References of "Javaux, Emmanuelle"
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See detailDe l’origine de la vie et de son évolution
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2017)

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See detailMICROPALEONTOLOGY OF THE LOWER MESOPROTEROZOIC ROPER GROUP, AUSTRALIA, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR EARLY EUKARYOTIC EVOLUTION
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULiege; Knoll, Andrew H.

in Journal of Paleontology (2017)

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See detailDiversity and paleobiology of Proterozoic organic-walled microfossils from Arctic Canada
Loron, Corentin ULiege; Javaux, Emmanuelle ULiege

in Steemans, Philippe; Gerrienne, Philippe (Eds.) Miscellanea palaeontologica 2016 (2016, December)

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See detailThe BCCM/ULC collection to conserve the biodiversity and study the secondary metabolites of Polar cyanobacteria
Lara, Yannick ULiege; Durieu, Benoit ULiege; Renard, Marine ULiege et al

Poster (2016, November 16)

In the Polar Regions, Cyanobacteria are the key primary producers and main drivers of the food webs in a wide range of aquatic to terrestrial habitats. For example, they build benthic microbial mats in ... [more ▼]

In the Polar Regions, Cyanobacteria are the key primary producers and main drivers of the food webs in a wide range of aquatic to terrestrial habitats. For example, they build benthic microbial mats in lakes and soil crusts. Their success in these harsh cold conditions can probably be explained by particular adaptations to survive freeze/thaw cycles, seasonally contrasted light intensities, high UV radiations, dessication and other environmental stresses. The BCCM/ULC public collection is funded by the Belgian Science Policy Office since 2011. It has obtained the ISO9001 certification for deposition and distribution of strains, as part of the multi-site certification for the BCCM consortium. This collection aims to gather a representative portion of the polar cyanobacterial diversity with different ecological origins (limnetic mats, soil crusts, cryoconites, endoliths,….) and make it available for researchers to study the taxonomy, evolution, adaptations to harsh environmental conditions, pigments, and genomic make-up. It presently includes 226 cyanobacterial strains, of which 119 are of Antarctic origin (catalogue: http://bccm.belspo.be/catalogues/ulc-catalogue-search). As shown by morphological identification, the strains belong to five orders (Synechococcales, Oscillatoriales, Pleurocapsales, Chroococcidiopsidales and Nostocales). The 16S rRNA and ITS sequences of the strains are being characterized. The first 85 Antarctic strains already studied are distributed into 25 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs = groups of sequences with > 97,5% 16S rRNA similarity), and thus, represent a quite large diversity. Moreover, strains identified as members of the genera Leptolyngbya or Phormidium appear in several lineages. This supports the idea that there is a need to revise the taxonomy of these polyphyletic genera with a simple filamentous morphology. To better understand the functioning, metabolism and adaptative strategies of cyanobacteria in the extreme Antarctic environment, the genome sequencing of 11 strains has been started. Pair-read data from illumina MiSeq runs were obtained and submitted to a bioinformatic pipeline dedicated to the assembly of genomes and search of sequences involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Gene cluster prediction analysis allowed to characterize 20 clusters of NRPS, PKS and hybrid NRPS-PKS from 2 to 66kb. Surprisingly, none of the characterized operons had previously been described in the literature. [less ▲]

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See detailEvolution of biological innovations in early complex cells
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULiege

Conference (2016, August)

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See detailPLANET TOPERS: Planets, Tracing the Transfer, Origin, Preservation, and Evolution of their ReservoirS
Dehant, Véronique ULiege; Kabamba Baludikay, Blaise ULiege; Beghin, Jérémie ULiege et al

in Origins of Life & Evolution of the Biosphere (2016), DOI 10.1007/s11084-016-9488

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See detailHolocene paleoenvironmental reconstructions from Belgian peatbog
Allan, Mohammed ULiege; VERHEYDEN, sophie; Le roux, gael et al

Conference (2016, January 27)

Atmospheric deposition is an important part of the global climate system, and plays a key role in the marine and terrestrial biogeochemical cycles as a source for major and trace nutrient elements ... [more ▼]

Atmospheric deposition is an important part of the global climate system, and plays a key role in the marine and terrestrial biogeochemical cycles as a source for major and trace nutrient elements. Reconstruction of atmospheric deposition is crucial to understand the effects of the increased atmospheric depositions induced by humans on the environment and to help understanding Holocene climate variability. This study investigated potential paleoenvironmental proxies provided by major and trace elements and stable isotopes compositions of peat bogs. Peat bog cores were collected from Hautes-Fagnes plateau (Misten bog) (SE-Belgium). The analyses of Rare Earth Elements (REE) and lithogenic element concentrations as well as Nd isotopes were performed by HR-ICP-MS and MC-ICP-MS respectively, in a  7 m peat section representing 7300 years, dated by 210Pb and 14C methods. The Misten bog is highly affected by atmospheric supplies (natural and anthropogenic) and can be used to establish the changes in atmospheric dust during the Mid-Late Holocene. Dust fluxes show pronounced increase at 3200-2800BC, 600BC, AD600, 1000AD, 1200AD and from 1700 AD corresponding to local and regional human activities combined with climate change. Peat humification and testate amoebae were used to evaluate hydroclimatic conditions. The Nd values show large variability, between -5 and –13, identifying three major sources of dust: local soils, distal volcanic and desert particles. Our results provide evidence that climate forcing may be detected in ombrotrophic peat, even for the historical period that is characterised by a mixed climate-human control. [less ▲]

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See detailPremières traces et diversification de la vie (Chap. XI)
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULiege

in Mastrangelo, victor (Ed.) Formation des systèmes stellaires et planétaires et conditions d’apparition de la vie (2016)

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See detailNew geochronological history of the Mbuji-Mayi Supergroup (Proterozoic, DRC) through U-Pb and Sm-Nd dating
François, Camille ULiege; Kabamba Baludikay, Blaise ULiege; Storme, Jean-Yves et al

in European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016 Vienna, Austria, 2016 (2016)

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See detailThermal maturity of carbonaceous material from Mbuji-Mayi Supergroup (Kasai, Democratic Republic of Congo)
Kabamba Baludikay, Blaise ULiege; Storme, Jean-Yves; Baudet, Daniel et al

in European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016 Vienna, Austria, 2016 (2016)

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See detailMicroanalyzes of remarkable microfossils of the Late Mesoproterozoic–Early Neoproterozoic
Cornet, Yohan ULiege; Beghin, Jérémie ULiege; Kabamba Baludikay, Blaise ULiege et al

in European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016 Vienna, Austria, 2016 (2016)

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See detailGéosphère et biosphère : une histoire intriquée
De Wever, Patrick; Lecointre, Guillaume; Javaux, Emmanuelle ULiege

in Gargaud, Muriel; Lecointre, Guillaume (Eds.) l’Evolution : de l’univers aux sociétés, objets et concepts. (2015)

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