References of "Thoreau, François"
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See detailVisualiser à l'échelle du nanomètre
Thoreau, François ULg

in Revue Nouvelle (2011), 66(11), 54-65

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See detailLa normalisation des nanotechnologies
Thoreau, François ULg

in Revue de la Faculté de Droit de l'Université de Liège (2011), (3-4), 427-444

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See detailPourquoi les "nanotechnologies" sont-elles importantes?
Thoreau, François ULg

Conference (2011, September 22)

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See detail"One to rule them all"? The standardisation of nanotechnologies
Thoreau, François ULg

in European Journal of Risk Regulation (2011), 3

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See detailPandémie A(H1N1) et gestion des risques : la responsabilité grippée ?
Chenevière, Cédric; Thoreau, François ULg

in Vergès, Etienne (Ed.) Droit, sciences et techniques: quelles responsabilités? (2011)

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See detailResponsible innovation and nanotechnologies
Thoreau, François ULg

Conference (2011, April 04)

Dès le départ, le développement des nanotechnologies a été fortement soutenu par les pouvoirs publics et marqué par une vision particulière du futur de nos sociétés occidentales. C'est notamment pour ... [more ▼]

Dès le départ, le développement des nanotechnologies a été fortement soutenu par les pouvoirs publics et marqué par une vision particulière du futur de nos sociétés occidentales. C'est notamment pour cette raison que les sciences humaines et sociales (SHS) ont été conviées à participer à la réflexion autour des nanotechnologies, dans le cadre plus général (et concomitant) de l'innovation responsable. Que ce soit aux États-Unis ou en Europe, cette évolution s'est traduite par des tentatives de mobiliser les savoirs produits en SHS, et des les rendre "opérationnels" directement au coeur des processus d'innovation, de recherche et développement. Cette démarche d'"intégration", selon la dénomination consacrée, entend briser les barrières disciplinaires. Nous abordons l'un de ces programmes de recherche spécifique, auquel nous avons collaboré, et en tirons les conclusions provisoires ainsi que quelques conséquences. [less ▲]

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See detailLe fantasme Facebook : n’est pas révolutionnaire qui veut !
Thoreau, François ULg

Article for general public (2011)

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See detailEmbedding ‘‘Science and Society’’ within Nanotechnologies’ Development
Thoreau, François ULg

Conference (2011, March 18)

These slides introduce nanotechnology as a voluntarist public policy. It addresses the societal dimensions of such policies, that is its social, ethical and legal aspects. It then focuses on one ... [more ▼]

These slides introduce nanotechnology as a voluntarist public policy. It addresses the societal dimensions of such policies, that is its social, ethical and legal aspects. It then focuses on one particular research project which aims at integrating such concerns into practices of research and development. Then, it raises issues, questions and ambiguities as for the role of social scientists in such a process. [less ▲]

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See detailComment Facebook a changé le Monde? Le rôle des réseaux sociaux dans les révolutions arabes
Thoreau, François ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2011)

La conférence propose une analyse raisonnée du rôle précis des réseaux sociaux dans les premières révolutions arabes, particulièrement en Tunisie et en Egypte. Elle conclut à une approche critique du ... [more ▼]

La conférence propose une analyse raisonnée du rôle précis des réseaux sociaux dans les premières révolutions arabes, particulièrement en Tunisie et en Egypte. Elle conclut à une approche critique du discours médiatique sur la question, qui propose une vision à la fois linéaire et totalement surévaluée de l'importance de ces technologies dans la genèse du mouvement social. [less ▲]

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See detailLaurent (Brice), Les politiques des nanotechnologies. Pour un traitement démocratique d’une science émergente
Thoreau, François ULg

in Politix : Revue des Sciences Sociales du Politique (2011), 2011/4(96), 187-190

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See detailOn Reflections and Reflexivity: Unpacking Research Dispositifs
Thoreau, François ULg

in Zülsdorf, Torben; Coenen, Christopher; Ferrari, Arianna (Eds.) et al Quantum Engagements: Social Reflections of Nanoscience and Emerging Technologies (2011)

Abstract. Science and Technology Studies (STS) scholars increasingly engage with science and technology (S&T) practitioners, scientists, engineers, and the like. The actual dynamics of these engagements ... [more ▼]

Abstract. Science and Technology Studies (STS) scholars increasingly engage with science and technology (S&T) practitioners, scientists, engineers, and the like. The actual dynamics of these engagements differ from one project, framework or school to the next. However, to be reflexive, such engagements need at some point to deal with the ambiguous relationship between ‘engager’ and ‘engaged’. In an attempt to disambiguate these interactive ties, this chapter takes inspiration from Vinciane Despret, a philosopher of science who has provided ethnographic studies of ethologists. It specifically draws on two of Despret’s arguments about experiments on animals, more precisely rats, and the paradoxical relationships to which they give rise. By means of analogy, it then illustrates the similar ways in which we, as STS scholars, might happen to frame our interactions with S&T practitioners. It argues that any experimental research dispositif necessarily implies a specific relationship dynamic with whoever is engaged. This should not be considered as an obstacle, but instead an opportunity for learning—yet only if the dispositif is open to protest. The analysis here took shape during an engagement study conducted at a large-scale R&D center in Flanders, Belgium. It is informed by ongoing involvement in a broader research project (STIR) that aims at fostering reflexivity among S&T practitioners. [less ▲]

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See detailLe financement public des cultes et de la laïcité en Belgique. Quelles évolutions pour le pluralisme philosophique?
Thoreau, François ULg

Book published by Éditions Universitaires Européennes (2010)

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See detail"Taming the publication machine", or Discourse Analysis made Subliminal
Thoreau, François ULg

Conference (2010, November 15)

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See detailOn Reflections and Reflexiveness: Positioning the Self, Enframing the Other?
Thoreau, François ULg

Conference (2010, October 01)

STS scholars are increasingly engaged with science and technology practitioners, scientists, engineers and the like. The actual dynamics of these engagements differ from one project, framework or school ... [more ▼]

STS scholars are increasingly engaged with science and technology practitioners, scientists, engineers and the like. The actual dynamics of these engagements differ from one project, framework or school to the next. However, to be reflexive, such engagements exercises need to deal at some point with the ambiguous ethical relationships between engager and engaged. In an attempt to disambiguate some of these interactive ties, we begin by considering the respective agendas of involved participants. To do so, we draw upon Despret’s perspectives about experiments on animals and the paradoxical relationships they give rise to. We identify the implied injunctions among STS scholars not only to "be reflexive" but also to reflect back onto practitioners their own worldviews. We then consider some of the ethical tensions, ambiguities and paradoxes between and emerging out of reflexive engagements of the self and of the other. Particularly, we explore to what extent reflexive engagements constitute ends in themselves or means to other ends. We ground this analysis in empirical evidence from an engagement study conducted in a large-scale R&D center in Flanders, Belgium. [less ▲]

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See detailOpening the black box : agencies as socio-technical networks
Fallon, Catherine ULg; Thoreau, François ULg; Joris, Geoffrey ULg

Conference (2010, September 09)

Agencies have historically developed in Belgium, endorsing public activities not only at the federal level, but also at the level of decentralised governments (regions and communities). The current ... [more ▼]

Agencies have historically developed in Belgium, endorsing public activities not only at the federal level, but also at the level of decentralised governments (regions and communities). The current landscape in the Southern part of the county is more and more taking the form of a mosaic with very little efforts in terms of cooperation : this is particularly true when the agencies addressing similar target groups in a given sector are responding to different levels of governments with very little interaction, the coordination being organised by the users' themselves, according to their own strategies. At the same time, some agencies are taking more of a centre stage position : they not only provide services and support to their target group, they also fruitfully contribute to their status and identity building. Using a cultural approach may help study the "art of the state" in its diversity (Hood, 1998). We propose to concentrate the analysis on the emergence of two Agencies whose mission is to support professionals working in the public sector. Based on a recent field work on the transformation of the sector of public research, we will analyse how the FNRS (an agency funding public research) succeeded to survive as an independent agency through since 1928 (Halleux & Xhayet, 2008), adapting to the transforming socio-political context: it emerged as an industry based project and transformed into a "mertonian" institution of knowledge contributing to unify the scientific community at the level of the country, while bypassing the historical divisions of the three worlds of universities in the country (Fallon, 2009). A diachronic analysis helps underline how socially constructed is such an institution, and how the configuration of networks are continuously reshaping themselves to better be embedded in a specific historic society (Laborier, 2003). The FNRS is currently struggling to define new forms of cooperation with the universities (and their researchers) which are themselves embarked in the current stream of transformations introducing techniques derived from New Public Management in research organisations (de Boer, Enders, Schimank, 2007). In quite a different sector, another field work using the same methodological approach analysed the emergence of a very recent agency, EASI-WAL, serving the regional administration in order to encourage administrative simplicity (OCDE, 2003, 2005) and reported the shortcomings of this organisation in organising avenues for professional change with the civil servants (Thoreau, Fallon, Joris,2009). The two field work research were organised as case study analysis, with document analysis, face to face interviews and in situ observation, using research tools derived from the sociology of science (Actor-Network Theory in Callon,1986). The paper will present the outcomes of the analysis of the dynamics of the cooperation between the agency and its target groups (FNRS & researchers; EASI-WAL & civil servants) and their outcomes in terms of innovation and organisational learning. We observe the implementation of two institutions both designed to support the emergence of some common goal within their target collectives (elitist -research; administrative simplicity): they autonomously gave shape to their internal procedures of categorisation and hierarchisation, with identification processes contributing to the definition of institutional boundaries defining a specific field while ensuring its inscription in the network through a specific legitimating strategy (Douglas, 1986). This analysis will unveil some of the mechanisms of cooperation of the different stakeholders supporting the institution, and also the struggle between stakeholders for the definition of settings of participation and administrative and political control. [less ▲]

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