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See detailSubstituted azafluorenones: access from dihalogeno diaryl ketones by palladium-catalyzed auto-tandem processes and evaluation of their antibacterial, antifungal, antimalarial and antiproliferative activities
Marquise, Nada; Chevallier, Floris; Nassar, Ekhlas et al

in Tetrahedron (2016), 72(6), 825-836

Substituted azafluorenones were synthesized from dihalogeno diaryl ketones under palladium catalysis by combining, in auto-tandem processes, Suzuki coupling and intramolecular arylation reactions ... [more ▼]

Substituted azafluorenones were synthesized from dihalogeno diaryl ketones under palladium catalysis by combining, in auto-tandem processes, Suzuki coupling and intramolecular arylation reactions. Different dihalogenated diaryl ketones, prepared by sequential deprotocupration-aroylation, were identified as suitable substrates to this purpose. Conditions were identified to allow successful syntheses of several 6-/7-arylated 4-azafluorenones, 1-substituted 4-azafluorenones, 2-phenyl-3-azafluorenone, and 4-phenyl-3-azafluorenone from 3-(bromobenzoyl)-2-chloropyridines, 3-benzoyl-4-bromo-2-chloropyridines, 4-benzoyl-2,5-dichloropyridine, and 4-benzoyl-2,3-dichloropyridine, respectively. Some of the synthesized compounds exhibit interesting biological properties [less ▲]

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See detailChemical Fingerprint and Anti-Sickling Activity of Rosmarinic Acid and Methanolic Extracts from Three Species of Ocimum from DR Congo
Tshilanda, Dorothée D.; Mutwale Kapepula, Paulin ULg; Onyamboko, Damase V. N. et al

in Journal of biosciences and Medicines (2016), 04(January), 59--68

The aim of this study was to characterize the polyphenolic composition by determination of chemical fingerprints of Methanolic extracts of Ocimum canum Sims, Ocimum basilicum L. and Ocimum gratissimum L ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to characterize the polyphenolic composition by determination of chemical fingerprints of Methanolic extracts of Ocimum canum Sims, Ocimum basilicum L. and Ocimum gratissimum L. from Democratic Republic of Congo and to compare their antisickling activity of that of rosmarinic acid, the major compound to those of methanolic extracts. Phytochemical analysis performed by TLC and HPLC analysis, showed that rosmarinic acid is the most abundant phenolic acid in these Ocimum species according to the following order O. basilicum L., O. gratissimum L. and O. canum Sims. Methanolic extracts of these three species and pure rosmarinic acid showed significant antisickling activities with minimal concentration of normalization values of 0.18 ± 0.03, 0.23 ± 0.04, 0.26 ± 0.04 and 0.31 ± 0.05 mg/mL for rosmarinic acid, O. basilicum L., O. gratissimum L. and O. canum Sims methanolic extracts respectively. The antisickling activity order is the same as that of the rosmarinic acid content, indicating that this polyphenolic acid would be among the main active molecules in these extracts. [less ▲]

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See detailGrasshoppers as a food source? A review
Paul, Aman ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2016), 20(AgricultureIsLife), 337-352

Description of the subject. Current trends suggest an increasing future demand for conventional meats, which indicates a strong need to shift this dependency to other alternative protein sources such as ... [more ▼]

Description of the subject. Current trends suggest an increasing future demand for conventional meats, which indicates a strong need to shift this dependency to other alternative protein sources such as insects. Literature. From a nutritional point of view, of all the insects consumed globally, grasshoppers are particularly important as a human food. Data from the literature regarding the nutrient composition, amino acid profile, fatty acid profile, mineral composition and vitamin content of grasshoppers as reviewed in this paper, suggest that a number of grasshopper species are a good source of nutrients. It also highlights some of the health related aspects that might arise from the consumption of grasshoppers, mostly linked to agricultural practices and the allergic response of sensitive individuals. The paper also summarizes some religious, social and economic factors that are associated with grasshopper consumption. Conclusions. The success of introducing grasshoppers as a novel food in western countries depends on changes in consumer attitudes. It would be interesting to develop food products derived from grasshoppers in a form acceptable to consumers. Furthermore, it is important to explore the food potential of some grasshopper species native to western countries and to develop their rearing methodologies to enhance availability. [less ▲]

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See detailPros and cons of flowers strips for farmers. A review
Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULg; Hatt, Séverin ULg; Paul, Aman ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2016), 20(s1), 225-235

Description of the subject. To counteract environmental problems due to agricultural intensification, European farmers can apply agri-environmental schemes in their fields. Flower strips are one example ... [more ▼]

Description of the subject. To counteract environmental problems due to agricultural intensification, European farmers can apply agri-environmental schemes in their fields. Flower strips are one example of these schemes, with the aim of supporting biodiversity, leading to an increase in “useful” species groups such as pollinators for crop pollination and natural enemies for pest control. However, to our knowledge, a complete appraisal of the pros and cons of flower strips, from a farmer’s point of view, does not yet exist. It is proposed that better and more complete information could increase the adoption and implementation of such agri-environmental schemes. Objectives. This study aims 1) to assess the pros and cons of flower strips, from a farmer’s point of view, and 2) to highlight the knowledge gaps that exist in the scientific literature, for the different types of pros and cons. Method. We listed the different components of the appraisal of pros and cons and conducted a systematic screening of the scientific literature on flower strips and these components. Results. The largest part of the 31 selected studies was concerning agronomical and ecological processes, such as pollination and animal pest control. Most of them indicated positive effects of flower strips. For many components of the appraisal, mostly economic and social ones, few or no studies were found. Conclusions. While a positive balance of pros and cons, from a farmer’s point of view, came from our literature screening, large research gaps still remain and more research is required, especially in the economic and social components of the evaluation. [less ▲]

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See detailAntioxidant potentiality of three herbal teas consumed in Bandundu rural areas of Congo.
Mutwale Kapepula, Paulin ULg; Mbombo Mungitshi, Patricia; Franck, Thierry ULg et al

in Natural Product Research (2016)

The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the cellular antioxidant activities of Lantana montevidensis, Lippia multiflora, and Ocimum gratissimum leaves often consumed as herbal teas in a rural ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the cellular antioxidant activities of Lantana montevidensis, Lippia multiflora, and Ocimum gratissimum leaves often consumed as herbal teas in a rural area of Bandundu severely affected by konzo, which is related to oxidative damage. Consequently, dietary supplements with proven antioxidant potentialities could be of real interest to promote in this area. Phytochemical screening by TLC and HPLC-DAD of extracts revealed the presence of verbascoside as a major phenolic compound. Verbascoside in L. montevidensis and O. gratissimum is reported here for the first time. All extracts displayed high ABTS and DPPH radical-scavenging activities at the concentration range of 1-40 mug mL-1 according to order: L. multiflora > O. gratissimum > L. montevidensis. L. multiflora showed the best cellular antioxidant activity using DCFH-DA on HL-60 monocytes assay at 1-20 mug mL-1. These herbal teas may be used as nutraceuticals for their potent antioxidant activity. [less ▲]

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See detailMetabolomics as a Challenging Approach for Medicinal Chemistry and Personalized Medicine.
Frederich, Michel ULg; Pirotte, Bernard ULg; Fillet, Marianne ULg et al

in Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2016), 59(19), 86498666

"Omics" sciences have been developed to provide a holistic point of view of biology and to better understand the complexity of an organism as a whole. These systems biology approaches can be examined at ... [more ▼]

"Omics" sciences have been developed to provide a holistic point of view of biology and to better understand the complexity of an organism as a whole. These systems biology approaches can be examined at different levels, starting from the most fundamental, i.e., the genome, and finishing with the most functional, i.e., the metabolome. Similar to how genomics is applied to the exploration of DNA, metabolomics is the qualitative and quantitative study of metabolites. This emerging field is clearly linked to genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics. In addition, metabolomics provides a unique and direct vision of the functional outcome of an organism's activities that are required for it to survive, grow, and respond to internal and external stimuli or stress, e.g., pathologies and drugs. The links between metabolic changes, patient phenotype, physiological and/or pathological status, and treatment are now well established and have opened a new area for the application of metabolomics in the drug discovery process and in personalized medicine. [less ▲]

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See detailPhenolic compounds from the roots of Ochna schweinfurthiana and their antioxidant and antiplasmodial activities
Messi, A. N.; Ngo Mbing, J.; Ndongo, J. T. et al

in Phytochemistry Letters (2016), 17

An investigation of compounds extracted from Ochna schweinfurthiana roots with ethyl acetate led to the isolation of three new compounds 4‴-methoxylophirone A (1), 4,4′,4‴–trimethoxylophirone A (2) and ... [more ▼]

An investigation of compounds extracted from Ochna schweinfurthiana roots with ethyl acetate led to the isolation of three new compounds 4‴-methoxylophirone A (1), 4,4′,4‴–trimethoxylophirone A (2) and (4E;7Z)-3,8-dicarboxy-1-(O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-2,9-dihydroxyhexeicosa-4,7-diene (3). Six known compounds were also identified, including Calodenone (4), Calodenine B (5), Lophirone A (6), Gerontoisoflavone A(7), 16α,17-dihydroxy-ent-kauran-19-oic acid (8) and 3β-O-D-glucopyranosyl-β-sitosterol (9). This report describes the first time that compounds 4-8 have been isolated from this plant, while 8 has never been identified in the genus Ochna. Some of the isolated compounds were evaluated for their antiplasmodial activity against the chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum strain 3D7 and antioxidant activity using DPPH radical scavenging and Ferric reducing-antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Compound 5 exhibited prominent radical scavenging and FRAP activities, while 7 had weak activity. Compound 1 showed good in vitro anti-plasmodial activity. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and comparisons with prior data in the literature. © 2016 Phytochemical Society of Europe [less ▲]

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See detailSphingolipids: promising lipid-class molecules with potential applications for industry. A review
Miazek, Krystian ULg; Lebecque, Simon ULg; Hamaïdia, Malik ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment (2016), (20(S1)), 321-336

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See detailBRYONIA ALBA L. AND ECBALLIUM ELATERIUM (L.) A. RICH. - TWO RELATED SPECIES OF THE CUCURBITACEAE FAMILY WITH IMPORTANT PHARMACEUTICAL POTENTIAL
Ielciu, Irina-Ioana ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg; Tits, Monique ULg et al

in Farmacia (2016), 64(3), 323-332

The importance of the Cucurbitaceae family consists not only in the species that are widely known for various economically important human uses, but also in the species that have proven an important and ... [more ▼]

The importance of the Cucurbitaceae family consists not only in the species that are widely known for various economically important human uses, but also in the species that have proven an important and promising potential concerning their biological activities. Bryonia alba L. and Ecballium elaterium (L.) A. Rich. are two species belonging to this family, that are known since ancient times for their homeopathic or traditional use in the treatment of numerous disorders. There is clear evidence that links between the two species are not only related to family morphological characters, but also to a certain degree to the sexual system and, most importantly, to the active principle content or to potential medicinal uses. All these elements helped to include both species in the same tribe and may result in important reasons for heading future studies towards the elucidation of their complete phytochemical composition and mechanisms of the biological activities. The present study aims to review the existing scientific literature on the two species and to offer sufficient evidence in order to justify a most detailed study of their pharmaceutical potential. [less ▲]

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See detailPHYTOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF FUMARIA OFFICINALIS L. (FUMARIACEAE)
Paltinean, Ramona; Toiu, Anca; Wauters, Jean-Noël ULg et al

in Farmacia (2016), 64(3), 409-413

The present study describes the investigation of active compounds from several samples of Fumaria officinalis L. (Fumariaceae). The identification of the isoquinoline alkaloids (allocryptopine ... [more ▼]

The present study describes the investigation of active compounds from several samples of Fumaria officinalis L. (Fumariaceae). The identification of the isoquinoline alkaloids (allocryptopine, chelidonine, protopine, bicuculline, sanguinarine, cheleritrine, stylopine and hydrastine) was performed by comparison with reference standards using an HPLC-DAD method, and their quantification by LC-DAD and spectrophotometric methods. The presence of polyphenolic compounds was simultaneously assessed by HPLC. Protopine and sanguinarine were identified in all extracts. The major alkaloids were protopine and chelidonine (258.3 mg/100 g and respectively 94.13 mg/100 g). The spectrophotometric determinations of alkaloids showed minor differences between commercial samples and those harvested from spontaneous flora. The concentration of isoquinoline alkaloids expressed in chelidonine was between 0.69 and 0.76% in all samples. The pattern of phenol carboxylic acids showed the presence of cynarin, chlorogenic, isochlorogenic and ferulic acids. The flavonoids isovitexin, rutin, isoquercitrin and quercitrin were found in all assessed samples of Fumaria officinalis aerial parts. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical constituents from Erythrina droogmansiana (Fabaceae), radical scavenging and antibacterial potential of some extracts and compounds
Talla, Emmanuel; Yaya Gbaweng, Joël; Mokale, Laurel et al

in Natural Products : An Indian Journal (2016), 12(1), 12-20

A new ceramide, droogmansiamide (1), was isolated from methanolic extract of roots wood of Erythrina droogmansiana, with eight known compounds namely 3-(3’,4’-methylenedioxyphenyl)-2,3-epoxypropanol (2 ... [more ▼]

A new ceramide, droogmansiamide (1), was isolated from methanolic extract of roots wood of Erythrina droogmansiana, with eight known compounds namely 3-(3’,4’-methylenedioxyphenyl)-2,3-epoxypropanol (2), erythrinasinate A (3), erythrinasinate B (4), abyssinone-IV-4'-methylether (5), erythrabyssin (6), phaseollidin (7), 4’-methoxylicoflavanone (8) and abyssinone-V-4'-methylether (9) respectively from methanolic extract of roots wood and EtOAc extract of roots bark of the same plant. Their structures were elucidated using spectroscopic methods (MS, NMR and IR) and by comparison with some data found in literature. Free radical scavenging (DPPH) and antibacterial potentials of extracts and compounds were also evaluated in this work. For radical scavenging, results showed that it is phaseollidin (7) which is responsible of radical scavenging potential in the ethyl acetate extract of roots barks with value of 1.31 mg/ml; for antibacterial, one of the tested compounds abyssinone-IV-4'-methylether (5) exhibited antibacterial activities against two strains: Providencia stuartiiATCC 29916 and Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048 with MIC values of 25μg/ml. [less ▲]

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See detailHPLC-DAD IDENTIFICATION OF SOME FLAVONOIDS FROM THE LEAVES AND AERIAL PARTS OF BRYONIA ALBA L. SPECIES SPONTANEOUS IN THE ROMANIAN FLORA
Ielciu, Irina-Ioana ULg; Păltinean, Ramona; Cieckiewicz, Ewa ULg et al

Poster (2015, October 14)

Bryonia alba L. is a climbing species, spontaneous in the Romanian flora, which can be found throughout the whole country [1]. It is known for its cytotoxic, analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory ... [more ▼]

Bryonia alba L. is a climbing species, spontaneous in the Romanian flora, which can be found throughout the whole country [1]. It is known for its cytotoxic, analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, anti-rheumatic, laxative-purgative and smooth muscle relaxant proprieties, being used both in traditional medicine and in homeopathy [2]. The main objective of this study consists in the evaluation of the flavonoid profile of this species. The vegetal material was harvested from the spontaneous flora of Cluj county (Romania). The vegetal extracts were obtained by ultrasonication, in methanol. Analysis of flavonoids was performed by a HPLC-DAD method and revealed mainly the presence of C-glycosides, of which saponarine was found as the main compound. Quantification of saponarin was also performed, using the HPLC method, on samples collected at different periods of time. Variation of the quantity of saponarine according to harvested samples was determined. Further analysis are under process in order to investigate the structure of these flavonoids and the pharmacological effects of the Bryonia alba L. plant extracts. References: 1. *** Flora Europea, vol. 2, Cambridge, Univ. Press. Cambridge London-New York Melbourne, 1979, p. 298-299 2. Demarque D, Jouanny J, Poitevin B, Saint Jean Y. Pharmacologie et matière médicale homéopathique, 3ième edition, France, CEDH, 2007. [less ▲]

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See detailMedicinal plants, malaria and biotechnology
Frederich, Michel ULg; Jansen, Olivia ULg; Muganga, Raymond et al

Conference (2015, September 24)

The first part of the talk will be dedicated to the investigation of medicinal plants with the objective to identify new antimalarial treatments. According to the last World Malaria Report [1], there were ... [more ▼]

The first part of the talk will be dedicated to the investigation of medicinal plants with the objective to identify new antimalarial treatments. According to the last World Malaria Report [1], there were 584 000 deaths for 198 millions malaria cases worldwide in 2013. Particularly, the disease caused an estimated 437 000 African children died before their fifth birthday, still in 2013. Malaria is caused by a parasite, Plasmodium sp. and transmitted by Anopheles mosquitoes. The problem of parasite resistance towards common available medicines such as chloroquine, mefloquine, quinine, is increasing. In this context, the vegetal kingdom remains the main source of pharmacologically active compounds against this parasitic infection as attested by the famous quinine, isolated from Cinchona sp., artemisinin extracted from Artemisia annua and also atovaquone derived from lapachol found in several Bignoniaceae. All these substances are related to plants with traditional use against fever and malaria. Beside these well-known examples, various new antiplasmodial compounds are frequently discovered from Nature, particularly following an ethnopharmacological approach, as reviewed by several authors in recent years [2-6]. Then, the pharmacological and phytochemical study of plants from traditional pharmacopoeias can be of first interest not only to discover new antimalarial “lead compounds”, but also to valorize local vegetal species whose efficacy and safety would have been demonstrated in laboratory and by clinical investigations [7,8]. Some results obtained with Dicoma tomentosa from Burkina-Faso [9] and Terminalia mollis from Rwanda [10] will be presented. In the second part of the talk, two applications of biotechnology for the production of artemisinin and paclitaxel and then some works developed at the ‘Université de la Réunion’ will be presented. In the framework of this collaboration, Psiadia arguta, an endemic plant from Reunion Island, which is known to have cytotoxic, anti-plasmodial and anti-inflammatory properties, was subjected to micropropagation. The objective of the work was to compare the biological properties and the phytochemical composition of callus, vitroplants and acclimatized plants of Psiadia arguta [11]. 1. WHO, World Malaria Report 2014, December 2014, Geneva (http://www.who.int/malaria/publications/world_malaria_report_2014/en/). 2. Batista R, Silva Ade J Jr, de Oliveira AB: Plant-derived antimalarial agents: new leads and efficient phytomedicines. Part II. Non-alkaloidal natural products. Molecules 2009, 14:3037-72. 3. Bero J, Frédérich M, Quetin-Leclercq J : Antimalarial compounds isolated from plants used in traditional medicine. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology 2009, 61:1401–1433. 4. Bero J and Quetin-Leclercq J: Natural products published in 2009 from plants traditionally used to treat malaria. Planta Medica 2011, 77:631-40. 5. Kaur K, Jain M, Kaur T, Jain R: Antimalarials from nature. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry 2009, 17:3229–3256. 6. Nogueira CR and Lopes LMX: Antiplasmodial Natural Products. Molecules 2011, 16:2146-2190 7. Ginsburg H and Deharo E: A call for using natural compounds in the development of new antimalarial treatments – an introduction. Malaria Journal 2011, 10 (suppl. 1):S1 8. Willcox M, Graz B, Falquet J, Diakite C, Giani S, Diallo D: A “reverse pharmacology” approach for developing an antimalarial phytomedicine. Malaria journal 2011, 10(suppl1):S8 9. Jansen, O., Tits, M., Angenot, L., Nicolas, J.-P., De Mol, P., Nikiema, J.-B., & Frédérich, M : Anti-plasmodial activity of Dicoma tomentosa (Asteraceae) and identification of urospermal A-15-O-acetate as the main active compound. Malaria Journal 2012, 11, 289. 10. Muganga, R., Angenot, L., Tits, M., & Frédérich, M : In vitro and in vivo antiplasmodial activity of three Rwandan medicinal plants and identification of their active compounds. Planta Medica 2013, 80(6), 482-489. 11. Mahy Justine, Comparative study of biological activities and analysis of volatile compounds of Psiadia arguta in various cultures: vitroplants and acclimatized plants. Mémoire de M2, 2013, Université de Liège/Université de la Réunion. [less ▲]

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See detailEthnopharmacologie et développement de nouveaux médicaments d’origine naturelle
Frederich, Michel ULg; Jansen, Olivia ULg

Scientific conference (2015, September 01)

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See detailIsolation and identification of potential antimalarial compounds from endemic plants of Reunion Island
Bordignon, Annélise ULg; Cieckiewicz, Ewa ULg; Jansen, Olivia ULg et al

Poster (2015, July 16)

Malaria is known as the most important parasitic disease around the world with 584 000 malaria deaths worldwide in 2013 [1]. Due to the problem of increased parasite resistance, natural products from ... [more ▼]

Malaria is known as the most important parasitic disease around the world with 584 000 malaria deaths worldwide in 2013 [1]. Due to the problem of increased parasite resistance, natural products from endemic plants of Reunion Island, hot spot of promising biodiversity, could represent an important source of new antimalarial drugs. The aim of this thesis research focuses on the evaluation of potential antiplasmodial activity of medicinal plants from Reunion Island. A global screening of plants extracts from Reunion Island was performed on Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 chloroquine-sensitive strain revealed by colorimetric method as described in previous reports [2]. Monimia rotundifolia was then selected due to its promising in vitro activity against Plasmodium. Bioguided fractionation was realized using Prep HPLC techniques and led to the isolation of aporphine-type alkaloids from Monimia rotundifolia leaves dichloromethane extract. Further investigations are in process to confirm the antiplasmodial activities of these alkaloids and to determine their structures. References: [1] WHO, World Malaria report 2014. [2] Jansen O. et al., Evaluation of 13 selected medicinal plants from Burkina Faso for their antiplasmodial properties. J Ethnopharmacol 2010, 130:143-150. [less ▲]

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See detailMetabolomics analysis of Galium odoratum (L.) Scop.: impact of the plant population origin and growth conditions.
Ledoux, Allison ULg; Martin, Bertrand; De Tullio, Pascal ULg et al

Poster (2015, July 16)

Galium odoratum is a plant used in traditional medicine and to prepare beverages. This work aimed at studying the impact of plant origin and growth conditions on the metabolite content of the plant ... [more ▼]

Galium odoratum is a plant used in traditional medicine and to prepare beverages. This work aimed at studying the impact of plant origin and growth conditions on the metabolite content of the plant. Material and methods- Aerial biomass of Galium odoratum was collected from five natural populations (in situ conditions) and from controlled environment (ex situ conditions). Results- Quantitative analysis of selected phytochemicals including phenylpropranoids and iridoids showed clear differences between the plants from nature and those of controlled growth conditions as well as internal variation within the group. The metabolomic approach emphasized the decrease of the secondary metabolites pool paralleled by an increase of the carbohydrates in ex situ conditions. Conclusion- Metabolomics approaches using 1H-NMR and HPLC is worth to consider for studying the impact of climate factors on the regulation of the phytochemical profile in relation to the origin of the plant material. [less ▲]

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See detailEthnopharmacology and malaria in Africa
Frederich, Michel ULg; Jansen, Olivia ULg; Muganga, raymond et al

Conference (2015, July 12)

According to the last World Malaria Report [1], there were 584 000 deaths for 198 millions malaria cases worldwide in 2013. Particularly, the disease caused an estimated 437 000 African children died ... [more ▼]

According to the last World Malaria Report [1], there were 584 000 deaths for 198 millions malaria cases worldwide in 2013. Particularly, the disease caused an estimated 437 000 African children died before their fifth birthday, still in 2013. Malaria is caused by a parasite, Plasmodium sp. and transmitted by Anopheles mosquitoes. The problem of parasite resistance towards common available medicines such as chloroquine, mefloquine, quinine, is increasing. In this context, the vegetal kingdom remains the main source of pharmacologically active compounds against this parasitic infection as attested by the famous quinine, isolated from Cinchona sp., artemisinin extracted from Artemisia annua and also atovaquone derived from lapachol found in several Bignoniaceae. All these substances are related to plants with traditional use against fever and malaria. Beside these well-known examples, various new antiplasmodial compounds are frequently discovered from Nature, particularly following an ethnopharmacological approach, as reviewed by several authors in recent years [2-6]. Then, the pharmacological and phytochemical study of plants from traditional pharmacopoeias can be of first interest not only to discover new antimalarial “lead compounds”, but also to valorize local vegetal species whose efficacy and safety would have been demonstrated in laboratory and clinical investigations [7]. As demonstrated in several works from Willcox [8], better knowledge of plants from traditional pharmacopoeias and local valorization of validated traditional remedies in Improved Traditional Medicine (ITM) could allow the access to effective, standardized, available and affordable therapeutics for management of malaria by local populations. After this introductive section, the second part of the talk will be dedicated to the presentation of some results obtained in Liège with Dicoma tomentosa from Burkina-Faso [9], Strychnos icaja from Cameroun [10] and Terminalia mollis from Rwanda [11]. 1. WHO, World Malaria Report 2014, December 2014, Geneva (http://www.who.int/malaria/publications/world_malaria_report_2014/en/). 2. Batista R, Silva Ade J Jr, de Oliveira AB: Plant-derived antimalarial agents: new leads and efficient phytomedicines. Part II. Non-alkaloidal natural products. Molecules 2009, 14:3037-72. 3. Bero J, Frédérich M, Quetin-Leclercq J : Antimalarial compounds isolated from plants used in traditional medicine. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology 2009, 61:1401–1433. 4. Bero J and Quetin-Leclercq J: Natural products published in 2009 from plants traditionally used to treat malaria. Planta Medica 2011, 77:631-40. 5. Kaur K, Jain M, Kaur T, Jain R: Antimalarials from nature. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry 2009, 17:3229–3256. 6. Nogueira CR and Lopes LMX: Antiplasmodial Natural Products. Molecules 2011, 16:2146-2190 7. Ginsburg H and Deharo E: A call for using natural compounds in the development of new antimalarial treatments – an introduction. Malaria Journal 2011, 10 (suppl. 1):S1 8. Willcox M, Graz B, Falquet J, Diakite C, Giani S, Diallo D: A “reverse pharmacology” approach for developing an antimalarial phytomedicine. Malaria journal 2011, 10(suppl1):S8 9. Jansen, O., Tits, M., Angenot, L., Nicolas, J.-P., De Mol, P., Nikiema, J.-B., & Frédérich, M : Anti-plasmodial activity of Dicoma tomentosa (Asteraceae) and identification of urospermal A-15-O-acetate as the main active compound. Malaria Journal 2012, 11, 289. 10. Tchinda, A. T., Jansen, O., Nyemb, J.-N., Tits, M., Dive, G., Angenot, L., & Frédérich, M. Strychnobaillonine, an unsymmetrical bisindole alkaloid with an unprecedented skeleton from Strychnos icaja roots. Journal of Natural Products 2014, 77(4), 1078–82. 11. Muganga, R., Angenot, L., Tits, M., & Frédérich, M : In vitro and in vivo antiplasmodial activity of three Rwandan medicinal plants and identification of their active compounds. Planta Medica 2013, 80(6), 482-489. [less ▲]

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See detailScreening of medicinal plants from Reunion Island for antimalarial activity
Ledoux, Allison ULg; Bordignon, Annélise ULg; Campos, Pierre-Éric et al

Poster (2015, July)

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