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See detailThe plasma environment of Mars : from the shocked solar wind down to the ionosphere
Trotignon, J.-G.; Parrot, M.; Cerisier, Jean-Claude et al

in Planetary and Space Science (2000), 48(12-14), 1181-1191

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See detailL'évolution de l'économie agricole et horticole de la Région wallonne 1999
Lebailly, Philippe ULg; Burny, Philippe ULg; Wabnik, Marie-Christine et al

Book published by Conseil supérieur wallon de l'Agriculture, de l'Agro-alimentaire et de l'Alimentation (2000)

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See detailL'analyse de la variance multivariée et l'analyse canonique discriminante : principes et applications
Palm, Rodolphe ULg

in Notes de Statistique et d'Informatique (2000), (1), 40

This note describes the principles of multivariate analysis of variance and of canonical discriminant analysis. The methods are illustrated by two examples.

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See detailNature du phosphore dans deux échantillons de gypse Imacid
Bastin, David ULg

Report (2000)

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See detailLe syndrome du canal lent
Zeevaert, Bernard; WANG, François-Charles ULg; CRIELAARD, Jean-Michel ULg

Conference (2000)

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See detailMeasurements of hindlimb blood flow recorded using Doppler ultrasound during administration of vasoactive agents in halothane-anesthetized horses
Raisis, Anthea L; Young, Lesley E; Meire, Hylton B et al

in Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound : The Official Journal of the American College of Veterinary Radiology & the International Veterinary Radiology Association (2000), 41(1), 64-72

The purpose of the study was to determine the ability of Doppler ultrasound to detect changes in femoral blood flow during pharmacologic manipulation of arterial blood pressure. Doppler ultrasonography ... [more ▼]

The purpose of the study was to determine the ability of Doppler ultrasound to detect changes in femoral blood flow during pharmacologic manipulation of arterial blood pressure. Doppler ultrasonography was performed in the femoral vessels of six halothane-anesthetized horses before and during administration of phenylephrine HCI and sodium nitroprusside. The time-averaged mean velocity and volumetric flow were calculated. The contour of the velocity waveform was assessed, and the early diastolic deceleration slope (EDDS) and pulsatility index (PI) were calculated. Administration of phenylephrine HCI resulted in increased mean aortic blood pressure (MABP) by 40% (29.3-53.0%). This caused significant decrease in cardiac output (26.8 to 13.5 l/min), femoral arterial velocity (left artery 7.20 to 4.00 cm/s; right artery 5.01 to 3.39 cm/s) and volumetric flow (left artery 556 to 221 ml/min; right artery 397 to 193 ml/min) in the femoral vessels and significant increase in systemic vascular resistance (163 to 433 dyn-s/cm5), EDDS (1a: 285 to 468: ra: 250 to 481) and PI (1a: 9.38 to 20.4; ra 17.1 to 29.1). Administration of sodium nitroprusside resulted in a decreased MABP of 27.2% (22.5-33%). This increased cardiac output (20.8 to 32.4 L/min), however, no significant changes were observed in femoral blood flow. Despite obvious changes in the waveform contour, no significant change occurred in EDDS or PI. These results suggest that Doppler ultrasound may be useful for measuring femoral blood flow in anesthetized horses. However, waveform analysis appears to be limited when multiple changes occur in central and peripheral haemodynamics. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurodegenerative and morphogenic changes in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy do not depend on the expression of the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calbindin, or calretinin.
Bouilleret, V.; Schwaller, B.; Schurmans, Stéphane ULg et al

in Neuroscience (2000), 97(1), 47-58

The functional role of the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calretinin, and calbindin D-28k for epileptogenesis and long-term seizure-related alterations of the hippocampal formation was assessed in ... [more ▼]

The functional role of the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calretinin, and calbindin D-28k for epileptogenesis and long-term seizure-related alterations of the hippocampal formation was assessed in single- and double-knockout mice, using a kainate model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. The effects of a unilateral intrahippocampal injection of kainic acid were assessed at one day, 30 days, and four months post-injection, using various markers of GABAergic interneurons (GABA-transporter type 1, GABA(A)-receptor alpha1 subunit, calretinin, calbindin D-28k, somatostatin, and neuropeptide Y). Parvalbumin-deficient, parvalbumin/calbindin-deficient, and parvalbumin/calretinin-deficient mice exhibited no difference in cytoarchitecture of the hippocampal formation and in the number, distribution, or morphology of interneurons compared to wild-type mice. Likewise, mutant mice were not more vulnerable to acute kainate-induced excitotoxicity or to long-term effects of recurrent focal seizures, and exhibited the same pattern of neurochemical alterations (e.g., bilateral induction of neuropeptide Y in granule cells) and morphogenic changes (enlargement and dispersion of dentate gyrus granule cells) as wild-type animals. Quantification of interneurons revealed no significant difference in neuronal vulnerability among the genotypes.These results indicate that the calcium-binding proteins investigated here are not essential for determining the neurochemical phenotype of interneurons. Furthermore, they are not protective against kainate-induced excitotoxicity in this model, and do not appear to modulate the overall level of excitability of the hippocampus. Finally, seizure-induced changes in gene expression in granule cells, which normally express high levels of calcium-binding proteins, apparently were not affected by the gene deletions analysed [less ▲]

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See detailPilootproject : ontslagmanagement in Belgische ziekenhuizen. [Pilot study : discharge management in Belgian hospitals]. Final report, 2000
Abraham, I; Bollen, S; de Froidmont, C et al

Report (2000)

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See detailA FETD Approach for the Modeling of Antennas
Geuzaine, Christophe ULg; Meys, B.; Beauvois, Véronique ULg et al

in IEEE Transactions on Magnetics (2000), 36(4), 892--896

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See detailRadiosurgery with Linac and Micro Multi-Leaf Collimator (mMLC)
Villemure, J-G; Pica, A; COUCKE, Philippe ULg et al

in European Journal of Neurology (2000), 142(10), 1188

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See detailRespiratory responses of mature horses to intravenous lobeline bolus
Marlin, D. J.; Roberts, C. A.; Schroter, R. C. et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2000), 32(3), 200-207

The respiratory stimulant lobeline has been used in equine clinical practice to increase inspiratory and expiratory airflow rates at rest in orderto facilitate investigation of both lower and upper airway ... [more ▼]

The respiratory stimulant lobeline has been used in equine clinical practice to increase inspiratory and expiratory airflow rates at rest in orderto facilitate investigation of both lower and upper airway function. Some of the responses to lobeline in the pony have been reported, but the detailed time course, effect of dose, possible side effects and reproducibility associated with lobeline administration have not been described in the horse. Respiratory airflow rates and oesophageal pre s s u re were measured with a Fleisch No. 5 pneumotachometer and lightweight facemask and amicrotip pressure transducer catheter, respectively. The output of the Fleisch pneumotachometer was calibrated for flow rates up to ± 70 l/s. Seven mature horses with no clinical signs of respiratory disease were studied. Investigations were conducted to determine: (1) the responses to different doses of lobeline (0.15, 0.20, 0.25 and 0.30 mg/kg bwt) as a rapid i.v. bolus (6 horses); (2) arterial blood gases during and after lobeline administration (0.20 mg/kg bwt; 3 horses); and (3) the reproducibility of lobeline-stimulated hyperpnoea (5 horses; 2 doses of 0.20 mg/kg bwt lobeline, 15 min apart). All horses tolerated the lobeline-stimulated hyperpnoea well, although one always coughed or snorted at the onset. Mild tremor was noted following the highest dose in several horses. Apnoea of approximately 40 s was common after the hyperpnoea. Both tidal volume (VT) and frequency (fR) increased with lobeline dose. During peak hyperpnoea at a dose of 0.30 mg/kg bwt, peak inspired flow rate (PIF), peak expired flow rate (PEF) and minute ventilation (.VE) were mean ± s.e. 41 ± 5 l/s, 61 ± 10 l/s and 920 ± 99 l/min, respectively. The hyperpnoea also caused marked changes in arterial PaO2, PaCO2 and pHa at 90 s after lobeline (0.20 mg/kg bwt) administration (mean ± s.e. 146.0 ± 6.9 mmHg, 20.6 ± 0.8 mmHg and 7.707 ± 0.020, respectively) compared to at rest (mean ± s.e. 104.0 ± 4.0 mmHg, 50.6 ± 2.8 mmHg and 7.432 ± 0.012). Dynamic lung compliance (Cdyn) was unaltered by lobeline administration. The lobeline-induced hyperpnoea was highly reproducible, with no significant difference in any of the parameters during 2 stimulations 15 min apart. Lobeline induced highly reproducible responses without any apparent adverse effects and may be useful in the investigation of pulmonary function in healthy horses and those with airway disease. [less ▲]

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See detailJeunes sans emploi: professiion chômeur
Robert, Jocelyne ULg

in Lemaire, Jacques; Susanne, Charles (Eds.) Avoir vingt ans en l'an 2000, pour quoi faire? (2000)

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See detailFragmentation assessment using a single value: proposal of a new measure.
Bogaert, Jan ULg; Ceulemans, R; Van Hecke, P

in Symposium on biodiversity: from genes to landscapes. (2000)

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See detailLes labels dans le secteur agricole wallon : situation et perspectives
Burny, Philippe ULg

in Association belge d'Economie Rurale (Ed.) Quatrième workshop pour économistes agricoles : proceedings (2000)

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See detailBeta-radiation for coronary in-stent restenosis
Latchem, D-R; Urban, P; Goy, JJ et al

in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions (2000), 51(4), 422-429

To determine the feasibility and safety of an intracoronary beta-radiation device in preventing the recurrence of in-stent restenosis (ISR) after successful angioplasty, we studied 37 patients treated ... [more ▼]

To determine the feasibility and safety of an intracoronary beta-radiation device in preventing the recurrence of in-stent restenosis (ISR) after successful angioplasty, we studied 37 patients treated with beta-radiation (30-mm strontium-90 source) after angioplasty. The mean reference diameter was 2.9 ± 0.5 mm, and 62% of lesions were diffuse, including four total occlusions. Beta-radiation was successfully delivered in 36 of 37 (97%) cases. Over the course of 7.1 ± 4.5 mo follow-up, there were no myocardial infarctions and three deaths: one from preexisting malignancy, one from progressive cardiac failure, and one from sudden cardiac death. Target vessel revascularization (TVR) was performed in seven of 36 (19%) patients. Thirty patients underwent angiography at 6 mo; three (10%) experienced restenosis (diameter stenosis > 50%) at the target site, four (13%) had edge stenoses, and two (7%) had late (> 1 mo) thrombotic occlusions. Beta-radiation for ISR is associated with encouragingly low rates of target lesion restenosis and TVR. Further improvements are needed to solve the limitations of the edge effect and late occlusion. [less ▲]

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See detailVariability of Doppler ultrasound measurements of hindlimb blood flow in conscious horses
Raisis, Anthea L; Young, L. E.; Meire, H. B. et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2000), 32(2), 125-132

Ultrasonography of the left and right femoral artery and vein was performed in 5 conscious horses. Velocity waveforms, recorded using low pulse repetition frequency, were used to calculate time-averaged ... [more ▼]

Ultrasonography of the left and right femoral artery and vein was performed in 5 conscious horses. Velocity waveforms, recorded using low pulse repetition frequency, were used to calculate time-averaged mean velocity (TAV), velocity of component a (TaVa), velocity of component b (TaVb) and volumetric flow. Waveform analysis included calculation of early diastolic deceleration slope (EDDS) and pulsatility index (PI) and subjective description of the waveform. Measurements were recorded at monthly intervals for 6 months. The repeated measurements were used to determine the within-horse variation. Horses were then anaesthetised with halothane and the same measurements recorded 60 min after induction. Differences between measurements recorded in conscious and anaesthetised horses were determined. Within-horse variability for diameters of femoral arteries and veins was small (CV<10%). Within variability for all other measurements was marked (CV>11%), with within-horse variability being the largest for femoral venous flow (CV>35%). Source of variability was measurement error and biological variation. Despite variability in conscious horses it was possible to detect changes in blood flow during anaesthesia. In the femoral arteries, volumetric flow was lower and EDDS and PI was higher in anaesthetised horses. In the femoral veins, volumetric flow was also lower in anaesthetised horses. Therefore Doppler ultrasound appears to be a useful technique for studying blood flow in conscious and anaesthetised horses [less ▲]

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