References of "Weekers, Laurent"
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See detailBELGIAN EXPERIENCE OF DCD KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION
Darius, Tom; Jochmans, Ina; Ledinh, Hieu et al

in Transplant International (2011, September), 24(2), 43-44

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See detailControl of hypertension in renal transplantation : the EPARA study
Gellner, Karen; SAINT-REMY, Annie ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg et al

Conference (2011, June 26)

Blood pressure (BP) is a cardiovascular but also kidney disease risk factor, especially in high risk populations such as kidney transplantated one (KT). Therefore it must be accurately measured. The aim ... [more ▼]

Blood pressure (BP) is a cardiovascular but also kidney disease risk factor, especially in high risk populations such as kidney transplantated one (KT). Therefore it must be accurately measured. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the quality of BP control in such a population followed at the CHU Liège. [less ▲]

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See detailNative vitamin D in dialysis patients : safety and biological effects
WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; Warling, Xavier; Moonen, Martial et al

Conference (2011, June 25)

Native vitamine D (VTD) supplementation is recommended by the last KDIGO guidelines in CKD patients including dialysis patients. However, this recommendation is based on a low level of evidence. We ... [more ▼]

Native vitamine D (VTD) supplementation is recommended by the last KDIGO guidelines in CKD patients including dialysis patients. However, this recommendation is based on a low level of evidence. We designed a randomized double-blind prospective study comparing the effects of VTD and placebo in dialysis patients on mortality, vascular calcifications and different paremeters: 25-OH vitamine D- 25(OH)D -, parathormone (PTH), calcium and phosphorus. [less ▲]

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See detailDCD kidney transplantation from 2000 to 2009: a Belgian review
Darius, T.; Ledinh, H.; Monbaliu, D. et al

Conference (2011, March 24)

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See detailContribution of donors after cardiac death to the deceased donor pool: 2002 to 2009 university of liege experience.
Ledinh, H.; Meurisse, Nicolas ULg; Delbouille, Michèle ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2010), 42(10), 4369-72

OBJECTIVE: In this study, we have evaluated the organ procurement and transplantation activity from donors after cardiac death (DCD) at our institution over an 8-year period. Our aim was to determine ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: In this study, we have evaluated the organ procurement and transplantation activity from donors after cardiac death (DCD) at our institution over an 8-year period. Our aim was to determine whether this program influenced transplantation programs, or donation after brain death (DBD) activity. METHODS: We prospectively collected our procurement and transplantation statistics in a database for retrospective review. RESULTS: We observed an increasing trend in potential and actual DCD number. The mean conversion rate turning potential into effective donors was 58.1%. DCD accounted for 16.6% of the deceased donor (DD) pool over 8 years. The mean age for effective DCD donors was 53.9 years (range, 3-79). Among the effective donors, 63.3% (n = 31) came from the transplant center and 36.7% (n = 18) were referred from collaborative hospitals. All donors were Maastricht III category. The number of kidney and liver transplants using DCD sources tended to increase. DCD kidney transplants represented 10.8% of the DD kidney pool and DCD liver transplants made up 13.9% of the DD liver pool over 8 years. The DBD program activity increased in the same time period. In 2009, 17 DCD and 33 DBD procurements were performed in a region with a little >1 million inhabitants. CONCLUSION: The establishment of a DCD program in our institution enlarged the donor pool and did not compromise the development of the DBD program. In our experience, DCD are a valuable source for abdominal organ transplantation. [less ▲]

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See detailControl of hypertension in a kidney transplanted population : the EPARA study
Gellner, Karen; Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; Weekers, Laurent ULg et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (2010, November 27), 66(1), 79

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See detailControl of hypertension in a kidney transplanted population : the EPARA study”.
Gellner, Karen ULg; Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; Weekers, Laurent ULg et al

Scientific conference (2010, November 27)

The prevalence of hypertension in this specific KT population remains high in spite of different antiHTA drugs use and the well known deleterious effect of HTA on kidney function and cardiovascular risk ... [more ▼]

The prevalence of hypertension in this specific KT population remains high in spite of different antiHTA drugs use and the well known deleterious effect of HTA on kidney function and cardiovascular risk. Home BP (and/or ABPM) should thus be recommended to identify this situation and secondary to adapt the treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailQuels paramètres cliniques et biologiques peuvent être considérés comme prédictifs des calcifications vasculaires chez le patient hémodialysé?
Delanaye, Pierre ULg; Warling, X.; Moonen, M. et al

in Néphrologie & Thérapeutique (2010, September), 6(5), 296

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See detailResults of kidney transplantation from donors after cardiac death.
Ledinh, H.; Bonvoisin, Catherine ULg; Weekers, Laurent ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2010), 42(7), 2407-14

Confronting the organ donor shortage, many transplant centers around the world increasingly use donors after cardiac death (DCD). Over the past 20 years, follow-up studies in kidney recipients comparing ... [more ▼]

Confronting the organ donor shortage, many transplant centers around the world increasingly use donors after cardiac death (DCD). Over the past 20 years, follow-up studies in kidney recipients comparing DCD and donors after brain death (DBD) have shown comparable long-term graft function and survival. As a consequence, DCD programs should be continued and expanded, for these donors constitute a potential solution to the imbalance between the numbers of end-stage kidney disease patients on waiting lists versus available kidney grafts. DCD kidneys do not necessarily signify suboptimal grafts; they may merit to be allocated the same as DBD grafts. [less ▲]

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See detailL'observance thérapeutique en transplantation d'organe - L'exemple de la greffe de rein
Milicevic, Martina ULg; Grosch, Stéphanie ULg; Weekers, Laurent ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2010), 65(5-6), 386-390

A successful transplantation implies that immunosuppressive drugs will have to be taken during the whole patient’s life. Poor drug compliance is a multifactorial problem, that is particularly dangerous in ... [more ▼]

A successful transplantation implies that immunosuppressive drugs will have to be taken during the whole patient’s life. Poor drug compliance is a multifactorial problem, that is particularly dangerous in organ transplantation as it can lead to loss of graft function and return to dialysis treatment. The medical doctor must stimulate the patient’s adherence to the strict therapeutic drug protocol. The patient must also be reminded at each medical consultation of the importance of such rigorous drug intake. This bad (or non) compliance is particularly well demonstrated a long time after transplantation. The medical staff, all the health participants, but also the family members must continuously fight against non compliance, which is inherent to any chronic disease. [less ▲]

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See detailLa transplantation pancréatique isolée : le retour à l'activité physqiue
Malaise, Jacques; Dabe, Alain; Hermant, Christophe et al

Conference (2009, October 10)

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See detailA Retrospective Monocenter Review of Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation.
Decker, Emmanuel ULg; Coimbra, C.; Weekers, Laurent ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2009), 41(8), 3389-3392

OBJECTIVE: Herein we have reviewed a consecutive series of simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplantations performed at our institution over a 6-year period. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study population ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Herein we have reviewed a consecutive series of simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplantations performed at our institution over a 6-year period. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study population included 22 patients (15 males and 7 females) who underwent SPK transplantation between 2001 and 2007. The mean recipient age was 47 years (range, 26-63 years). Eighteen patients suffered type 1 and 4 type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mean donor age was 33 years (range, 14-56 years). The mean HLA match was 2.1 (range, 1-5). Immunosuppressive treatment consisted of basiliximab induction followed by tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. RESULTS: The mean hospital stay was 20 days (range, 11-52 days). After a mean follow-up of 44 months (range, 17-88 months), patient, kidney, and pancreas graft survivals were 86%, 82%, and 73%, respectively. Two patients died in the immediate postoperative period due to, respectively, disseminated intravascular coagulation and pulmonary embolism. A kidney graft was lost due to early hyperacute rejection. Other early complications associated with the pancreas graft included 2 cases of immediate reperfusion defects that led to early vascular thrombosis in 1 patient and a duodenal graft fistula in the other patient; a third patient developed type 2 diabetes mellitus. Beyond the postoperative period, graft loss was limited to 1 case of noncompliance to the immunosuppressive medications and 1 death secondary to pulmonary infection with a functional allograft after 4 years. CONCLUSIONS: SPK transplantation is a valid therapeutic option for patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and renal failure due to diabetic nephropathy. The main complications of SPK transplantation occur in the immediate postoperative period consequent to vascular or rejection processes. [less ▲]

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See detailLes anticorps monoclonaux en transplantation rénale
Bonvoisin, Catherine ULg; Weekers, Laurent ULg; Grosch, Stéphanie ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2009), 64(5-6), 287-292

Renal transplantation is the best treatment for end-stage renal disease, but requires efficient immunosuppressive therapy. The latter has evolved over recent years with the development of more powerful ... [more ▼]

Renal transplantation is the best treatment for end-stage renal disease, but requires efficient immunosuppressive therapy. The latter has evolved over recent years with the development of more powerful drugs and of monoclonal antibodies with very specific target. The first monoclonal antibodies, acting against the interleukin 2 receptor, named basiliximab and daclizumab, have showed an excellent tolerance profile and efficacy to reduce acute graft rejection. However, in spite of these properties, the development of delayed graft function or the graft and patient survivals at 1 year were not modified by the use of such specific treatment. One potential advantage could yet be a decreasing need for corticosteroids and sometimes calcineurin inhibitors which could provide some long term benefits for the renal graft, but also the patient. Alemtuzumab, another monoclonal antibody, aimed at the membrane glycoprotein CD52, can also decrease the incidence of acute rejection and the depth of the required immunosuppressive therapy. Other antibodies are still in development with some interesting preliminary results which however demand confirmation in larger studies. [less ▲]

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See detailPolyomavirus in Renal Transplantation: A Hot Problem
Bonvoisin, Catherine ULg; Weekers, Laurent ULg; Xhignesse, Patricia ULg et al

in Transplantation (2008), 85(7S), 42-48

Polyomavirus BK has emerged as an important complication after kidney transplantation. Although, BK nephropathy develops in only1%to5%of renal transplant recipients, its prognosis when present is very ... [more ▼]

Polyomavirus BK has emerged as an important complication after kidney transplantation. Although, BK nephropathy develops in only1%to5%of renal transplant recipients, its prognosis when present is very poor. The most accepted risk factor is the level of immunosuppressive treatment, but the serostatus of donor and recipient and the absence of human leukocyte antigen C7 in donor and/or recipient influence the BK virus (BKV) reactivation. The gold standard in diagnosing BKV nephropathy (BKVN) continues to be biopsy with use of immunohistochemistry for large T antigens. Urinary decoy cells and blood BKV DNA polymerase chain reaction are used in the screening, but their positive predictive values are poor. However, their use as predictors of the evolution of BKVN is more valuable. The reduction of immunosuppressive therapy currently represents the first-line treatment for BKVN. Cidofovir and leflunomide can be used when BKVN continues to progress. In the event of graft loss, retransplantation is possible with a low risk of recurrence when the infection is no longer active. [less ▲]

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See detailACE I/D polymorphism predicts end stage renal disease and or mortality in type I diabetic patients except for those with already advanced nephropathy: the follow up of the Genesis/Genediab Studies
Fysekidis, M.; Hadjadj, S.; Roussel, R. et al

in Diabetologia (2007, September), 50(Suppl. 1), 157-158

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See detailDiarrhea induced by high doses of nicotinamide in dialysis patients
Delanaye, Pierre ULg; Weekers, Laurent ULg; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie ULg

in Kidney International (2006), 69(10), 1914-1914

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See detailEffets de la duree du diabete de type 1 sur la pression arterielle pulse: etude transversale controlee.
Philips, Jean-Christophe ULg; Marchand, Monique ULg; Weekers, Laurent ULg et al

in Archives des Maladies du Coeur et des Vaisseaux (2006), 99(7-8), 683-6

Diabetes mellitus and arterial pulse pressure (PP) are two independent cardiovascular risk factors. This cross-sectional study investigated the influence of diabetes duration on PP in type 1 diabetic ... [more ▼]

Diabetes mellitus and arterial pulse pressure (PP) are two independent cardiovascular risk factors. This cross-sectional study investigated the influence of diabetes duration on PP in type 1 diabetic patients without any cardiovascular disease. PP was measured continuously during 3 minutes (active orthostatic test: 1 min standing--1 min squatting--1 min standing) using a fingertip plethysmograph (Finapres) in 159 type 1 diabetic patients aged 20-60 yrs. They were divided into 4 groups according to diabetes duration: (1) G1 : <10 yrs (n=39); G2: 11-20 yrs (n=45); G3: 21-30 yrs (n=57); and G4: >30 yrs (n=18). In order to separate the effects of age from the effects of diabetes duration, diabetic patients were compared to age- and sex-matched non diabetic controls. PP (expressed in mmHg; mean +/- SD) was higher in men than in women in both diabetic (58 +/- 15 vs. 50 +/- 14; p = 0.001) and non diabetic subjects (55 +/- 14 vs. 47 +/- 12; p = 0.001). Overall PP was higher in diabetic than in non diabetic individuals (54 +/- 15 vs. 50 +/- 13; p = 0.025). PP progressively increased according to diabetes duration: 47 +/- 16 vs. 51 +/- 13 vs. 59 +/- 14 vs. 62 +/- 12, from G1 to G4 respectively; p < 0.0001. Such an increase was not observed in age-matched non diabetic subjects: 50 +/- 11 vs. 52 +/- 12 vs. 49 +/- 14 vs. 52 +/- 18, from G1 to G4, respectively; NS. PP was higher in squatting than in standing position in non diabetic subjects (52 +/- 16 vs. 47 +/- 13; p < 0.0001) and even more in diabetic patients (59 +/- 17 vs. 50 +/- 14; p < 0.0001). Overall, PP difference between diabetic and non diabetic individuals was not significant in standing position (50 +/- 14 vs. 47 +/- 13; NS) although it became highly significant in squatting position (59 +/- 17 vs. 52 +/- 16; p = 0.0005). The squatting-standing difference in PP markedly increased with diabetes duration: 69 +/- 14 during squatting vs. 50 +/- 18 during standing in G4 compared to respectively 50 +/- 17 vs. 44 +/- 15 in G1 diabetic patients. Finally, PP was similar (NS) in diabetic patients with HbA1c < 8% (54 +/- 14) or > or =8% (55 +/- 16), with (57 +/- 17) or without (54 +/- 14) microalbuminuria, treated (56 +/- 14) or not (54 +/- 15) by inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system. In conclusion, PP progressively increased with the duration of type 1 diabetes, independently of age. Such increase was more marked in squatting than in standing position. The role of such PP rise in the increased cardiovascular risk of patients with type 1 diabetes, although suspected in the recent EURODIAB Prospective Complications Study, deserves further investigation. [less ▲]

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See detailModulation of the renal response to ACE inhibition by ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism during hyperglycemia in normotensive, normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic patients
Weekers, Laurent ULg; Bouhanick, B.; Hadjadj, S. et al

in Diabetes (2005), 54(10), 2961-2967

ACE inhibition protects kidney function, but ACE insertion/ deletion (LID) polymorphism affects renal prognosis in type 1 diabetic patients'. ACE genotype may influence the renal benefits of ACE ... [more ▼]

ACE inhibition protects kidney function, but ACE insertion/ deletion (LID) polymorphism affects renal prognosis in type 1 diabetic patients'. ACE genotype may influence the renal benefits of ACE inhibition. We studied the impact of ACE 1/D polymorphism on the renal hemodynamic changes induced by ACE inhibition in type 1 diabetes. We studied renal hemodynamics (glomerular filtration rate [GFR], effective renal plasma flow [ERPF], filtration fraction [GFR/ERPF], mean arterial pressure [MAP], and total renal resistances [MAP/ ERPF]) repeatedly during normoglycemia, and then hyperglycemia in 12 normotensive, normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetes and the 11 genotype (associated with nephrorotection) versus 22 age- and sex-matched subjects with the ACE D allele after three randomly allocated 2- to 6-week periods on placebo, 1.25 mg/day ramipril, and 5.mg/day ramipril in A double-blind, cross-over study. During normoglycemia, the hemodynamic changes induced by ramipril were similar in both genotypes. During hyperglycemia, the changes induced by ramipril were accentuated in the 11 genotype group and attenuated dose dependently in the D allele group (treatment-genotype interaction P values for ERPF, 0.018; MAP 0.018; and total renal resistances, 0.0.55). These results provide a basis to. different renal responses to ACE inbibition according to ACE genotype in type 1 diabetes. [less ▲]

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