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See detailLes comtes et ducs de Tours au VIe siècle
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

in Bulletin de la Classe des Lettres et des Sciences Morales et Politiques (1900), 12

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See detailUn règlement de comptes
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

in Archives Belges (Belgisch Archief) (1900)

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See detailLes ducs et comtes d'Auvergne au VIe siècle
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

in Revue d'Auvergne (1900)

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See detailRapport de M. Kurth, premier commissaire au concours annuel de 1900, section d'histoire et de littérature
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

in Bulletin de la Classe des Lettres et des Sciences Morales et Politiques (1900), 5

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See detailLes nationalités en Auvergne au VIe siècle
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

in Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique (1900), 4

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See detailPropriétés des solides sous pression, diffusion de la matière solide, mouvements internes de la matière solide
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Société chimique de Belgique (Ed.) Walthère Spring : Oeuvres complètes (1900)

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See detailSur la floculation des milieux troubles
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de la Classe des Sciences. Académie Royale de Belgique (1900), (7), 483-520

Spring, W. Bull. Acad. roy. Belgique. (1899), 37, 790-815; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). In this very interesting stand the ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Bull. Acad. roy. Belgique. (1899), 37, 790-815; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). In this very interesting stand the author gives comprehensive preparation of the philosophy, which led it with its numerous individual investigations, and over the results of these test series. It is possible to seemed that the sedimentary rocks formed, because the apparent is not plastic and weldable bodies accept this characteristics have under pressure. Indeed it showed up with many materials, in particular metals that with pressure alone, without heating up from the powder a connected block develops. This characteristics are proportional with different metals of their weld ability. In addition, with the baud a pressure of 10000 atmospheres is sufficient not yet, in order to cause a cementing. Since a layer height of 50000 m corresponds to this pressure, it is impossible that the sandstones formed alone with pressure. With the metals cementing is based on the ability show also in firm solution and diffusion features. Metals is dissolve mutually it can be combined also in the firm like copper with tin and copper with zinc. On the other hand it does not let itself weld together with zinc with pressure, mix also in the melted lead and zinc (perfectly). The more firmly, the less volatile and a material is less fusible, all the lets is with pressure weld together itself. It shows up with diamond, corundum, quartz and other materials. Without pressure, only by bare laying of smooth surfaces on top of each other such metals, are with each other mixable, can be combined at higher temperature. Two pieces applies mainly for the same metal; with platinum, gold and copper, with the temperature test of 1600 and 1800° the lower melting point was appropriate, just like with such, with those the melting point only for 200° is higher than the test temperature. Also copper and zinc chop lower these conditions together, as a layer brass form 1/4 mm of thickness, also during zinc and lead, zinc and bismuth do not unite. The fact that the solid materials of lower pressure in each other diffuses the results also from the experiments with barium carbonate and sodium sulfate and Barium sulfate and sodium carbonate which from both sides without presence of a solvent with lower pressure became the same equilibrium reached. Chemical reactions in the firm capability of the lower pressure however only then take place, when the volume are not increased. Where by the reaction with Volume decrease is caused, the reaction lower pressure can occur as with mixtures of silver with sulfur with large mobility of the molecules; it does not have to occur however, if the mobility is missing, which with mixtures of zinc and sulfur the case is, although the formation will take place from sulfur zinc also with lower contraction. With agreement a volume distinction occurs, with pressure the coalescence be never caused. with pressure a cleavage is on the contrary often caused with the hydrate of the sulfur arsenic and with the calcium copper acetate. Also transformations of a modification into another, of prism sulfur in octahedral, of graphite in diamond are caused with pressure, and thereby a decreasing of volume occurs. The experiments over the influence of the pressure on firm body did not offer the possibility, the formation of the sedimentary rocks of interpreting in particular the sandstones and conglomerates because quartz does not become plastic and weldable. If however water present with pressure and the formation of a liquid solution is often favored, which works then cementing. In the sandstones and conglomerates consists the binder of amorphously aqueous silicic acid. The author knows by the behavior of these, in particular the younger rocks against caustic potash solution after, by which the amorphous silicic acid is not the quartz grains are dissolved, so that the rock disintegrated. A solution of silicic acid in water can develop with pressure. If one soaks the volume with a colloidal solution of silicic acid, then occurs no caking, because with the drying up, the amorphous silicic acid contracts itself and view the surfaces which can be cemented replaces. One must press evenly as when gluing the wood into pieces together which can be cemented loosely, so that it shrinks with the drying up in the measure like the binder, advances and the relief of that to prevent cementing surfaces. That is caused with the formation of the sandstones with the low pressure of the lay-over sand masses. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSur l'illumination de quelques verres
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de la Classe des Sciences. Académie Royale de Belgique (1900), (12), 1014-1027

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See detailSur la floculation des milieux troubles
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique. 2e série (1900), XIX

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1900), 19, 204-35 ; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). This paper commences ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1900), 19, 204-35 ; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). This paper commences with an historical summary of the researches of previous observers on liquids rendered turbid by the presence of solid substances in a minute state of division (pseudo-solutions), and a bibliography of the subject is given in an appendix. Details are then given of the author's own experiments, the results of which are summarised as follows. Solutions of salts which, which like those of polyvalent metals, cannot be obtained in an optically transparent condition (Abstr., 1899, ii, 537) bring about the flocculation of turbid liquids much more readily than solutions of any other salts. This result is due partly to the agglutinative power of the metallic hydroxides formed by the hydrolysing action of the water, and partly to the flocculating action of the acids simultaneously produced. The extent of the flocculation caused by hydroxides is closely connected with their chemical and physical character as well as with the nature of the turbidity. The behaviour of the turbidity towards salt solutions somewhat resembles that of a membrane, the acid formed by the hydrolysis of the salt traversing the liquid by diffusion whilst the metallic hydroxide is precipitated with the substance causing the turbidity. The persistence of very fine turbidities bears a relation to the Brownian motion. In consequence of this motion, particles suspended in pure water frequently collide with one another without coming into actual contact, but if an electrolyte is present the particles agglutinate, the Brownian motion ceases, and the flocks formed are deposited. The flocculation of liquids is not brought about by electrical action at a distance, as by Rontgen rays or the electricity developed by a statical machine or an induction coil, and cannot therefore be compared with the precipitation of dust particles in air. The feeblest electric current is, however, sufficient to induce clarification, which in the majority of cases commences at the cathode. Electrolytes of the same conductivity but having different anions and cations influence the flocculation very unequally. Electrolytes having the same cation induce flocculation in equal times, whilst the nature of the anion plays only a secondary part. The rate of flocculation in different electrolytes having the same anion is exactly in the order of the velocities of the cations in electrolysis. It therefore appears that the primary cause of the flocculation brought about by electrolytes is to be sought in the velocities of the ions. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSur l'illumination de quelques verres
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique (1900), XIX

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1900), 19, 339-49; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Ruby-glass is made by the ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1900), 19, 339-49; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Ruby-glass is made by the addition of traces of gold chloride to an ordinary fused glass; the glass so obtained is at first colourless and only assumes a ruby colour during subsequent prolonged heating. When an intensely luminous electric beam is passed tangentially through a small cylinder of the colourless gold-glass, practically no internal illumination is visible; in the case of the ruby-glass, however, a yellowish-brown, luminous trace is produced, probably due to reflection from minute particles of metallic gold. The intensity of colour of the ruby-glass depends on the time of its reheating, and determines the intensity of illumination necessary to produce a visible trace; the deeper the colour of the glass the less illumination is required. In the colourless glass, the gold probably exists in a state of extreme subdivision, and the reheating which produces the ruby colour brings about a coarser colloidal aggregation, similar to that which takes place in gelatino-bromide plates during maturation (de Bruyn, Rec. Trav. Chim., 1900, 19, 236). Red glass coloured by copper, and yellow glass coloured by silver, show respectively dull brown and greyish luminous traces, due to the finely divided metals. Glasses coloured by silicates of iron, chromium, manganese, and cobalt show only a faint luminous trace, and, allowing for the presence of small air bubbles, are optically "void" (vide). Glasses which are colourless of themselves show a faint bluish trace and are yellow when viewed through a great length; they thus resemble media containing an extremely minute turbidity (compare Abstr., 1899, ii, 537, 585). Glass decolorised by manganese compounds shows an intensely green fluorescence, the luminous trace being green when the incident light is either violet or blue, but suppressed when it is green, yellow, or red. Glasses containing iron alone or manganese alone are not fluorescent. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailL'inscription dédicatoire de l'église de Waha
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

in Bulletin de la Commission Royale d'Histoire (1900), X, 3(5e série), 29

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See detailGeschichte der Areler Kirche
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

in Deutsch-Belgien : Organ des deutschen Vereins zur Hebung und Pflege der Muttersprache im deutschredenden Belgien (1900), II

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See detailLa civilisation à l'époque mérovingienne
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

in Revue des Questions Historiques (1900), LXVIII

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See detailL'Église aux tournants de l'histoire
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

Book published by Société belge de librairie (1900)

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See detailLes études franques
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

in Société bibliographique (France) (Ed.) Congrès bibliographique international : compte rendu des travaux (1900)

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See detailNote bibliographique sur le tome III de l'ouvrage de M. J.-P. Waltzing : Étude historique sur les corporations professionnelles chez les Romains
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

in Bulletin de la Classe des Lettres et des Sciences Morales et Politiques (1900)

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See detailRapport sur la publication d'un inventaire des actes des collégiales liégeoises
Kurth, Godefroid ULg; Bormans, Stanislas

in Bulletin de la Classe des Lettres et des Sciences Morales et Politiques (1900), X(5e série), -

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See detailLes maladies microbiennes (suite et fin)
Masius, Voltaire ULg

Speech (1900)

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