References of "Luxen, André"
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See detailA Prominent Role for Amygdaloïd Complexes in the Variability of Heart Rate during Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thanh; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 26(Suppl. 1),

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See detailNeural correlates of fast and slow ocular sequence learning
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Ruby, Perrine; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 26(Suppl. 1),

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See detailNeural Correlates of a Non-Image-Forming Response to Light Exposure During the Daytime: a fMRI Study
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Moreau, V et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 26(Suppl. 1),

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See detailNeural mechanisms involved in the detection of our first name : A combined ERPs and PET study
Perrin, Fabien; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Neuropsychologia (2005), 43(1), 12-19

In everyday social interactions, hearing our own first name captures our attention and gives rise to a sense of self-awareness, since it is one of the most socially self related stimulus. In the present ... [more ▼]

In everyday social interactions, hearing our own first name captures our attention and gives rise to a sense of self-awareness, since it is one of the most socially self related stimulus. In the present study, we combined ERPs and PET scan methods to explore the cerebral mechanisms underlying the detection of our own name. While categorical analyses of PET data failed to reveal significant results, we found that the amplitude of the P3 component, elicited when hearing one's own name, correlates with regional cerebral blood changes in right superior temporal sulcus, precuneus and medial prefrontal cortex. Additionally, the latter was more correlated to the P3 obtained for the subject's name compared to that obtained for other first names. These results suggest that the medial prefrontal cortex plays the most prominent role in self-processing. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in severely brain injured patients: Differences between VS and MCS
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2005), 15(3-4, Jul-Sep), 283-289

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS ... [more ▼]

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS patients show activation similar to controls in response to auditory, emotional and noxious stimuli. Despite an apparent clinical similarity between MCS and VS patients, functional imaging data show striking differences in cortical segregation and integration between these two conditions. However, in the absence of a generally accepted neural correlate of consciousness as measured by functional neuroirnaging, clinical assessment remains the gold standard for the evaluation and management of severely brain damaged patients. [less ▲]

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See detailIsolation of an n-alkylated benzylamine derivative from Pseudomonas putida BTP1 as elicitor of induced systemic resistance in bean
Ongena, MARC ULg; Jourdan, Emmanuel ULg; Schafer, M. et al

in Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions (2005), 18(6), 562-569

Root treatment of Phaseolus vulgaris with the nonpathogenic Pseudomonas putida BTP1 led to significant reduction of the disease caused by the pathogen Botrytis cinerea on leaves. The molecular determinant ... [more ▼]

Root treatment of Phaseolus vulgaris with the nonpathogenic Pseudomonas putida BTP1 led to significant reduction of the disease caused by the pathogen Botrytis cinerea on leaves. The molecular determinant of P putida BTP1 mainly responsible for the induced systemic resistance (ISR) was isolated from cell-free culture fluid after growth of the strain in the iron-poor casamino acid medium. Mass spectrometry analyses performed on both the bacterial product and synthetic analogues revealed a polyalkylated benzylamine structure, with the quaternary ammonium substituted by methyl, ethyl, and C-13 aliphatic groups responsible for the relative hydrophobicity of the molecule. The specific involvement of the N-alkylated benzylamine derivative (NABD) in ISR elicitation was first evidenced by testing the purified compound that mimicked the protective effect afforded by crude supernatant samples. The evidence was supported by the loss of elicitor activity of mutants impaired in NABD biosynthesis. Our experiments also showed that other iron-regulated metabolites secreted by the strain are not involved in ISR stimulation. Thus, these results indicate a wider variety of Pseudomonas determinants for ISR than reported to date. [less ▲]

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See detailRadiochemical Synthesis of OCH2F-[18F]MPPF a New Analogue of p-[18F]MPPF for the Study of 5-HT1A Receptors.
Defraiteur, C.; Lemaire, Christian ULg; Luxen, André ULg et al

in Journal of Labelled Compounds & Radiopharmaceuticals (2005), 48

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See detailEx Vivo Evaluation of p-[18F]D-MPPF for the Study of 5-HT1A Receptors.
Defraiteur, C.; Lemaire, Christian ULg; Luxen, André ULg et al

in Journal of Labelled Compounds & Radiopharmaceuticals (2005), 48

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See detailNew Methods For Halogenation of [18F]Fluorinated Benzyl Derivatives.
Kech, C.; Lemaire, Christian ULg; Brichard, L. et al

in Journal of Labelled Compounds & Radiopharmaceuticals (2005), 48

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See detailZerebrale Funktionen bei hirngeschädigten Patienten. Was bedeuten Koma, "vegetative state“, "minimally conscious state“, "Locked-in-Syndrom“ und Hirntod?
Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Pantke, Karl-Heinz; Berré, Jacques et al

in Anaesthesist (2004), 53(12), 1195-1202

Comatose, vegetative, minimally conscious or locked-in patients represent a problem in terms of diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and everyday management at the intensive care unit. The evaluation of ... [more ▼]

Comatose, vegetative, minimally conscious or locked-in patients represent a problem in terms of diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and everyday management at the intensive care unit. The evaluation of possible cognitive functions in these patients is difficult because voluntary movements may be very small, inconsistent and easily exhausted. Functional neuroimaging cannot replace the clinical assessment of patients with altered states of consciousness. Nevertheless, it can describe objectively how deviant from normal the cerebral activity is and its regional distribution at rest and under various conditions of stimulation. The quantification of brain activity differentiates patients who sometimes only differ by a brief and incomplete blink of an eye. In the present paper, we will first try to define consciousness as it can be assessed at the patient's bedside. We then review the major clinical entities of altered states of consciousness encountered in the intensive care unit. Finally, we discuss the functional neuroanatomy of these conditions as assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. [less ▲]

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See detailAre spatial memories strengthened in the human hippocampus during slow wave sleep?
Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg; Fuchs, Sonia et al

in Neuron (2004), 44(3), 535-545

In rats, the firing sequences observed in hippocampal ensembles during spatial learning are replayed during subsequent sleep, suggesting a role for posttraining sleep periods in the offline processing of ... [more ▼]

In rats, the firing sequences observed in hippocampal ensembles during spatial learning are replayed during subsequent sleep, suggesting a role for posttraining sleep periods in the offline processing of spatial memories. Here, using regional cerebral blood flow measurements, we show that, in humans, hippocampal areas that are activated during route learning in a virtual town are likewise activated during subsequent slow wave sleep. Most importantly, we found that the amount of hippocampal activity expressed during slow wave sleep positively correlates with the improvement of performance in route retrieval on the next day. These findings suggest that learning-dependent modulation in hippocampal activity during human sleep reflects the offline processing of recent episodic and spatial memory traces, which eventually leads to the plastic changes underlying the subsequent improvement in performance. [less ▲]

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See detailFluorinated tracers for imaging cancer with positron emission tomography
Couturier, Olivier; Luxen, André ULg; Chatal, Jean-François et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2004), 31(8), 1182-1206

2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 is considered the ideal radioisotope for PET ... [more ▼]

2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 is considered the ideal radioisotope for PET imaging owing to the low positron energy (0.64 MeV), which not only limits the dose rate to the patient but also results in a relatively short range of emission in tissue, thereby providing high-resolution images. Further, the 110-min physical half-life allows for high-yield radiosynthesis, transport from the production site to the imaging site and imaging protocols that may span hours, which permits dynamic studies and assessment of potentially fairly slow metabolic processes. The synthesis of fluorinated tracers as an alternative to FDG was initially tested using nucleophilic fluorination of the molecule, as performed when radiolabelling with iodine-124 or bromide-76. However, in addition to being long, with multiple steps, this procedure is not recommended for bioactive molecules containing reactive groups such as amine or thiol groups. Radiochemical yields are also often low. More recently, radiosynthesis from prosthetic group precursors, which allows easier radiolabelling of biomolecules, has led to the development of numerous fluorinated tracers. Given the wide availability of 18F, such tracers may well develop into important routine tracers. This article is a review of the literature concerning fluorinated radiotracers recently developed and under investigation for possible PET imaging in cancer patients. Two groups can be distinguished. The first includes "generalist" tracers, i.e. tracers amenable to use in a wide variety of tumours and indications, very similar in this respect to FDG. These are tracers for non-specific cell metabolism, such as protein synthesis, amino acid transport, nucleic acid synthesis or membrane component synthesis. The second group consists of "specific" tracers for receptor expression (i.e. oestrogens or somatostatin), cell hypoxia or bone metabolism. [less ▲]

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See detailHighly enantioselective synthesis of no-carrier-added 6-[18F]Fluoro-L-dopa by chiral phase-transfer alkylation
Lemaire, Christian ULg; Gillet, Steve; Guillouet, Stéphane et al

in European Journal of Organic Chemistry (2004), (13), 2899-2904

[F-18]Fluoro-L-dopa, an important radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography (PET), has been synthesized using a phase-transfer alkylation reaction. A chiral quaternary ammonium salt derived ... [more ▼]

[F-18]Fluoro-L-dopa, an important radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography (PET), has been synthesized using a phase-transfer alkylation reaction. A chiral quaternary ammonium salt derived from a Cinchona alkaloid served as phase-transfer catalyst for the enantioselective alkylation of a glycine derivative. The active methylene group of this Schiff-base substrate was deprotonated with cesium hydroxide and rapidly alkylated by the 2-[F-18]fluoro-4,5-dimethoxybenzyl halide (X = Br, I). The reaction proceeded with high yield (> 90%) at 0 degreesC or room temperature in various solvents such as toluene or dichloromethane. Preparation of the [F-18]alkylating agent on a solid support was developed. After labelling, the labeled [F-18]fluoroveratraldehyde was trapped on a (t)C18 cartridge and then converted on the cartridge into the corresponding benzyl halide derivatives by addition of aqueous sodium borohydride and gaseous hydrobromic or -iodic acid. Hydrolysis and purification by preparative HPLC made 6-[F-18]fluoro-L-dopa ready for human injection in a 25-30% decay-corrected radiochemical yield in a synthesis time of 100 min. The product was found to be chemically, radiochemically and enantiomerically pure (ee > 95%). (C) Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH [less ▲]

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See detailImaging a cognitive model of apraxia: The neural substrate of gesture-specific cognitive processes
Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Garraux, Gaëtan ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2004), 21(3), 119-142

The present study aimed to ascertain the neuroanatomical basis of an influential neuropsychological model for upper limb apraxia [Rothi LJ, et al. The Neuropsychology of Action. 1997. Hove, UK: Psychology ... [more ▼]

The present study aimed to ascertain the neuroanatomical basis of an influential neuropsychological model for upper limb apraxia [Rothi LJ, et al. The Neuropsychology of Action. 1997. Hove, UK: Psychology Press]. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured in healthy volunteers using (H2O)-O-15 PET during performance of four tasks commonly used for testing upper limb apraxia, i.e., pantomime of familiar gestures on verbal command, imitation of familiar gestures, imitation of novel gestures, and an action-semantic task that consisted in matching objects for functional use. We also re-analysed data from a previous PET study in which we investigated the neural basis. of the visual analysis of gestures. First; we found that two sets of discrete brain areas are predominantly engaged in the imitation of familiar and novel gestures, respectively. Segregated brain activation for novel gesture mutation concur with neuropsychological reports to support the hypothesis that knowledge about the organization of the human body mediates the transition from visual perception to motor execution when imitating novel gestures [Goldenberg Neuropsychologia 1995;35.63-72]. Second, conjunction analyses revealed distinctive neural bases for most of the gesture-specific cognitive processes proposed in this cognitive model of upper limb apraxia. However, a functional analysis of brain imaging data suggested that one single memory store may be used for "to be-perceived" and "to-be-produced" gestural representations, departing from Rothi et al.'s proposal. Based on the above considerations, we suggest and discuss a revised model for upper limb apraxia that might best account for both brain imaging findings and neuropsychological dissociations reported in the apraxia literature. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailAuditory processing in severely brain injured patients: differences between the minimally conscious state and the persistent vegetative state.
Boly, Mélanie ULg; FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Archives of Neurology (2004), 61(2), 233-8

BACKGROUND: The minimally conscious state (MCS) is a recently defined clinical condition; it differs from the persistent vegetative state (PVS) by the presence of inconsistent, but clearly discernible ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The minimally conscious state (MCS) is a recently defined clinical condition; it differs from the persistent vegetative state (PVS) by the presence of inconsistent, but clearly discernible, behavioral evidence of consciousness. OBJECTIVE: To study auditory processing among patients who are in an MCS, patients who are in a PVS, and healthy control subjects. METHODS: By means of (15)O-radiolabeled water-positron emission tomography, we measured changes in regional cerebral blood flow induced by auditory click stimuli in 5 patients in an MCS, 15 patients in a PVS, and 18 healthy controls. RESULTS: In both patients in an MCS and the healthy controls, auditory stimulation activated bilateral superior temporal gyri (Brodmann areas 41, 42, and 22). In patients in a PVS, the activation was restricted to Brodmann areas 41 and 42 bilaterally. We also showed that, compared with patients in a PVS, patients in an MCS demonstrated a stronger functional connectivity between the secondary auditory cortex and temporal and prefrontal association cortices. CONCLUSIONS: Although assumptions about the level of consciousness in severely brain injured patients are difficult to make, our findings suggest that the cerebral activity observed in patients in an MCS is more likely to lead to higher-order integrative processes, thought to be necessary for the gain of conscious auditory perception. [less ▲]

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