to these properties, Omp10 and ... [more ▼]

The distinctive properties of Brucella outer membrane have been considered to be critical for Brucella sp. virulence. Among the outer membrane molecules possibly related to these properties, Omp10 and Omp19 are immunoreactive outer membrane lipoproteins. Moreover, these proteins of Brucella could constitute a new family of outer membrane proteins specifically encountered in the family RHIZOBIACEAE: We evaluated the impact of omp10 or omp19 deletion on Brucella abortus outer membrane properties and virulence in mice. The omp10 mutant was dramatically attenuated for survival in mice and was defective for growth in minimal medium but was not impaired in intracellular growth in vitro, nor does it display clear modification of the outer membrane properties. Significantly fewer brucellae were recovered from the spleens of mice infected with the omp19 mutant than from those of mice infected with the parent strain at 4 and 8 weeks postinfection. The omp19 mutant exhibited an increase in sensitivity to the polycation polymyxin B and to sodium deoxycholate. These results indicate that inactivation of the omp19 gene alters the outer membrane properties of B. abortus. [less ▲]

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