References of "1898"
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See detailLe comte Immon
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

in Bulletin de la Classe des Lettres et des Sciences Morales et Politiques (1898), XXXV, 3(3e série),

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See detailSur les matières colorantes à base de fer, des terrains de sédiment et sur l'origine probable des roches rouges
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Archives des Sciences Physiques et Naturelles (1898), VI(4),

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See detailSur la cause de l'absence de coloration de certaines eaux limpides naturelles
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique. 2e série (1898), XVII

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1898), 17, 359-75; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Compare Abstr., 1884, 259 ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1898), 17, 359-75; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Compare Abstr., 1884, 259, and Bull. Acad. roy. Belg., 1886, [iii], 12, 814, and 1897, [iii], 34, 578. Although it is well recognised that pure water is blue when viewed through a thickness greater than 1 metre, the only natural waters which appear blue are those of mountain streams which have their origin in the ice and snow of great altitudes. Berzelius has stated (Jabresbericht, 1830, 9, 207) that the extraordinarily clear water of Lake Wettern, in Sweden, is perfectly colourless when viewed through a thickness of more than 32 feet, and has hence raised objection to the view that pure water is blue. The author has previously shown (loc. cit.) that if water contains one ten-millionth part of its weight of colloidal ferric hydroxide, it no longer appears blue, but green in colour; with quantities greater than this, the colour is yellow or brown. By macerating fragments of a red rock, such as a Devonian schist, during several weeks with frequently renewed hot caustic potash, and subsequently washing with water by repeated decantation, a point is ultimately reached when the red coloring-matter ceases to subside from the washing water, even after standing several months; the particles of suspended ferric oxide (haematite) are no longer visible under a magnifying power of 150 diameters, and probably correspond with the dust of the Devonian epoch. On adding a few drops of this turbid solution to a large volume of pure water, the latter is rendered perfectly clear and colourless when viewed through a thickness of 6 metres. When the proportion of ferric oxide, however, is increased, the water quenches more and more of the transmitted light, until it finally becomes opaque, although appearing red by reflected light. These observations explain the fact that terrestrial waters rarely appear blue. That the waters of Alpine streams are generally blue is probably due to their being entirely free from suspended anhydrous ferric oxide; the cosmic dust with which they are often contaminated consists principally of meteoric iron, which possesses different optical properties from haematite, and is incapable of destroying the natural blue colour of the water. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSur les matières colorantes à base de fer des terrains de sédiment et sur l'origine probable des roches rouges
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique. 2e série (1898), XVII

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1898), 17, 202-21; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Ferruginous rocks can be ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1898), 17, 202-21; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Ferruginous rocks can be divided into four groups, green, ochre-yellow, wine-red, and black. The author attempts to explain the presence of two or more of these in the same strata, for example, in the Devonian series. It is shown that the yellowish-brown rocks do not owe their colour merely to ferric hydroxide as previously supposed, but to a compound of ferric hydroxide with a colourless oxide such as silica, magnesia, lime, or alumina, and as these compounds are much more stable than ferric hydroxide, they retain their colour when dehydrated, only turning brick-red on calcination, and at the same time becoming magnetic; they also resist the action of saline waters better than the simple hydroxide. The green rocks do not owe their colour to a simple ferrous silicate, but to a ferroso-ferric silicate, they are thus a special group of the black rocks coloured by magnetite. Ferric hydroxide, when in a compact form, retains its water only in an atmosphere the humidity of which is equal to its dissociation tension and at not too high a temperature; in a light form, under water, it crystallises and becomes dehydrated. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailNote sur un oxyde de fer tétrahydraté
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas et de la Belgique. 2e série (1898), XVII

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1898), 17, 222-3; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). If the voluminous ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Recueil des Travaux Chimiques des Pays-Bas (1898), 17, 222-3; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). If the voluminous precipitate obtained by the addition of ammonia to a dilute solution of ferric chloride or sulphate is dried spontaneously at the ordinary temperature, a vitreous substance is obtained, which is black in mass but red by transmitted light. It has the composition Fe2O3,4H2O. Placed in a desiccator, it loses water; its sp. gr. = 2.436 at 15°, and it is not decomposed by pressure. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDe l'influence de l'électricité sur la sédimentation des liquides troubles
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l’Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1898), XXXV(6), 780-784

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See detailSur l'origine de la couleur bleue du ciel
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1898), XXXVI(12), 504-518

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See detailSur l'origine de la fissilité des phyllades et des schistes
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1898), XXXV(1), 31-34

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See detailSur la cause de l'absence de coloration de certaines eaux limpides naturelles
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1898), XXXVI(9-10), 266-276

Spring, W. Bulletin de la Classe des Sciences, Academie Royale de Belgique (1898), 38(3), 266-76 ; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010 ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Bulletin de la Classe des Sciences, Academie Royale de Belgique (1898), 38(3), 266-76 ; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Tying to its earlier reports over the role of the iron compounds and the humin substances with the feature of the coloring of water and over the elimination of this substances under influence of sunlight, etc. (Bulletin Acad. roy. Bolgique [3] 34. 578; C. 98. I. 410 and Rec. trav. chim. Pays-Bas 17. 202; C. 98. II. 224) author the cause of the colorlessness many discusses clear waters, about what already Berzelius (Annual Report f. Chemistry 9. 207) expressed its astonishment. Terrestrial water only very rarely will appear blue, since in all ground are traces of hematite, and this the blue color water for our eye compensates. On the other hand the glaciers and the snow of high peaks do not contain hematite, water from high regions throw their blue and therefore can maintain their color. Furthermore the influence of the iron compounds on the coloring water is very differenct, depending on whether they are in the form of their hydrates or anhydrous oxides in the water; into latter trap they step with the Humin or the organic substances water not into reaction, the water more generally continues to appear colorless. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailNote sur un oxyde de fer tétrahydraté
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l’Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1898), XXXV(5), 546-547

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See detailSur les causes de la variété des teintes des eaux naturelles et sur la clarification des liquides par l'électricité
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Société chimique de Belgique (Ed.) Walthère Spring : Oeuvres complètes (1898)

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See detailSur les matières colorantes à base de fer, des terrains de sédiment et sur l'origine probable des roches rouges
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l’Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1898), XXXV(5), 521-545

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See detailLes premiers siècles de l'abbaye de Saint-Hubert
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

in Bulletin de la Commission Royale d'Histoire (1898), VIII, 1(5e série), 7-112

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See detailLa frontière linguistique en Belgique et dans le Nord de la France
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

Book published by Société belge de librairie (1898)

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See detailLa bataille de Vouillé en 507
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

in Revue des Questions Historiques (1898), LXIV

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See detailLe recrutement du corps professoral de l'enseignement moyen de l'État
Kurth, Godefroid ULg

in Revue de l'Instruction Publique en Belgique (1898), t. XLI

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See detailLes maladies microbiennes
Masius, Voltaire ULg

Speech (1898)

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See detailCoagulation du sang
Fredericq, Léon ULg

in Richet, Charles (Ed.) Dictionnaire de physiologie. 003. Tome III (1898)

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See detailVérification de l'existence de la nutation eulérienne dans les latitudes observées à Greenwich, pendant les années 1880-1891
Folie, François ULg

in Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique (1898), 3e série, t. 36(11), 392-398

The theory of the rotational motion of the earth 'crust indicates the presence of the eulerian term beyond the chandlérien term and the annual term. The astronomers thought, this nutation of 304 days ... [more ▼]

The theory of the rotational motion of the earth 'crust indicates the presence of the eulerian term beyond the chandlérien term and the annual term. The astronomers thought, this nutation of 304 days turned into 431 days. The author wanted to ensure, by means of Greenwich's latitudes, that we didn't note the period of 304 days. For him, after works, there are three periods; 304, 365 ad 431 days and the three nutations have approximately the same importance. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbone (oxyde de)
Fredericq, Léon ULg

in Richet, Charles (Ed.) Dictionnaire de physiologie. 003. Tome III (1898)

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