References of "Struman, Ingrid"
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See detailStudy of the role of Sprouty1 in the regulation of angiogenesis
Sabatel, Céline; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Cornet, Anne et al

Poster (2008, March 30)

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See detailAntiangiogenic peptides
Martial, Joseph ULg; Struman, Ingrid ULg; Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg et al

Patent (2008)

The present invention refers to a pharmaceutical composition comprising an isolated antiangiogenic peptide or a recombinant protein comprising the antiangiogenic peptide, wherein the peptide is between 11 ... [more ▼]

The present invention refers to a pharmaceutical composition comprising an isolated antiangiogenic peptide or a recombinant protein comprising the antiangiogenic peptide, wherein the peptide is between 11 and 40 amino acids in length and having antiangiogenic activity, the peptide comprising the amino acid sequence: X1-X2-X3-X4-X5-X6-X7-X8-X9-X10-X11-X12-X13-X14, wherein X1 is any amino acid residue comptabile with forming a helix; X2 is an amino acid redisue of : Leu, Ile, Val; X3 is an amino acid residue of: Arg, Lys, His, Ser, Thr; X4 is an amino acid residue of: Ile, Leu, Val; X5 is any amino acid residue compatible with forming a helix; X6 is an amino acid residue of: Leu, Ile, Val; X7 is an amino acid residue of: Leu, Ile, Val, Ser, Thr; X8 is any amino acid residue compatible with forming a helix; X9 is any amino acid residue compatible with forming a helix; X10 is an amino acid residue of: Gln, Glu, Asp, Arg, His, Lys, Asn; X11 is an amino acid residue of: Ser, Thr; X12 is an amino acid residue of: Trp, Tyr, Phe; X13 is an animo acid residue of Leu, Ile, Val, Asn, Gln; X14 is an amino acid residue of: Glu, Gln, Asp, Asn. [less ▲]

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See detailZebrafish Sox7 and Sox18 function together to control arterial-venous identity
Pendeville-Samain, Hélène ULg; Winandy, Marie ULg; Manfroid, Isabelle ULg et al

in Developmental Biology (2008), 317(2), 405-16

Sox7 and Sox18 are members of the F-subgroup of Sox transcription factors family and are mostly expressed in endothelial compartments. In humans, dominant mutations in Sox18 are the underlying cause of ... [more ▼]

Sox7 and Sox18 are members of the F-subgroup of Sox transcription factors family and are mostly expressed in endothelial compartments. In humans, dominant mutations in Sox18 are the underlying cause of the severe hypotrichosis-lymphedema-telangiectasia disorder characterized by vascular defects. However little is known about which vasculogenic processes Sox7 and Sox18 regulate in vivo. We cloned the orthologs of Sox7 and Sox18 in zebrafish, analysed their expression pattern and performed functional analyses. Both genes are expressed in the lateral plate mesoderm during somitogenesis. At later stages, Sox18 is expressed in all axial vessels whereas Sox7 expression is mainly restricted to the dorsal aorta. Knockdown of Sox7 or Sox18 alone failed to reveal any phenotype. In contrast, blocking the two genes simultaneously led to embryos displaying dysmorphogenesis of the proximal aorta and arteriovenous shunts, all of which can account for the lack of circulation observed in the trunk and tail. Gene expression analyses performed with general endothelial markers on double morphants revealed that Sox7 and Sox18 are dispensable for the initial specification and positioning of the major trunk vessels. However, morphants display ectopic expression of the venous Flt4 marker in the dorsal aorta and a concomitant reduction of the artery-specific markers EphrinB2a and Gridlock. The striking similarities between the phenotype of Sox7/Sox18 morphants and Gridlock mutants strongly suggest that Sox7 and Sox18 control arterial-venous identity by regulating Gridlock expression. [less ▲]

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See detailInhibition of tumor growth and metastasis establishment by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer delivery of the antiangiogenic factor 16K hPRL
Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Cornet, Anne ULg; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

in Molecular Therapy : The Journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy (2007), 15(12), 2094-2100

Tumor metastases, the most fearsome aspect of cancer, are generally resistant to conventional therapies. Angiogenesis is a crucial aspect of tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. Antiangiogenic ... [more ▼]

Tumor metastases, the most fearsome aspect of cancer, are generally resistant to conventional therapies. Angiogenesis is a crucial aspect of tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. Antiangiogenic therapy, therefore, holds potential as an attractive strategy for inhibiting metastasis development. Human 16K PRL (16K hPRL), a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis, has been demonstrated to prevent tumor growth in two xenograft mouse models, but whether it also affects tumor metastasis is unknown. In this study we will investigate the ability of 16K hPRL to prevent the establishment of metastasis. We demonstrate that 16K hPRL administered via adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, inhibits tumor growth by 86% in a subcutaneous (SC) B16-F10 mouse melanoma model. Computer-assisted image analysis shows that 16K hPRL treatment results in a reduction of tumor-vessel length and width, leading to a 57% reduction of average vessel size. In a pre-established tumor model, moreover, 16K hPRL can significantly delay tumor development. Finally, for the first time, we provide evidence that 16K hPRL considerably reduces the establishment of B16-F10 metastasis in an experimental lung metastasis model. Both the number and size of metastases are reduced by 50% in 16K hPRL-treated mice. These results highlight a potential role for 16K hPRL in anticancer therapy for both primary tumors and metastases. [less ▲]

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See detailThe expression of prolactin and its cathepsin D-mediated cleavage in the bovine corpus luteum vary with the estrous cycle
Erdmann, S.; Ricken, A.; Merkwitz, C. et al

in American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism (2007), 293(5), 1365-1377

In the corpus luteum (CL), blood vessels develop, stabilize, and regress. This process depends on the ratio of pro-and antiangiogenic factors, which change during the ovarian cycle. The present study ... [more ▼]

In the corpus luteum (CL), blood vessels develop, stabilize, and regress. This process depends on the ratio of pro-and antiangiogenic factors, which change during the ovarian cycle. The present study focuses on the possible roles of 23,000 (23K) prolactin (PRL) in the bovine CL and its antiangiogenic NH2-terminal fragments after extracellular cleavage by cathepsin D (Cath D). PRL RNA and protein were demonstrated in the CL tissue, in luteal endothelial cells, and in steroidogenic cells. Cath D was detected in CL tissue, cell extracts, and corresponding cell supernatants. In the intact CL, 23K PRL levels decreased gradually, whereas Cath D levels concomitantly increased between early and late luteal stages. In vitro, PRL cleavage occurred in the presence of acidified homogenates of CL tissue, cells, and corresponding cell supernatants. Similar fragments were obtained with purified Cath D, and their appearance was inhibited by pepstatin A. The aspartic protease specific substrate MOCAc-GKPILF similar to FRLK(Dnp)-D-R-NH2 was cleaved by CL cell supernatants, providing further evidence for Cath D activity. The 16,000 PRL inhibited proliferation of luteal endothelial cells accompanied by an increase in cleaved caspase-3. In conclusion, 1) the bovine CL is able to produce PRL and to process it into antiangiogenic fragments by Cath D activity and 2) PRL cleavage might mediate angioregression during luteolysis. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of micro-RNA/gene interactions involved in angiogenesis using machine learning techniques
Huynh-Thu, Vân Anh ULg; Hiard, Samuel ULg; Geurts, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2007, September)

Motivation: Angiogenesis is the process responsible for the growth of new blood vessels from existing ones. It is also associated with the development of cancer, as tumors need to be irrigated by blood ... [more ▼]

Motivation: Angiogenesis is the process responsible for the growth of new blood vessels from existing ones. It is also associated with the development of cancer, as tumors need to be irrigated by blood vessels for growing. New cancer therapies appear that exploit angiogenesis inhibitors, also called angiostatic agents, to asphyxiate and starve the tumors. Better understanding the regulatory mechanisms that control angiogenesis is thus fundamental. Recently, short non-coding RNA molecules, called micro-RNAs, have been discovered that are involved in post- transcriptional regulation of gene expressions. These molecules bind to RNA messengers following the base pairing rules, preventing them from being translated into proteins and/or tagging them for degradation. The main goal of this work is to use computational approaches to identify micro-RNAs involved in angiogenesis. Method: In order to identify genes involved in angiogenesis, bovine endothelial cells were treated by a known angiogenesis inhibitor [1], prolactin 16K, and their gene expression profile was compared to the profile of untreated cells. The genes were then divided into three classes: up-regulated, down-regulated, and unaffected genes. The 3'UTR regions of these genes were then analysed by machine learning techniques. Different approaches were considered. First, we described each gene by a vector of motif counts in their 3'UTR regions and used machine learning techniques to rank the motifs according to their relevance for separating the genes into the different classes. We considered successively motifs corresponding to the seeds of known micro- RNAs and also all possible motifs of a given length. To rank the motifs, we compared ensemble of decision trees and linear support vector machines. Second, we considered an approach called Segment and Combine that was proposed in [2]. Finally, we also carried out an exhaustive search of all motifs of a given length that satisfy some constraints on specificity and coverage with respect to a given gene category. Results: The ability of the different approaches at identifying relevant motifs was first assessed on genes predicted to be the target of some known miRNAs. In this simple setting, most methods were able to identify the micro-RNA seed. The results obtained on the genes regulated by prolactin 16K are also very encouraging. We were able to identify one micro-RNA already known to play a role in angiogenesis and several motifs are predicted by different approaches as very specific of up- or down-regulation by prolactin 16K. Their relationship with known micro-RNAs is certainly worth exploring. Conclusion: Machine learning approaches are promising techniques for the identification of micro-RNA/gene interactions. Future work will concern the application of the same kind of techniques on promoters for the identification of transcription factor binding sites. [less ▲]

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See detailAntiangiogenic peptides
Martial, Joseph ULg; Struman, Ingrid ULg; Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg et al

Patent (2007)

The present invention refers to antiangiogenic peptides, especially to tilted peptides having antiangiogenic properties and peptides from the prolactin/growth hormone familiy having antiangiogenic ... [more ▼]

The present invention refers to antiangiogenic peptides, especially to tilted peptides having antiangiogenic properties and peptides from the prolactin/growth hormone familiy having antiangiogenic properties. [less ▲]

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See detailA cathepsin D-cleaved 16 kDa form of prolactin mediates postpartum cardiomyopathy
Hilfiker-Kleiner, D.; Kaminski, K.; Podewski, E. et al

in Cell (2007), 128(3), 589-600

Postpartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a disease of unknown etiology and exposes women to high risk of mortality after delivery. Here, we show that female mice with a cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of stat3 ... [more ▼]

Postpartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a disease of unknown etiology and exposes women to high risk of mortality after delivery. Here, we show that female mice with a cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of stat3 develop PPCM. In these mice, cardiac cathepsin D (CD) expression and activity is enhanced and associated with the generation of a cleaved antiangiogenic and proapoptotic 16 kDa form of the nursing hormone prolactin. Treatment with bromocriptine, an inhibitior of prolactin secretion, prevents the development of PPCM, whereas forced myocardial generation of 16 kDa prolactin impairs the cardiac capillary network and function, thereby recapitulating the cardiac phenotype of PPCM. Myocardial STAT3 protein levels are reduced and serum levels of activated CD and 16 kDa prolactin are elevated in PPCM patients. Thus, a biologically active derivative of the pregnancy hormone prolactin mediates PPCM, implying that inhibition of prolactin release may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for PPCM. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of the antitumor activity of 16K prolactin
Kinet, Virginie; Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Cornet, Anne ULg et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailRecovery from postpartum cardiomyopathy in 2 patients by blocking prolactin release with bromocriptine
Hilfiker-Kleiner, D.; Meyer, G. P.; Schieffer, E. et al

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2007), 50(24), 2354-5

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See detailThe angiostatic 16K human prolactin overcomes endothelial cell anergy and promotes leukocyte infiltration via nuclear factor-kappaB activation
Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Sabatel, Céline ULg; Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg et al

in Molecular Endocrinology (2007), 21(6), 1422-9

The 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) is a potent angiostatic factor that inhibits tumor growth in mouse models. Using microarray experiments, we have dissected how the endothelial ... [more ▼]

The 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) is a potent angiostatic factor that inhibits tumor growth in mouse models. Using microarray experiments, we have dissected how the endothelial-cell genome responds to 16K hPRL treatment. We found 216 genes that show regulation by 16K hPRL, of which a large proportion turned out to be associated with the process of immunity. 16K hPRL induces expression of various chemokines and endothelial adhesion molecules. These expressions, under the control of nuclear factor-kappaB, result in an enhanced leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction. Furthermore, analysis of B16-F10 tumor tissues reveals a higher expression of adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, or E-selectin) in endothelial cells and a significantly higher number of infiltrated leukocytes within the tumor treated with 16K hPRL compared with the untreated ones. In conclusion, this study describes a new antitumor mechanism of 16K hPRL. Because cellular immunity against tumor cells is a crucial step in therapy, the discovery that treatment with 16K hPRL overcomes tumor-induced anergy may become important for therapeutic perspectives. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular profiling of 16K PRL treated tumours by an antibody-array approach
Cornet, Anne ULg; Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Lion, Michelle ULg et al

Poster (2006, May)

Tumour development is often accompanied by the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature. This new intratumoral blood network is driven by the process of angiogenesis, providing the ... [more ▼]

Tumour development is often accompanied by the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature. This new intratumoral blood network is driven by the process of angiogenesis, providing the essential nutrients for growth, invasion and metastasis. At the present time, it is well established that inhibitors of angiogenesis prevent the growth and progression of tumours, offering a new therapeutic approach for treatment of cancer. Several studies have already showed that the N-terminal fragment of the human prolactin, 16k-Da PRL, has a potent anti-angiogenic activity. Recently, research groups have demonstrated that the 16k-Da PRL inhibits tumour development in animal models. Despite the fact that several studies leading to improve our knowledge of 16k-Da PRL action were performed, little is known about its role played to prevent tumour growth in vivo. In this study, we first tested the ability of the 16k-Da PRL to inhibit the growth of established HCT116 tumours in nude mice, using an adenovirus approach. As expected, we found that the tumour progression was tightly reduced by the expression of the 16k-Da PRL into the tumours. This antitumour activity was also associated with a slight tumour vascularization. To discover biomarkers that contribute in 16k-Da PRL tumour suppressive effects, we used one of the most powerful multiplexed detection techonologies: the antibody-microarray proposed by Eurogentec. These protein-chips allow to identify multiple proteins from small amounts of samples within a single experiment. Three independent sets of antibody array from samples of 16k-Da PRL treated tumours and controls were analysed. Experimental and analysis optimisations were applied to ensure the correct interpretation of the fluorescent signals from the antibody arrays. In addition, significant results were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Our study allowed to identify several proteins which could be implicated in the tumour dormancy induced by 16k-Da PRL treatment. Additional analysis will provide important biological information for discovering of the new cancer biomarkers and their relationship with the 16k-Da PRL effects on cancer development. [less ▲]

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See detailProlactin/growth hormone-derived antiangiogenic peptides highlight a potential role of tilted peptides in angiogenesis
Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Lins, Laurence ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2006), 103(39), 14319-14324

Angiogenesis is a crucial step in many pathologies, including tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we show that tilted peptides exert antiangiogenic activity. Tilted (or oblique-oriented) peptides are short ... [more ▼]

Angiogenesis is a crucial step in many pathologies, including tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we show that tilted peptides exert antiangiogenic activity. Tilted (or oblique-oriented) peptides are short peptides known to destabilize membranes and lipid cores and characterized by an asymmetric distribution of hydrophobic residues along the axis when helical. We have previously shown that 16-kDa fragments of the human prolactin/growth hormone (PRL/GH) family members are potent angiogenesis inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate that all these fragments possess a 14-aa sequence having the characteristics of a tilted peptide. The tilted peptides of human prolactin and human growth hormone induce endothelial cell apoptosis, inhibit endothelial cell proliferation, and inhibit capillary formation both in vitro and in vivo. These antiangiogenic effects are abolished when the peptides' hydrophobicity gradient is altered by mutation. We further demonstrate that the well known tilted peptides of simian immunodeficiency virus gp32 and Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptide are also angiogenesis inhibitors. Taken together, these results point to a potential new role for tilted peptides in regulating angiogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailThe antiangiogenic factor, 16-kDa human prolactin, induces endothelial cell cycle arrest by acting at both the G(0)-G(1) and the G(2)-M phases
Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Cornet, Anne ULg et al

in Molecular Endocrinology (2005), 19(7), 1932-1942

The 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) is a potent antiangiogenic factor that has been shown to prevent tumor growth in a xenograph mouse model. In this paper we first demonstrate ... [more ▼]

The 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) is a potent antiangiogenic factor that has been shown to prevent tumor growth in a xenograph mouse model. In this paper we first demonstrate that 16K hPRL inhibits serum-induced DNA synthesis in adult bovine aortic endothelial cells. This inhibition is associated with cell cycle arrest at both the G(0)-G(1) and the G(2)-M phase. Western blot analysis revealed that 16K hPRL strongly decreases levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1, but not cyclin E. The effect on cyclin D1 is at least partially transcriptional, because treatment with 16K hPRL both reduces the cyclin D1 mRNA level and down-regulates cyclin D1 promoter activity. This regulation may be due to inhibition of the MAPK pathway, but it is independent of the glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta pathway. Lastly, 16K hPRL induces the expression of negative cell cycle regulators, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21(cip1) and p27(kip1). In summary, 16K hPRL inhibits serum-induced proliferation of endothelial cells through combined effects on positive and negative regulators of cell cycle progression. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (14 ULg)