References of "Rabenda, Véronique"
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See detailChanges in Structure and Symptoms in Knee Osteoarthritis and Prediction of Future Knee Replacement Over 8 Years.
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Cooper, Cyrus; Pavelka, Karel et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2013), 93

The objective of this study was to assess the association between changes in joint space width (JSW, i.e., structure) or Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) score (i.e., symptoms) over 3 ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to assess the association between changes in joint space width (JSW, i.e., structure) or Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) score (i.e., symptoms) over 3 years in patients with knee osteoarthritis and the occurrence of knee replacement over 8 years. We followed 133 subjects with primary knee osteoarthritis prospectively for a mean of 8 years. JSW (standard radiography) and symptoms (total WOMAC score) were assessed every year for 3 years. The rate of knee replacement was recorded for the following 5 years. Logistic regressions were performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. After 8 years' follow-up, ten patients (7.5 %) had undergone a knee replacement. The changes in JSW or WOMAC score over 3 years were significantly associated with the occurrence of knee replacement during the following 5 years (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively). Each 0.1-mm narrowing of JSW over 3 years was associated with a 14 % (95 % CI 3-25 %) increased risk for knee replacement. For every 10 % increase in WOMAC score, the risk for joint replacement was increased by 16 % (95 % CI 1-33 %). When JSW and WOMAC score were included in the same statistical model, they were still significantly associated with risk for knee replacement (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively), but JSW change was the only variable that remained significant after adjusting for all potential confounders. Our results suggest that changes in symptoms and, more particularly, in structure over 3 years in patients with osteoarthritis reflect a clinically relevant progression of the disease. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationship between use of antidepressants and risk of fractures: a meta-analysis
Rabenda, Véronique ULg; Nicolet, Delphine ULg; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24

Summary It has been shown that antidepressants would have a direct action on bone metabolism and would be associated with increased fracture risk. Results from this large meta-analysis show that both ... [more ▼]

Summary It has been shown that antidepressants would have a direct action on bone metabolism and would be associated with increased fracture risk. Results from this large meta-analysis show that both SSRIs and TCAs are associated with a moderate and clinically significant increase in the risk of fractures of all types. Introduction This study seeks to investigate the relationship between use of antidepressants and the risk of fracture. Methods An exhaustive systematic research of case–control and cohort studies published or performed between 1966 and April 2011 that reported risk estimates of fracture associated with use of antidepressants was performed using MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Systematic Review Database, manual review of the literature, and congressional abstracts. Inclusion, quality scoring, and data abstraction were performed systematically by three independent reviewers. Results A total of 34 studies (n01,217,464 individuals) were identified. Compared with non-users, the random effects pooled RR of fractures of all types, among antidepressant users, were 1.39 (95%CI 1.32–1.47). Use of antidepressants were associated with a 42 %, 47 %, and 38 % risk increase in non-vertebral, hip, and spine fractures, respectively ([For non-vertebral fractures: RR01.42, 95%CI 1.34–1.51]; [For hip fractures: RR01.47, 95%CI 1.36–1.58]; [For spine fractures: RR01.38, 95%CI 1.19–1.61]). Studies examining SSRI use showed systematically a higher increase in the risk of fractures of all types, non-vertebral, and hip fractures than studies evaluating TCA use. Conclusions Results from this large meta-analysis show that both SSRIs and TCAs are associated with a moderate and clinically significant increase in the risk of fractures of all types. [less ▲]

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See detailPerception, knowledge and use by general practitioners of Belgium of the FRAX tool
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Nicolet, Delphine ULg; Compère, Stéphanie et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2012, June), 71(Suppl.3), 716

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See detailPerception, knowledge and use by general practitioners of Belgium of the FRAX tool
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Nicolet, Delphine ULg; Compère, Stéphanie et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012, March), 23(Suppl. 2), 363-364

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See detailEffect of collagen hydrolysate in articular pain: A 6-month randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Zegels, Brigitte ULg; LEONORI, Lorenzo ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012, March), 23(Suppl. 2), 362-363

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See detailRisk of nonvertebral fractures among elderly postmenopausal women using antidepressants
Rabenda, Véronique ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; REGINSTER, Jean-Yves ULg

in Bone (2012), 51(4), 674-679

Objective: To examine the association between antidepressants, including TCAs, SSRIs, and miscellaneous antidepressants and the risk of nonvertebral fractures among women with osteoporosis. Materials and ... [more ▼]

Objective: To examine the association between antidepressants, including TCAs, SSRIs, and miscellaneous antidepressants and the risk of nonvertebral fractures among women with osteoporosis. Materials and methods: This study was a post-hoc analysis of pooled data from two international, phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind studies (the Spinal Osteoporosis Therapeutic Intervention [SOTI] and TReatment Of Peripheral OSteoporosis [TROPOS]). A nested case-control study was performed in the placebo treated population. Adjusted logistic regression models were used to estimate the risk of nonvertebral fracture associated with the use of antidepressants. Results: After 3. years of follow-up, 391 nonvertebral fractures cases were identified and matched to 1955 controls. Compared with non-users of antidepressants, antidepressants use was associated with an increased risk of nonvertebral fractures (adjusted OR=1.64; 95%CI, 1.03-2.62]). Particularly, there was a 2-fold risk increase (95%CI, 1.07-3.79) of nonvertebral fracture for current users of SSRIs and a 2.1-fold risk increase for subjects who were current users of TCAs (95%CI, 1.02-4.30). Among patients categorized as recent or past users, none of the classes of antidepressants were statistically associated with increased risk of nonvertebral fracture. Conclusions: Our findings confirm that both SSRIs and TCAs increase the risk of nonvertebral fracture in current users. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of collagen hydrolysate in articular pain: A 6-month randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Zegels, Brigitte ULg; Leonori, Lorenzo et al

in Complementary Therapies in Medicine (2012), 20

Objective: Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a food supplement made of collagen hydrolysate 1200 mg/day versus placebo during 6 months, in subjects with joint pain at the lower or upper limbs or at ... [more ▼]

Objective: Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a food supplement made of collagen hydrolysate 1200 mg/day versus placebo during 6 months, in subjects with joint pain at the lower or upper limbs or at the lumbar spine. Design: Comparative double-blind randomized multicenter study in parallel groups. Setting: 200 patients of both genders of at least 50 years old with joint pain assessed as ≥30 mm on a visual analogical scale (VAS). Intervention: Collagen hydrolysate 1200 mg/day or placebo during 6 months. Main outcome measure: Comparison of the percentage of clinical responder between the active collagen hydrolysate group and the placebo group after 6 months of study. A responder subject was defined as a subject experiencing a clinically significant improvement (i.e. by 20% or more) in the most painful joint using the VAS score. All analyses were performed using an intent-totreat procedure. Results: At 6 months, the proportion of clinical responders to the treatment, according to VAS scores, was significantly higher in the collagen hydrolysate (CH) group 51.6%, compared to the placebo group 36.5% (p < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference between groups at 3 months (44.1% vs. 39.6%, p = 0.53). No significant difference in terms of security and tolerability was observed between the two groups. Conclusions: This study suggests that collagen hydrolysate 1200 mg/day could increase the number of clinical responders (i.e. improvement of at least 20% on the VAS) compared to placebo. More studies are needed to confirm the clinical interest of this food supplement. [less ▲]

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See detailAntidepressant medications and osteoporosis
Rizzoli, R; Cooper, C; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in BONE (2012), 51

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See detailThe importance of integrating medication adherence into pharmacoeconomic analyses: the example of osteoporosis.
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Boonen, Annelies; Rabenda, Véronique ULg et al

in Expert Reviews of Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes Research (2012), 12(2), 159-66

Adherence to medications is poor and suboptimal in many chronic diseases. Nonadherence can reduce treatment effectiveness and can have an impact on healthcare costs. As a consequence, it may alter the ... [more ▼]

Adherence to medications is poor and suboptimal in many chronic diseases. Nonadherence can reduce treatment effectiveness and can have an impact on healthcare costs. As a consequence, it may alter the cost-effectiveness of drug therapies. This article emphasizes the importance of integrating medication compliance and persistence into pharmacoeconomic evaluations, using osteoporosis as an example. A limited number of studies carried out to date have suggested important economic implications of poor adherence to osteoporosis medications. Therefore, compliance and persistence should be an integral part of clinical studies and pharmacoeconomic analyses in order to estimate the cost-effectiveness of drug therapies in current community practice. Measuring adherence and incorporating it into health economic modeling may, however, pose particular challenges. [less ▲]

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See detailPartial adherence: a new perspective on health economic assessment in osteoporosis.
Kanis, J. A.; Cooper, C.; Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22(10), 2565-73

Partial adherence in osteoporosis increases the risk for fragility fracture and has considerable impact on cost-effectiveness. This review highlights a number of avenues for further research, such as ... [more ▼]

Partial adherence in osteoporosis increases the risk for fragility fracture and has considerable impact on cost-effectiveness. This review highlights a number of avenues for further research, such as improved definition of thresholds of compliance and persistence, as well as gap length, offset times, and fraction of benefit. INTRODUCTION: A number of economic models have been developed to evaluate osteoporosis therapies and support decisions regarding efficient allocation of health care resources. Adherence to treatment is seldom incorporated in these models, which may reduce their validity for decision-making since adherence is poor in real-world clinical practice. METHODS: An ad hoc working group of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis met to review key issues concerning the incorporation of partial adherence in health economic models. RESULTS: Observational data have shown that poor adherence is associated with an increase in the risk for fragility fracture. Health economic modelling indicates that full adherence is associated with more quality-adjusted life years gained than partial adherence, as well as higher treatment costs and lower fracture-related costs. Although adherence appears as an important driver of cost-effectiveness, the effect is dependent on a range of other variables, such as offset time, fraction of benefit, fracture risk, fracture efficacy, fracture-related costs, and drug cost, some of which are poorly defined. Current models used to evaluate cost-effectiveness in osteoporosis may oversimplify the contributions of compliance and persistence. CONCLUSION: Partial adherence has a significant impact on cost-effectiveness. Further research is required to optimise thresholds of compliance and persistence, the impact of gap length, offset times, and fraction of benefit. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationship between bone mineral density changes and risk of fractures among patients receiving calcium with or without vitamin D supplementation: a meta-regression
Rabenda, Véronique ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22

Surrogate measures of fracture risk, such as effects on bone mineral density, may be of great interest to assess the efficacy of available osteoporosis treatments. Our results suggest that bone mineral ... [more ▼]

Surrogate measures of fracture risk, such as effects on bone mineral density, may be of great interest to assess the efficacy of available osteoporosis treatments. Our results suggest that bone mineral density (BMD) changes cannot be used as a surrogate of anti-fracture efficacy, among patients receiving calcium, with or without vitamin D. Introduction: The purpose of this study is to examine the association between changes in bone mineral density with reduction in the risk of fractures in patients receiving calcium with or without vitamin D. Methods: We selected all randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials of calcium with or without vitamin D supplementation. To be included in this analysis, the studies were required to report both BMD (hip/proximal femur and/or lumbar spine) and the incidence of fractures. Metaregression analyses were used to examine the associations of changes in BMD with reduction in risk of fracture over the duration of each study. The change in BMD was the difference between changes (from baseline) observed in the active treatment group and placebo group. Results: A total of 15 randomized trials (n=47,365) were identified, most of whom (77%) came from the Women’s Health Initiative trial. Results show that larger increases in BMD at the lumbar spine were not associated with greater reduction in fracture risk. Concerning hip BMD changes, we found a statistically significant relationship between hip BMD changes and reduction in risk. However, results were not quite significant after excluding the both largest studies, in which BMD changes were measured in very small subset of patients. These points may have largely biased our results. Conclusions: In conclusion, there was no evidence of a relationship between BMD changes and reduction in risk of fractures among patients receiving calcium with or without vitamin D supplementation. Calcium and/or Vitamin D may reduce fracture rates through a mechanism independent of bone density. [less ▲]

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