References of "Zorzi, Willy"
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See detailDNA immunisation. New histochemical and morphometric data.
Ehirchiou, D.; Zorzi, Willy ULg; Biemans, R. et al

in European Journal of Histochemistry (2002), 46(3), 215-22

Splenic germinal center reactions were measured during primary response to a plasmidic DNA intramuscular injection. Cardiotoxin-pretreated Balb/c mice were immunized with DNA plasmids encodmg or not the ... [more ▼]

Splenic germinal center reactions were measured during primary response to a plasmidic DNA intramuscular injection. Cardiotoxin-pretreated Balb/c mice were immunized with DNA plasmids encodmg or not the SAG1 protein, a membrane antigen of Toxoplasma gondii. Specific anti-SAG1 antibodies were detected on days 16 and 36 after injection of coding plasmids. The results of ELISAs showed that the SAG1-specific antibodies are of the IgG2a class. Morphometric analyses were done on serial immunostained cryosections of spleen and draining or non-draining lymph nodes. This new approach made it possible to evaluate the chronological changes induced by DNA immunisation in the germinal centres (in number and in size). Significant increases in the number of germinal centres were measured in the spleen and only in draining lymph nodes after plasmid injection, the measured changes of the germinal centers appeared to result from the adjuvant stimulatory effect of the plasmidic DNA since both the coding and the noncoding plasmid DNA induced them. No measurable changes were recorded in the T-dependent zone of lymph organs. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Penicillin Resistance of Enterococcus Faecalis Jh2-2r Results from an Overproduction of the Low-Affinity Penicillin-Binding Protein Pbp4 and Does Not Involve a Psr-Like Gene
Duez, Colette ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg; Sapunaric, Frédéric ULg et al

in Microbiology (2001), 147(Pt 9), 2561-9

A penicillin-resistant mutant, JH2-2r (MIC 75 microg ml(-1)), was isolated from Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2 (MIC 5 microg ml(-1)) by successive passages on plates containing increasing concentrations of ... [more ▼]

A penicillin-resistant mutant, JH2-2r (MIC 75 microg ml(-1)), was isolated from Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2 (MIC 5 microg ml(-1)) by successive passages on plates containing increasing concentrations of benzylpenicillin. A comparison of the penicillin-binding protein (PBP) profiles in the two strains revealed a more intensely labelled PBP4 in JH2-2r. Because the sequences of the JH2-2 and JH2-2r pbp4 genes were strictly identical, even in their promoter regions, this intensive labelling could only be associated with an overproduction of the low-affinity PBP4. No psr gene analogous to that proposed to act as a regulator of PBP5 synthesis in Enterococcus hirae and Enterococcus faecium could be identified in the vicinity of pbp4 in E. faecalis JH2-2 and JH2-2r. However, a psr-like gene distant from pbp4 was identified. The cloning and sequencing of that psr-like gene from both E. faecalis strains indicated that they were identical. It is therefore postulated that the PBP4 overproduction in E. faecalis JH2-2r results from the modification of an as yet unidentified factor. [less ▲]

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See detailTolerance to the Foeto-Placental 'Graft': Ten Ways to Support a Child for Nine Months
Thellin, Olivier ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg et al

in Current Opinion in Immunology (2000), 12(6), 731-7

Tolerance to the foetal 'allograft' has been extensively studied in the past few years, providing interesting new insights. In addition to a potential role for HLA-G, which has been widely discussed ... [more ▼]

Tolerance to the foetal 'allograft' has been extensively studied in the past few years, providing interesting new insights. In addition to a potential role for HLA-G, which has been widely discussed, there are hypotheses suggesting roles for several other molecules or cells: leukemia inhibitory factor and its receptor; indoleamine 2. 3-dioxygenase; the Th1/Th2 balance; suppressor macrophages; hormones such as progesterone or the placental growth hormone; CD95 and its ligand; and, as recently proposed, annexin II. Tolerance of the foetal allograft is probably the consequence of a wide panel of mechanisms that may or may not be pregnancy-specific, that are of major or secondary importance and that may be interconnected. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential Expression of Cellular Prion Protein on Human Blood and Tonsil Lymphocytes
Antoine, Nadine ULg; Cesbron, J. Y.; Coumans, Bernard ULg et al

in Haematologica (2000), 85(5), 475-80

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The expression of cellular prion protein (PrPc) on the surface of peripheral lymphocytes has been previously reported, but little is known about its expression on lymphoid cells ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The expression of cellular prion protein (PrPc) on the surface of peripheral lymphocytes has been previously reported, but little is known about its expression on lymphoid cells from secondary lymph organs. In this report, we compare the surface expression of PrPc on human blood lymphocytes and tonsil lymphocytes. DESIGN AND METHODS: This analysis was performed by cytometry on live lymphocytes isolated from healthy donors or from the tonsils of adults or children. RESULTS: Human peripheral lymphocytes and tonsillar lymphoid cells, but not erythrocytes or granulocytes, express PrPc at their surfaces. Interestingly, we found significantly less PrPc on freshly isolated tonsil lymphocytes, both B and T, than on blood cells. Although tonsil cells bear less PrPc than circulating blood lymphocytes, they are able to express high quantities of PrPc on their surface when placed in culture. However, contrary to previous results, mitogen stimulation does not affect this expression on B- or T-cells. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that the PrPc expression by lymphocytes may be modified by interactions occurring during intratissular migration or during cell-to-cell contacts. Whether PrPc plays a role in intracellular communication at this location, as it does in the nervous system, remains an open question. [less ▲]

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See detailLimited effects of placental and pituitary growth hormone on cytokine expression in vitro
Thellin, Olivier ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg; Devos, Sébastien ULg et al

in European Cytokine Network (2000), 11(3), 452-455

The hypothesis that growth hormone (GH) can affect immune responses in man has been evaluated by monitoring cytokine expression in cultures from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, by enzyme-linked ... [more ▼]

The hypothesis that growth hormone (GH) can affect immune responses in man has been evaluated by monitoring cytokine expression in cultures from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and ribonuclease protection assay, and in tonsillar cells by ELISA. In addition to pituitary GH (GH-N), the placental form (GH-V), differing from pituitary GH by 13 amino acids has also been tested. Only few effects reached statistical significance and were in no case greater than 15%. Pituitary GH slightly reduced IL-5 production and stimulated IFN-gamma production. The latter effect was also observed with prolactin and could thus be induced through the prolactin receptor. It is proposed that GH has no strong effects on the parameters investigated, possibly as a result of redundancy in the cytokine network. Alternatively, effects on leukocytes are mediated by other tissues such as the liver or are clear only in response to stronger challenges. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of Mrna Encoding Alpha1e and Alpha1g Subunit in the Brain of a Rat Model of Absence Epilepsy
de Borman, B.; Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Minet, Arlette ULg et al

in Neuroreport (1999), 10(3), 569-74

Low voltage-activated calcium channels are thought to play a key role in the generation of spike and waves discharges characteristic of absence epilepsy. Therefore, the expression level of mRNA encoding ... [more ▼]

Low voltage-activated calcium channels are thought to play a key role in the generation of spike and waves discharges characteristic of absence epilepsy. Therefore, the expression level of mRNA encoding calcium channel alpha1E and alpha1G subunits was measured in the brain of genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS). Using quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, no difference was found in alpha1G mRNA expression between GAERS and control animals, while a decreased expression of alpha1E was seen in the cerebellum and the brain stem of the GAERS. This phenomenon was not observed in young animals when the epileptic phenotype is not expressed. [less ▲]

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See detailLymphoid cell apoptosis induced by trophoblastic cells: a model of active foeto-placental tolerance
Coumans, Bernard ULg; Thellin, Olivier ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg et al

in Journal of Immunological Methods (1999), 224(1-2), 185-196

To test the hypothesis that CD95-L (Fas-L) present on trophoblastic cells plays a part in establishing foeto-placental tolerance by inducing apoptosis of immune defence cells, we cocultured trophoblasts ... [more ▼]

To test the hypothesis that CD95-L (Fas-L) present on trophoblastic cells plays a part in establishing foeto-placental tolerance by inducing apoptosis of immune defence cells, we cocultured trophoblasts with lymphoid cells and scored the frequency of cell death in these cultures. We prepared human trophoblastic cells from term placentas removed by C-section and placed them in culture for 48 h before introducing the lymphoid cells. We added Jurkat cells, a CD3 + lymphoid cell line, or purified T cells from human blood to the cultured trophoblasts and monitored apoptosis by electron microscopy and flow cytometry after TUNEL or annexin V labelling. The frequency of cell death in the CD3 + cell population was higher when the lymphoid cells were cocultured with trophoblastic cells than when they were cultured alone. This frequency increased with time but was reduced when anti-CD95-L antibodies were added to the culture medium. Cell death was less frequent in the lymphoid cell population when trophoblasts were replaced with human fibroblasts not expressing CD95-L. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailHousekeeping Genes as Internal Standards: Use and Limits
Thellin, Olivier ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg; Lakaye, Bernard ULg et al

in Journal of Biotechnology (1999), 75(2-3), 291-5

Quantitative studies are commonly realised in the biomedical research to compare RNA expression in different experimental or clinical conditions. These quantifications are performed through their ... [more ▼]

Quantitative studies are commonly realised in the biomedical research to compare RNA expression in different experimental or clinical conditions. These quantifications are performed through their comparison to the expression of the housekeeping gene transcripts like glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), albumin, actins, tubulins, cyclophilin, hypoxantine phsophoribosyltransferase (HRPT), L32. 28S, and 18S rRNAs are also used as internal standards. In this paper, it is recalled that the commonly used internal standards can quantitatively vary in response to various factors. Possible variations are illustrated using three experimental examples. Preferred types of internal standards are then proposed for each of these samples and thereafter the general procedure concerning the choice of an internal standard and the way to manage its uses are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailCloning of the Rat Brain Cdna Encoding for the Slc-1 G Protein-Coupled Receptor Reveals the Presence of an Intron in the Gene
Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Minet, Arlette ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (1998), 1401(2), 216-20

In order to isolate new G protein-coupled receptors expressed in the cerebral cortex, a set of degenerate oligonucleotides corresponding to the third and seventh transmembrane segment were synthetized ... [more ▼]

In order to isolate new G protein-coupled receptors expressed in the cerebral cortex, a set of degenerate oligonucleotides corresponding to the third and seventh transmembrane segment were synthetized. Their use in PCR on rat brain cortex mRNA amplified several cDNA fragments. One of them, a 526 bp sequence, encoded for what was at that time an unknown G protein-coupled receptor. An oligonucleotide derived from the sequence was then used as a probe to isolate the receptor cDNA from a rat brain cDNA library. It encodes for a 353aa protein with seven transmembrane segments, three consensus N-glycosylation sites at the amino terminus and several potential phosphorylation sites in the intracellular loops. This protein shares 91% overall identity with a recently cloned human somatostatin-like receptor of 402aa named SLC-1. This suggests that we have cloned the rat orthologue of the human SLC-1. However, the extracellular N-terminus of the human receptor is 49 amino acids longer and shows 50% identity with the rat one. Because the human sequence was deduced from genomic DNA, we suspected the presence of an intron in the gene. This was confirmed by PCR using primers spanning the intron. On the basis of the sequence of a 128 kb fragment of chromosome 22 encompassing the SLC-1 gene, we were able to deduce a corrected amino acids sequence for the human receptor. So both rat and human SLC-1 receptors are 353aa long, with three consensus N-glycosylation sites. They share 96% identity at the amino acid level and are encoded by a gene containing one intron in the coding sequence. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of Growth Hormone Receptors by Lymphocyte Subpopulations in the Human Tonsil
Thellin, Olivier ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg et al

in Developmental Immunology (1998), 6(3-4), 295-304

The ability of human tonsillar lymphoid cells to express growth hormone receptor (hGH-N-R) was analyzed by flow cytometry. FITC-coupled recombinant human growth hormone (hGH-N) was used to reveal the ... [more ▼]

The ability of human tonsillar lymphoid cells to express growth hormone receptor (hGH-N-R) was analyzed by flow cytometry. FITC-coupled recombinant human growth hormone (hGH-N) was used to reveal the receptors, in combination with phenotype markers. Unlike T cells, tonsillar B cells constitutively express the hGH-N receptor. Quiescent cells separated from activated cells by Percoll-gradient centrifugation bear fewer receptors than activated ones. Activated T cells express hGH-N-R, but the typical germinal centre CD4+ CD57+ T cells do not. These latter thus appear not to be fully activated. Inside the lymph follicles, the germinal centre CD38+ B-cell population and the mantle-zone CD39+ B-cell population display similar levels of hGH-N-R expression, but receptor density is lower on dividing dark-zone CD38+ CD10+ B cells. Different lymphoid-cell populations thus differ markedly in their ability to express the growth hormone receptor, in relation notably to their activation status. This highlights the link between the neuroendocrine system and the active immune defense. [less ▲]

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See detailDemonstration of the expression of CD95 ligand transcript and protein in human placenta
Zorzi, Willy ULg; Thellin, Olivier ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg et al

in Placenta (1998), 19(4), 269-277

Tolerance of the fetal allograft enables the human conceptus to implant itself into the maternal uterus and survive and grow there. This tolerance phenomenon remains largely obscure, notably because it ... [more ▼]

Tolerance of the fetal allograft enables the human conceptus to implant itself into the maternal uterus and survive and grow there. This tolerance phenomenon remains largely obscure, notably because it appears to be controlled by multiple mechanisms. CD95 ligand (CD95-L), which can trigger death of CD95-positive cells by apoptosis, may participate in inducing anti-fetus-sensitized CD95-positive T lymphocytes to enter apoptosis. Using immunohistochemistry (first trimester and term placentae), FAGS assays (term placenta) and RT-PCR assays (term placenta), the presence of CD95-L protein and mRNA has been shown in crude placental tissue preparations and isolated placental cells. Among the latter, CD95-L expression was detected in trophoblastic cells, fetal blood cells (mRNA only) and also the Hofbauer macrophages. No CD95-L was detected in fibroblasts or fetal endothelial cells. Thus trophoblastic cells, Hofbauer macrophages, and perhaps also fetal blood cells could form a sequential barrier blocking maternal activated defence cells bearing CD95 molecules. (C) 1998 W. B. Saunders Company Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailSerine-Type D-Ala-D-Ala Peptidases and Penicillin-Binding Proteins
Granier, Benoît; Jamin, Marc; Adam, Maggy et al

in Methods in Enzymology (1994), 244

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See detailAcyltransferase activities of the high-molecular-mass essential penicillin-binding proteins
Adam, Maggy; Damblon, Christian ULg; Jamin, Marc et al

in Biochemical Journal (1991), 279(Part 2), 601-604

The high-molecular-mass penicillin-binding proteins (HMM-PBPs), present in the cytoplasmic membranes of all eubacteria, are involved in important physiological events such as cell elongation, septation or ... [more ▼]

The high-molecular-mass penicillin-binding proteins (HMM-PBPs), present in the cytoplasmic membranes of all eubacteria, are involved in important physiological events such as cell elongation, septation or shape determination. Up to now it has, however, been very difficult or impossible to study the catalytic properties of the HMM-PBPs in vitro. With simple substrates, we could demonstrate that several of these proteins could catalyse the hydrolysis of some thioesters or the transfer of their acyl moiety on the amino group of a suitable acceptor nucleophile. Many of the acyl-donor substrates were hippuric acid or benzoyl-D-alanine derivatives, and their spectroscopic properties enabled a direct monitoring of the enzymic reaction. In their presence, the binding of radioactive penicillin to the PBPs was also inhibited. [less ▲]

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