References of "Noël, Agnès"
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See detailMicroRNA-146a, a downstream effector of 16kDa prolactin, impairs the endothelium-cardiomyocyte cross-talk in peripartum cardiomyopathy
Struman, Ingrid ULg; Halkein, Julie ULg; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg et al

in FASEB meeting:the Growth Hormone/Prolactin Family in Biology and Disease. (2012)

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See detailThe proteolytic activity of MT4-MMP is required for its proangiogenic and pro-metastatic promoting effects
Host, Lorin; Paye, Alexandra ULg; Detry, Benoît ULg et al

in International Journal of Cancer = Journal International du Cancer (2012), 131(7), 1537-1548

MT4-MMP expression in breast adenocarcinoma stimulates tumor growth and metastatic spreading to the lung. However whether these pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic effects of MT4-MMP are related to a ... [more ▼]

MT4-MMP expression in breast adenocarcinoma stimulates tumor growth and metastatic spreading to the lung. However whether these pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic effects of MT4-MMP are related to a proteolytic action is not known yet. Through site directed mutagenesis MT4-MMP has been inactivated in cancer cells through Glutamic acid 249 substitution by Alanine in the active site. Active MT4-MMP triggered an angiogenic switch at day 7 after tumor implantation and drastically accelerated subcutaneous tumor growth as well as lung colonization in RAG -/- mice. All these effects were abrogated upon MT4-MMP inactivation. In sharp contrast to most MMPs being primarily of stromal origin, we provide evidence that tumor-derived MT4-MMP, but not host-derived MT4-MMP contributes to angiogenesis. A genetic approach using MT4-MMP-deficient mice revealed that the status of MT4-MMP produced by host cells did not affect the angiogenic response. Despite of this tumor intrinsic feature, to exert its tumor promoting effect, MT4-MMP requires a permissive microenvironment. Indeed, tumor-derived MT4-MMP failed to circumvent the lack of an host angio-promoting factor such as lasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1). Overall, our study demonstrates the key contribution of MT4-MMP catalytic activity in the tumor compartment, at the interface with host cells. It identifies MT4-MMP as a key intrinsic tumor cell determinant that contributes to the elaboration of a permissive microenvironment for metastatic dissemination [less ▲]

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See detailNew and Paradoxical Roles of Matrix Metalloproteinases in the Tumor Microenvironment.
Noël, Agnès ULg; Gutierrez-Fernandez, A; Sounni, Nor Eddine ULg et al

in Frontiers in Pharmacology of Anti-Cancer Drugs (2012), 3(140), 1

Processes such as cell proliferation, angiogenesis, apoptosis, or invasion are strongly influenced by the surrounding microenvironment of the tumor. Therefore, the ability to change these surroundings ... [more ▼]

Processes such as cell proliferation, angiogenesis, apoptosis, or invasion are strongly influenced by the surrounding microenvironment of the tumor. Therefore, the ability to change these surroundings represents an important property through which tumor cells are able to acquire specific functions necessary for tumor growth and dissemination. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute key players in this process, allowing tumor cells to modify the extracellular matrix (ECM) and release cytokines, growth factors, and other cell-surface molecules, ultimately facilitating protease-dependent tumor progression. Remodeling of the ECM by collagenolytic enzymes such as MMP1, MMP8, MMP13, or the membrane-bound MT1-MMP as well as by other membrane-anchored proteases is required for invasion and recruitment of novel blood vessels. However, the multiple roles of the MMPs do not all fit into a simple pattern. Despite the pro-tumorigenic function of certain metalloproteinases, recent studies have shown that other members of these families, such as MMP8 or MMP11, have a protective role against tumor growth and metastasis in animal models. These studies have been further expanded by large-scale genomic analysis, revealing that the genes encoding metalloproteinases, such as MMP8, MMP27, ADAM7, and ADAM29, are recurrently mutated in specific tumors, while several ADAMTSs are epigenetically silenced in different cancers. The importance of these proteases in modifying the tumor microenvironment highlights the need for a deeper understanding of how stroma cells and the ECM can modulate tumor progression. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of CXCL8/IL-8 expression by Zonula Occludens-1 in human breast cancer cells.
Brysse, Anne ULg; Mestdagt, Mélanie ULg; Polette, Myriam et al

in Molecular Cancer Research (2012), 10(1), 121-32

Accumulating data now suggest that ZO-1, once delocalized from tight junctions, could be implicated in the regulation of tumor promoting genes. Because of their major implication in different steps of ... [more ▼]

Accumulating data now suggest that ZO-1, once delocalized from tight junctions, could be implicated in the regulation of tumor promoting genes. Because of their major implication in different steps of tumor progression, we investigated here the influence of ZO-1 on chemokines expression in breast cancer cells. Using GeneArray analysis to compare chemokine mRNA expression in breast tumor cells transfected with a siRNA against ZO-1, we identified CXCL-8/IL-8 as a major potential target of ZO-1 signaling, being strongly downregulated following ZO-1 siRNA transfection. Examining further the relationship between ZO-1 and IL-8, we first demonstrated that CXCL8/IL-8 expression correlates with a relocalization of ZO-1 in several breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, CXCL8/IL-8 is downregulated in invasive BT549 cells transfected with 3 different ZO-1 siRNA and overexpressed in non-invasive BT20 and SKBR3 cells transfected with vectors expressing ZO-1. We also provide evidence for an activation of the CXCL8/IL-8 promoter by ZO-1. Finally, we demonstrate that the regulation of CXCL8/IL-8 by ZO-1 is independent of the beta-catenin pathway. Our results thus clearly demonstrate an implication of ZO-1 in CXCL8/IL-8 regulation. Because of the major implications of CXCL8/IL-8 in tumor invasion, such a regulation could play an important role in breast cancer progression. [less ▲]

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See detailNUCLEAR DELIVERY OF A THERAPEUTIC PEPTIDE BY LONG CIRCULATING pH-SENSITIVE LIPOSOMES: BENEFITS OVER CLASSICAL VESICLES
Ducat, Emilie; Deprez, Juile; Noël, Agnès ULg et al

Poster (2011, December 06)

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See detailThe Antiangiogenic 16K Prolactin Impairs Functional Tumor Neovascularization by Inhibiting Vessel Maturation
Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Berndt, Sarah et al

in PLoS ONE (2011), 6(11), 27318-27318

Background: Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature, plays an essential role in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. 16K hPRL, the antiangiogenic 16-kDa N-terminal ... [more ▼]

Background: Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature, plays an essential role in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. 16K hPRL, the antiangiogenic 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin was shown to prevent tumor growth and metastasis by modifying tumor vessel morphology. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we investigated the effect of 16K hPRL on tumor vessel maturation and on the related signaling pathways. We show that 16K hPRL treatment leads, in a murine B16-F10 tumor model, to a dysfunctional tumor vasculature with reduced pericyte coverage, and disruption of the PDGF-B/PDGFR-B, Ang/Tie2, and Delta/Notch pathways. In an aortic ring assay, 16K hPRL impairs endothelial cell and pericyte outgrowth from the vascular ring. In addition, 16K hPRL prevents pericyte migration to endothelial cells. This event was independent of a direct inhibitory effect of 16K hPRL on pericyte viability, proliferation, or migration. In endothelial cell-pericyte cocultures, we found 16K hPRL to disturb Notch signaling. Conclusions/Significance: Taken together, our data show that 16K hPRL impairs functional tumor neovascularization by inhibiting vessel maturation and for the first time that an endogenous antiangiogenic agent disturbs Notch signaling. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of 16K hPRL action and highlight its potential for use in anticancer therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailInhibition of Experimental Corneal Neovascularization by Sunitinib Administration
Detry, Benoît ULg; BLACHER, Silvia ULg; Erpicum, Charlotte ULg et al

Poster (2011, October)

Cornea engraftment is the most common organ transplantation practiced around the world. The cornea is totally devoid of blood or lymphatic vessels, except in a peripheral zone called the limbus. This ... [more ▼]

Cornea engraftment is the most common organ transplantation practiced around the world. The cornea is totally devoid of blood or lymphatic vessels, except in a peripheral zone called the limbus. This property, named “corneal angiogenic privilege”, is conserved among all mammals to maintain cornea transparency and optimal visual acuity. In pathological conditions such as trauma, infections or hypoxia, blood and lymphatic vessels can grow into the avascular cornea, reducing visual acuity. In case of keratoplasty, it also considerably increases the risk of cornea graft rejection and is so considered as a high-risk keratoplasty. Treatments improving cornea survival after transplantation need to be developed, notably aiming at blocking corneal neovascularization. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of Sunitinib, a broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor, to reduce experimental corneal neovascularization. Cornea vascularization was induced by thermal cauterization applied in the center of C57Bl6 mice cornea, daily feeded with 40mg/kg Sunitinib or vehicule. Corneas were immunolabeled as whole mounts for CD31 and Lyve-1 to evidence blood and lymphatic vessels, 7, 11 and 17 days after cauterization. Whole mount pictures were analyzed by computer-assisted quantification, and relative vascular area, end-point density, node density, length density and maximal length of the vessels were determined to finely characterize blood and lymphatic vascular networks. We observed an inhibition of angiogenesis after 17 days in Sunitinib treated mice, where blood vessel relative surface, end-point density, branching density and length density were 1.8-fold decreased. Maximum length of blood vessels was also significantly reduced in the Sunitinib treated group at days 11 and 17. Lymphangiogenesis was strongly inhibited from day 6 to day 17 after cauterization where all parameters, except maximum length of lymphatic vessels, were significantly decreased. In case of transient Sunitinib administration (feeding during the 7 first days), we did not observe any reduction in the extent of blood or lymphatic networks developing 21 days after lesion induction. In vitro experimentations using the aortic and lymphatic ring assays showed a strong angiogenesis inhibition induced by Sunitinib while lymphangiogenesis was not inhibited. Our results show that the use of Sunitinib can strongly affect corneal neovascularisation and could enter in early treatment of such eye lesions to avoid vision loss and risk of cornea graft rejection. However, a punctual use of such tyrosine kinase inhibitor is not sufficient to stem neovascular reaction. In vitro experimentations show strong angiogenesis inhibition but normal lymphangiogenesis, suggesting indirect inhibitory effect of Sunitinib on corneal lymphangiogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailDigging deeper into lymphatic vessel formation in vitro and in vivo
Detry, Benoît ULg; Bruyère, F.; Erpicum, Charlotte ULg et al

in BMC Cell Biology (2011), 12

Background Abnormal lymphatic vessel formation (lymphangiogenesis) is associated with different pathologies such as cancer, lymphedema, psoriasis and graft rejection. Lymphatic vasculature displays ... [more ▼]

Background Abnormal lymphatic vessel formation (lymphangiogenesis) is associated with different pathologies such as cancer, lymphedema, psoriasis and graft rejection. Lymphatic vasculature displays distinctive features than blood vasculature, and mechanisms underlying the formation of new lymphatic vessels during physiological and pathological processes are still poorly documented. Most studies on lymphatic vessel formation are focused on organism development rather than lymphangiogenic events occurring in adults. We have here studied lymphatic vessel formation in two in vivo models of pathological lymphangiogenesis (corneal assay and lymphangioma). These data have been confronted to those generated in the recently set up in vitro model of lymphatic ring assay. Ultrastructural analyses through Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were performed to investigate tube morphogenesis, an important differentiating process observed during endothelial cell organization into capillary structures. [less ▲]

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See detailMT-MMPs as regulators of vessel stability associated with angiogenesis
Sounni, Nor Eddine ULg; Paye, Alexandra ULg; Host, Lorin et al

in Frontiers in Pharmacology of Anti-Cancer Drugs (2011), 2:111

The development of vascular system depends on the coordinated activity of a number of distinct families of molecules including growth factors and their receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular ... [more ▼]

The development of vascular system depends on the coordinated activity of a number of distinct families of molecules including growth factors and their receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, and proteolytic enzymes. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a family of ECM degrading enzymes required for both physiological and pathological angiogenesis. Increasing evidence, point to a direct role of membrane type-MMPs (MT-MMPs) in vascular system stabilization, maturation, and leakage. Our understanding of the nature of MT-MMP interaction with extracellular and cell surface molecules and their multiple roles in vessel walls and perivascular stroma may provide new insights into mechanisms underlying vascular cell-ECM interactions and cell fate decisions in pathological conditions. Regulation of vascular leakage by MT-MMP interactions with the ECM could also lead to novel targeting opportunities for drug delivery in tumor. This review will shed lights on the emerging roles of MT1-MMP and MT4-MMP in vascular system alterations associated with cancer progression. [less ▲]

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See detailInvolvement of z-MMP-2 in Zebrafish lymphangiogenesis
Paupert, Jenny ULg; Pendeville, Hélène; Detry, Benoît ULg et al

Poster (2011, May)

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See detailThe antiangiogenic 16K prolactin disturbs functional tumor neovascularization by affecting vessel maturation
Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Berndt, Sarah et al

Poster (2011, May)

16K hPRL, the antiangiogenic 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin was shown to prevent tumor growth and metastasis by modifying tumor vessel morphology. Here we investigated the effect of 16K ... [more ▼]

16K hPRL, the antiangiogenic 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin was shown to prevent tumor growth and metastasis by modifying tumor vessel morphology. Here we investigated the effect of 16K hPRL on tumor vessel maturation and on the related signaling pathways. We show that 16K hPRL treatment leads, in a murine B16-F10 tumor model, to a dysfunctional tumor vasculature with reduced pericyte coverage, and disruption of the PDGF-B/PDGFR-B, Ang/Tie2, and Delta/Notch pathways. In an aortic ring assay, 16K hPRL impairs endothelial cell and pericyte outgrowth from the vascular ring. In addition, 16K hPRL prevents pericyte migration to endothelial cells. This event was independent of a direct inhibitory effect of 16K hPRL on pericyte viability, proliferation, or migration. In endothelial cell-pericyte cocultures, we found 16K hPRL to disturb Notch signaling, this being the first time such an effect is observed with an endogenous antiangiogenic agent. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of 16K hPRL action and highlight its potential for use in anticancer therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailMir-146a : A new angiostatic miRNA with tumor-suppressive properties
Halkein, Julie ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Malvaux, Ludovic et al

Poster (2011, March)

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See detailMiR-146a an angiostatic miRNA elevated in peripartum cardiomyopathy
Halkein, Julie ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Malvaux, Ludovic et al

Poster (2011, March)

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See detailMiR-146a: an angiostatic miRNA with tumor-suppressive properties
Halkein, Julie ULg; Bovy, Nicolas ULg; Castermans, Karolien et al

Poster (2011, February)

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See detailMiR-146a an angiostatic miRNA elevated in peripartum cardiomyopathy
Halkein, Julie ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Malvaux, Ludovic et al

Poster (2011, February)

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See detailmicroRNA-21 Exhibits Anti-Angiogenic Function by Targeting RhoB Expression in Endothelial Cells
Sabatel, Céline; Malvaux, Ludovic; Bovy, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2011, February)

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See detailNovel HDAC/DNMT Twin inhibitors interfere with angiogenesis
Shiva Shankar, Thammadihalli Veerasangaiah ULg; Sulka, Béatrice ULg; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

Poster (2011, January 31)

DNA methylation and histone deacetylation are two key epigenetic modifications that play central role in regulation of gene expression. Several studies have shown that histone deacetylases (HDAC) and DNA ... [more ▼]

DNA methylation and histone deacetylation are two key epigenetic modifications that play central role in regulation of gene expression. Several studies have shown that histone deacetylases (HDAC) and DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) inhibitors are potent anti-angiogenic compounds. Though combination of HDAC and DNMT inhibitors are now being examined in clinical trials of hematological malignancies, little work has been done to understand the effect of this combination on physiological and tumoral angiogenesis. We have designed and tested a family of twin drugs with intrinsic HDAC and DNMT inhibitory activities in relevant models of angiogenesis in vitro (Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells – HUVEC and aortic ring) and in vivo (chick chorioallantoic membrane and Zebrafish). We have identified a lead compound having quantifiable anti-angiogenic effect without cytotoxicity affecting global histone acetylation and DNA methylation levels. In order to elucidate its anti-angiogenic mechanism, we characterized gene expression pattern simultaneously with the methylation profile of HUVEC cells treated with the lead compound and reference epigenetic modulators. This approach based on parallel microarray analyses permitted us to underscore a list of genes exclusively affected by the lead compound but not by other HDAC or DNMT inhibitors. These genes were then analyzed using the Ingenuity Pathway software revealing potential involvement of a subset of genes in angiogenesis. Our present aim is to validate the expression levels of a series of genes with respect to epigenetic mechanisms (histone modifications and DNA methylation). Finally, the biological relevance of the target genes will be explored by RNA silencing. Hence, we are using these novel epigenetic modulators as a tool to understand the regulatory mechanism of angiogenesis and to develop effective approaches to treat cancer. [less ▲]

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See detaildoes neoadjuvant radiotherapy promote tumor dissemination ,
Leroi, Natacha ULg; boujouf, Sarah; COUCKE, Philippe ULg et al

Poster (2011, January)

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See detailMiR-146a an angiostatic miRNA elevated in peripartum cardiomyopathy
Halkein, Julie ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Malvaux, Ludovic et al

Poster (2011, January)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (3 ULg)