References of "Noël, Agnès"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailAttempt to enhance the suicide gene therapy agaisnt breast cancer cells by using connexin 43 gene
Grignet, Christine ULg; Hajitou, Amin; Noël, Agnès ULg et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (2002), 57(2), 99

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMurine 5T multiple myeloma cells induce angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo
Van Valckenborgh, E.; De Raeve, H.; Devy, L. et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2002), 86(5), 796-802

Multiple myeloma is a B cell malignancy. Recently, it has been demonstrated that bone marrow samples of patients with multiple myeloma display an enhanced angiogenesis. The mechanisms involved seem to be ... [more ▼]

Multiple myeloma is a B cell malignancy. Recently, it has been demonstrated that bone marrow samples of patients with multiple myeloma display an enhanced angiogenesis. The mechanisms involved seem to be multiple and complex. We here demonstrate that the murine 5T multiple myeloma models are able to induce angiogenesis in vitro by using a rat aortic ring assay and in vivo by determining the microvessel density. The rat aortic rings cultured in 5T multiple myeloma conditioned medium exhibit a higher number of longer and more branched microvessels than the rings cultured in control medium. In bone marrow samples from 5T multiple myeloma diseased mice, a statistically significant increase of the microvessel density was observed when compared to bone marrow samples from age-matched controls. The angiogenic phenotype of both 5T multiple myeloma cells could be related, at least in part, to their capacity to produce vascular endothelial growth factor. These data clearly demonstrate that the 5T multiple myeloma models are good models to study angiogenesis in multiple myeloma and will allow to unravel the mechanisms of neovascularisation, as well as to test new putative inhibitors of angiogenesis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe antitumoral effect of endostatin and angiostatin is associated with a down-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor expression in tumor cells
Hajitou, Amin; Grignet, Christine ULg; Devy, L. et al

in FASEB Journal (2002), 16

Endostatin and angiostatin are known as tumor-derived angiogenesis inhibitors, but their mechanisms of action are not yet completely defined. We report here that endostatin and angiostatin, delivered by ... [more ▼]

Endostatin and angiostatin are known as tumor-derived angiogenesis inhibitors, but their mechanisms of action are not yet completely defined. We report here that endostatin and angiostatin, delivered by adenoviral vectors, reduced in vitro the neovessel formation in the mouse aortic ring assay by 85 and 40%, respectively. We also demonstrated in vivo that both endostatin and angiostatin inhibited local invasion and tumor vascularization of transplanted murine malignant keratinocytes, and reduced by 50 and 90% the development of highly vascularized murine mammary tumors. This inhibition of tumor growth was associated with a reduction of tumor vascularization. Expression analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) carried out in the mouse aortic ring model revealed a 3- to 10-fold down-regulation of VEGF mRNA expression in endostatin-treated rings. A similar down-regulation of VEGF expression at both mRNA and protein levels was also observed in the two in vivo cancer models after treatment with each angiogenesis inhibitor. This suggests that endostatin and angiostatin effects may be mediated, at least in part, by their ability to down-regulate VEGF expression within the tumor. This work provides evidence that endostatin and angiostatin act on tumor cells themselves. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUpregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in murine 5T33 multiple myeloma cells by interaction with bone marrow endothelial cells
Van Valckenborgh, E.; Bakkus, M.; Munaut, Carine ULg et al

in International Journal of Cancer = Journal International du Cancer (2002), 101

MM is a B-cell malignancy mainly characterized by monoclonal expansion of plasma cells in the BM, presence of paraprotein in serum and occurrence of osteolytic bone lesions. MMPs are a family of ... [more ▼]

MM is a B-cell malignancy mainly characterized by monoclonal expansion of plasma cells in the BM, presence of paraprotein in serum and occurrence of osteolytic bone lesions. MMPs are a family of proteolytic enzymes that can contribute to cancer growth, invasion, angiogenesis, bone degradation and other processes important in the pathogenesis of MM. We investigated MMP-9 production in the 5T33MM murine model. Expression of MMP-9 protein in supernatant and cell extracts was analyzed by gelatin zymography. The in vitro, stroma-independent variant 5T33MMvt showed no protein expression of MMP-9 in contrast to in vivo growing MM cells, 5T33MMvv. However, when 5T33MMvt cells were injected into naive mice and isolated after tumor take (5T33MMvt-vv), they secreted a significant amount of MMP-9. These results were confirmed by specific staining of cytospins with an anti-MMP-9 antibody. The MMP-9 production by 5T33MMvt-vv cells disappeared when the cells were recultured in vitro. These data demonstrated that upregulation of MMP-9 occurs in vivo and that this process is dependent on the microenvironment. Cocultures of 5T33MMvt cells with STR10 BMECs induced MMP-9 in MM cells, as determined by both gelatin zymography and flow-cytometric analysis. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that MMP-9 production by MM cells is upregulated in vivo by the interaction of MM cells with BMECs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInduction of Sparc by Vegf in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells
Kato, Y.; Lewalle, J. M.; Baba, Y. et al

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (2001), 287(2), 422-6

SPARC/osteonectin/BM-40 is a matricellular protein that is thought to be involved in angiogenesis and endothelial barrier function. Previously, we have detected high levels of SPARC expression in ... [more ▼]

SPARC/osteonectin/BM-40 is a matricellular protein that is thought to be involved in angiogenesis and endothelial barrier function. Previously, we have detected high levels of SPARC expression in endothelial cells (ECs) adjacent to carcinomas of kidney and tongue. Although SPARC-derived peptide showed an angiogenic effect, intact SPARC itself inhibited the mitogenic activity of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for ECs by the inhibiting phosphorylation of flt-1 (VEGF receptor 1) and subsequent ERK activation. Thus, the role of SPARC in tumor angiogenesis, stimulation or inhibition, is still unclear. To clarify the role of SPARC in tumor growth and progression, we determined the effect of VEGF on the expression of SPARC in human microvascular EC line, HMEC-1, and human umbilical vein ECs. VEGF increased the levels of SPARC protein and steady-state levels of SPARC mRNA in serum-starved HMEC-1 cells. Inhibitors (SB202190 and SB203580) of p38, a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, attenuated VEGF-stimulated SPARC production in ECs. Since intact SPARC inhibits phosphorylation ERK MAP kinase in VEGF signaling, it was suggested that SPARC plays a dual role in the VEGF functions, tumor angiogenesis, and extravasation of tumors mediated by the increased permeability of endothelial barrier function. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (5 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects on cellular invasion of two synthetic coumarins
Kempen, I.; Papapostolou, D.; Pochet, L. et al

Conference (2001, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects on cellular invasion of 6-(acetoxymethyl)-2-oxo-2H-1-benzopyran-3-carboxylic acid derivatives
Kempen, I.; Pochet, L.; Papapostolu, D. et al

Poster (2001, April 21)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDown-Regulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor by Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2: Effect on in Vivo Mammary Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis
Hajitou, Amin; Sounni, Nor Eddine ULg; Devy, Laetitia et al

in Cancer Research (2001), 61(8), 3450-7

The tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) has at least two independent functions, i.e., regulation of matrix metalloproteinases and growth promoting activity. We investigated the effects of ... [more ▼]

The tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) has at least two independent functions, i.e., regulation of matrix metalloproteinases and growth promoting activity. We investigated the effects of TIMP-2 overexpression, induced by retroviral mediated gene transfer, on the in vivo development of mammary tumors in syngeneic mice inoculated with EF43.fgf-4 cells. The EF43.fgf-4 cells established by stably infecting the normal mouse mammary EF43 cells with a retroviral expression vector for the fgf-4 oncogene, are highly tumorigenic and overproduce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Despite a promotion of the in vitro growth rate of EF43.fgf-4 cells overexpressing timp-2, the in vivo tumor growth was delayed. At day 17 post-cell injection, the volume of tumor derived from TIMP-2-overexpressing cells was reduced by 80% as compared with that obtained with control cells. Overexpression of TIMP-2 was associated with a down-regulation of VEGF expression in vitro and in vivo, a reduction of vessel size, density, and blood supply in the induced tumors. In addition, TIMP-2 completely inhibited the angiogenic activity of EF43.fgf-4 cell-conditioned medium in vitro using a rat aortic ring model. Our findings suggest that overexpression of TIMP-2 delays growth and angiogenesis of mammary carcinoma in vivo and that down-regulation of VEGF expression may play an important role in this TIMP-2-mediated antitumoral and antiangiogenic effects. Finally the in vivo delivery of TIMP-2, as assessed by i.v. injection of recombinant adenoviruses vectors, significantly reduced the growth of the EF43.fgf-4-induced tumors. This effect of TIMP-2 was shown to be equally comparable with that of angiostatin, a known potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (10 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNew Functions of Stromal Proteases and Their Inhibitors in Tumor Progression
Noël, Agnès ULg; Albert, V.; Bajou, Khalid ULg et al

in Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America (2001), 10(2), 417-32

Acquisition of invasive metastatic potential through protease expression is a key event in tumor progression. In carcinomas, the production of metalloproteinases and serine proteinases is regulated by a ... [more ▼]

Acquisition of invasive metastatic potential through protease expression is a key event in tumor progression. In carcinomas, the production of metalloproteinases and serine proteinases is regulated by a cross talk between stromal cells and cancer cells. Paradoxically, high rather than low levels of their inhibitors predict poor survival of patients suffering from a variety of cancers. Recent observations suggest a much more complex role of these inhibitors in tumor progression than expected initially. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 on Choroidal Neovascularization
Lambert, Vincent ULg; Munaut, Carine ULg; Frankenne, F. et al

in FASEB Journal (2001), 15(6), 1021-7

High levels of the plasminogen activators, but also their inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), have been documented in neovascularization of severe ocular pathologies such as diabetic ... [more ▼]

High levels of the plasminogen activators, but also their inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), have been documented in neovascularization of severe ocular pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy or age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the primary cause of irreversible photoreceptors loss, and current therapies are limited. PAI-1 has recently been shown to be essential for tumoral angiogenesis. We report here that deficient PAI-1 expression in mice prevented the development of subretinal choroidal angiogenesis induced by laser photocoagulation. When systemic and local PAI-1 expression was achieved by intravenous injection of a replication-defective adenoviral vector expressing human PAI-1 cDNA, the wild-type pattern of choroidal angiogenesis was restored. These observations demonstrate the proangiogenic activity of PAI-1 not only in tumoral models, but also in choroidal experimental neovascularization sharing similarities with human AMD. They identify therefore PAI-1 as a potential target for therapeutic ocular anti-angiogenic strategies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor PAI-1 Controls in Vivo Tumor Vascularization by Interaction with Proteases, Not Vitronectin. Implications for Antiangiogenic Strategies
Bajou, Khalid ULg; Masson, Véronique ULg; Gerard, R. D. et al

in Journal of Cell Biology (2001), 152(4), 777-84

The plasminogen (Plg)/plasminogen activator (PA) system plays a key role in cancer progression, presumably via mediating extracellular matrix degradation and tumor cell migration. Consequently, urokinase ... [more ▼]

The plasminogen (Plg)/plasminogen activator (PA) system plays a key role in cancer progression, presumably via mediating extracellular matrix degradation and tumor cell migration. Consequently, urokinase-type PA (uPA)/plasmin antagonists are currently being developed for suppression of tumor growth and angiogenesis. Paradoxically, however, high levels of PA inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) are predictive of a poor prognosis for survival of patients with cancer. We demonstrated previously that PAI-1 promoted tumor angiogenesis, but by an unresolved mechanism. We anticipated that PAI-1 facilitated endothelial cell migration via its known interaction with vitronectin (VN) and integrins. However, using adenoviral gene transfer of PAI-1 mutants, we observed that PAI-1 promoted tumor angiogenesis, not by interacting with VN, but rather by inhibiting proteolytic activity, suggesting that excessive plasmin proteolysis prevents assembly of tumor vessels. Single deficiency of uPA, tissue-type PA (tPA), uPA receptor, or VN, as well as combined deficiencies of uPA and tPA did not impair tumor angiogenesis, whereas lack of Plg reduced it. Overall, these data indicate that plasmin proteolysis, even though essential, must be tightly controlled during tumor angiogenesis, probably to allow vessel stabilization and maturation. These data provide insights into the clinical paradox whereby PAI-1 promotes tumor progression and warrant against the uncontrolled use of uPA/plasmin antagonists as tumor angiogenesis inhibitors. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMatrix Metalloproteinases and TIMP-1 production by peripheral blood granulocytes from COPD patients and asthmatics
Cataldo, Didier ULg; Munaut, Carine ULg; Noël, Agnès ULg et al

in Allergy (2001), 56(2), 145-51

Both asthmatic and COPD patients were found to have increased amounts of granulocytes and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in their sputum. The present study was conducted to investigate whether the ... [more ▼]

Both asthmatic and COPD patients were found to have increased amounts of granulocytes and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in their sputum. The present study was conducted to investigate whether the elevated amounts of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 found in such patients' airways may be linked to an enhanced secretion by granulocytes. Blood granulocytes from asthmatics (n = 10), COPD patients (n = 11), and healthy controls (n = 11) were isolated and cultured under basal conditions or after stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP). MMP-9 activity was detected by zymography while MMP-8 and TIMP-1 levels were measured by ELISA. In zymography, pro- and activated forms of MMP-9 were present in each group (healthy subjects, asthmatics, and COPD patients). Spontaneous release was not different between the three groups. Stimulation by fMLP and PMA increased to a similar extent the release of MMP-9 by granulocytes in all the three groups. TIMP-1 levels were also increased after stimulation by PMA and fMLP only in healthy subjects and COPD patients. MMP-8 levels were barely detectable. We conclude that circulating granulocytes from COPD patients and asthmatics do not display an abnormal secretion of MMP-9, and that granulocytes from asthmatics have an impaired ability to release TIMP-1 upon stimulation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (5 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailRole de l'inhibiteur des activateurs de plasminogene de type 1 dans l'angiogenese tumorale
Bajou, Khalid ULg; Devy, L.; Masson, Véronique ULg et al

in Thérapie (2001), 56(5, Sep-Oct), 465-72

The plasminogen/plasmin system plays a key role in cancer progression, presumably via mediating extracellular matrix degradation and tumour cell migration. High levels of components of the plasminogen ... [more ▼]

The plasminogen/plasmin system plays a key role in cancer progression, presumably via mediating extracellular matrix degradation and tumour cell migration. High levels of components of the plasminogen activation system, and paradoxically also its inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), have been correlated with a poor prognosis for patients with cancers of different types. Recent findings clearly suggest that PAI-1 is essential for capillary sprouting during tumour angiogenesis. Moreover, there is accumulating evidence that both the urokinase receptor and PAI-1 are multifunctional proteins involved not only in extracellular matrix proteolysis but also in cellular adhesion and migration through their binding site for vitronectin. The understanding of whether PAI-1 plays a regulatory role in angiogenesis by tightly controlling proteolytic activity or by influencing cell migration could allow a new anti-angiogenic approach for tumour therapy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence du régime d’administration continu ou discontinu d’acétate de nomégestrol sur l’apoptose des cellules mammaires
Van den Brule, F; DESREUX, Joëlle ULg; BELIARD, Aude ULg et al

in Reproduction Humaine et Hormones (2001), 15

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPresence of Oestrogen Receptor Type Beta in Human Retina
Munaut, Carine ULg; Lambert, Vincent ULg; Noël, Agnès ULg et al

in British Journal of Ophthalmology (2001), 85(7), 877-82

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Recent studies have demonstrated the existence of two oestrogen receptor subtypes alpha (ORalpha) and beta (ORbeta) with significant differences of expression among organs. Since ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Recent studies have demonstrated the existence of two oestrogen receptor subtypes alpha (ORalpha) and beta (ORbeta) with significant differences of expression among organs. Since important pathologies of human eye could be linked to hormonal status, the expression of ORbeta in ocular posterior segment was sought. METHODS: Immunohistochemical localisation of ORbeta and ORalpha protein and detection of OR mRNAs by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed in macular and extramacular regions of the retina and in the choroid on male and female donors eyes. RESULTS: ORbeta protein was localised in the ganglion cell layer and in the choroid. At the transcriptional level, mRNA for ORbeta and for ORalpha were both present. Local differences in the expression level were observed, however, suggesting the possibility of variation in the ratio of ORalpha v ORbeta. CONCLUSIONS: The coexistence of two oestrogen receptor subtypes in the human ocular posterior segment raises acute questions about their potential physiological role, but offers a perspective for preferential targeting of a specific receptor subtype. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 99 (39 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDown-Regulation of MT1-MMP expression by the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen inhibits bronchial tumor cell line invasion
Martinella-Catusse, C.; Polette, M.; Noël, Agnès ULg et al

in Laboratory Investigation : Journal of Technical Methods & Pathology (2001), 81

The basement membrane (BM) is the first barrier encountered by tumor cells when they become invasive. Moreover, some invasive tumor clusters are surrounded by a remnant or neosynthetized BM material. We ... [more ▼]

The basement membrane (BM) is the first barrier encountered by tumor cells when they become invasive. Moreover, some invasive tumor clusters are surrounded by a remnant or neosynthetized BM material. We have previously reported the presence of a particular alpha chain of type IV collagen, the alpha3(IV) chain, in bronchopulmonary carcinomas. This chain was not detected in the normal bronchial epithelium, but was found around some invasive tumor cluster BM. In the present study, we examined the effects of the alpha3(IV) chain on the invasive properties of bronchial tumor cell lines, with special emphasis on their expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and its activator, membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), which is largely involved in tumor progression. Two epithelial bronchial cell lines (16HBE14o- and BZR), showing different invasive abilities, were evaluated. Using the Boyden chamber invasion assay, we demonstrated that the alpha3(IV) chain inhibits the invasive properties of BZR cells and modifies their morphology by inducing an epithelial cell shape. In the presence of the recombinant NC1 domain of the alpha3(IV) chain, the expression of MMP-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) was not modified in either cell line. The NC1 alpha3(IV) domain did not modulate the MT1-MMP expression of noninvasive 16HBE14o- cells, whereas a 50% decrease of MT1-MMP mRNA was observed in invasive BZR cells. Accordingly, Western blot analyses showed a disappearance of the 45-kd MT1-MMP form when BZR cells were treated with the recombinant NC1 alpha3(IV) domain. These findings suggest that the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen may play a role in tumor invasion, at least by decreasing the expression and synthesis of MT1-MMP. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSynergism between vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor contributes to angiogenesis and plasma extravasation in pathological conditions
Carmeliet, Peter; Moons, Lieve; Luttun, Aernout et al

in Nature Medicine (2001), 7(5), 575-583

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates angiogenesis by activating VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). The role of its homolog, placental growth factor (PlGF), remains unknown. Both VEGF and PlGF bind ... [more ▼]

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates angiogenesis by activating VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). The role of its homolog, placental growth factor (PlGF), remains unknown. Both VEGF and PlGF bind to VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1), but it is unknown whether VEGFR-1, which exists as a soluble or a membrane-bound type, is an inert decoy or a signaling receptor for PlGF during angiogenesis. Here, we report that embryonic angiogenesis in mice was not affected by deficiency of PlGF (Pgf -/-). VEGF-B, another ligand of VEGFR-1, did not rescue development in Pgf -/- mice. However, loss of PlGF impaired angiogenesis, plasma extravasation and collateral growth during ischemia, inflammation, wound healing and cancer. Transplantation of wild-type bone marrow rescued the impaired angiogenesis and collateral growth in Pgf -/- mice, indicating that PlGF might have contributed to vessel growth in the adult by mobilizing bone-marrow−derived cells. The synergism between PlGF and VEGF was specific, as PlGF deficiency impaired the response to VEGF, but not to bFGF or histamine. VEGFR-1 was activated by PlGF, given that anti-VEGFR-1 antibodies and a Src-kinase inhibitor blocked the endothelial response to PlGF or VEGF/PlGF. By upregulating PlGF and the signaling subtype of VEGFR-1, endothelial cells amplify their responsiveness to VEGF during the 'angiogenic switch' in many pathological disorders. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 387 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImproved Quantification of Angiogenesis in the Rat Aortic Ring Assay
Blacher, Silvia ULg; Devy, L.; Burbridge, M. F. et al

in Angiogenesis (2001), 4(2), 133-42

In vitro angiogenesis assays are essential for the identification of potential angiogenic agents and screening for pharmacological inhibitors. Among these assays, the rat aortic ring model developed by ... [more ▼]

In vitro angiogenesis assays are essential for the identification of potential angiogenic agents and screening for pharmacological inhibitors. Among these assays, the rat aortic ring model developed by Nicosia bridges the gap between in vivo and in vitro models. The quantification of angiogenesis on this system must be applicable to characterise vascular networks of various states of complexity. We present here an improved computer-assisted image analysis which allows: (1) the determination of the aortic ring area and its factor shape; (2) the number of microvessels, the total number of branchings, the maximal microvessel length and the microvessel distribution; (3) the total number of isolated fibroblast-like cells and their distribution. We show that this method is suitable to quantify spontaneous angiogenesis as well as to analyse a complex microvascular network induced by various concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In addition, by evaluating a new parameter, the fibroblast-like cell distribution, our results show that: (1) during spontaneous angiogenic response, maximal fibroblast-like cell migration delimits microvascular outgrowth; and (2) the known angiogenic inhibitor Batimastat prevents endothelial cell sprouting without completely blocking fibroblast-like cell migration. Finally, this new method of quantification is of great interest to better understand angiogenesis and to test pro- or anti-angiogenic agents. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailType Iv Collagen Induces Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 Activation in Ht1080 Fibrosarcoma Cells
Maquoi, Erik ULg; Frankenne, F.; Noël, Agnès ULg et al

in Experimental Cell Research (2000), 261(2), 348-59

Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activation has been described as a "master switch" which triggers tumor spread and metastatic progression. We show here that type IV collagen, a major component of ... [more ▼]

Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activation has been described as a "master switch" which triggers tumor spread and metastatic progression. We show here that type IV collagen, a major component of basement membranes, promotes MMP-2 activation by HT1080 cells. When plated on plastic, HT1080 cells constitutively processed the 66-kDa pro-MMP-2 into a 62-kDa intermediate activated form, most probably through a membrane type (MT) 1 MMP-dependent mechanism. In the presence of type IV collagen, part of this intermediate form was further processed to fully activated 59-kDa MMP-2. This activation was prevented by tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP)-2 and a broad-spectrum hydroxamic acid-based synthetic MMP inhibitor (GI129471). Type IV collagen-mediated pro-MMP-2 activation did not involve either a transcriptional modulation of MMP-2, MT1-MMP, or TIMP-2 expression nor any alteration of MT1-MMP protein synthesis or processing. An inverse relationship between MMP-2 activation and the concentration of secreted TIMP-2 was observed. This is consistent with our previous report that TIMP-2 degradation is probably linked to the MT1-MMP-dependent MMP-2 activation mechanism. Because invasive tumor cells must breach basement membranes at different steps of the metastatic dissemination, the ability of HT1080 cells to activate pro-MMP-2 in the presence of type IV collagen might represent a key regulatory mechanism for the acquisition of an invasive potential. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMMP-2 and MMP-9-Linked Gelatinolytic Activity in the Sputum from Patients with Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Cataldo, Didier ULg; Munaut, Carine ULg; Noël, Agnès ULg et al

in International Archives of Allergy & Immunology (2000), 123(3), 259-67

BACKGROUND: The course of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with bronchial morphological changes. Metalloproteinases are thought to play a role in these structural ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The course of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with bronchial morphological changes. Metalloproteinases are thought to play a role in these structural changes. METHODS: We studied the gelatinolytic activity present in the induced sputum from 20 patients with asthma, 20 with COPD and 19 healthy controls. The assessment of gelatinolytic activity was performed by quantitative zymography, and gelatinolytic species were identified by Western blot analysis. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) was detected by reverse zymography and ELISA. RESULTS: From zymography, we found significantly higher gelatinolytic activity linked to pro-matrix metalloproteinase-9 (pro-MMP-9) in the sputum from asthmatics (p < 0.0001) and COPD patients (p < 0.0001) compared to the control group. Furthermore, the activated form of MMP-9 (85 kD) was found in the sputum from 60% of asthmatics and 85% of COPD patients, but was absent in that of control subjects (p < 0.0001). Importantly, although less frequently detectable than pro-MMP-9, pro- MMP-2 (72 kD) was found more frequently in asthmatics (50%) than in control subjects (5%) (p < 0. 005). We also described two unusual gelatinolytic species of 45 and 120 kD and showed that they derived from MMP-9 according to their ability to bind gelatin and anti-MMP-9 antibody. Levels of TIMP-1 were higher in asthmatics (p < 0.05) and COPD patients (p < 0.05) than in controls. CONCLUSION: Asthmatics and COPD patients display an increased gelatinolytic activity linked to MMP-2 and MMP-9 and higher levels of TIMP-1 in their sputum. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULg)