References of "Willems, Jacqueline"
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See detailOral contraception and lipid peroxidation
De Groote, D.; Pincemail, Joël ULg; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier ULg et al

in Clinical Chemistry (2007, June), 53(6, Suppl. S), 30-30

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See detailF-18-FDG PET imaging of rheumatoid knee synovitis correlates with dynamic magnetic resonance and sonographic assessments as well as with the serum level of metalloproteinase-3
Beckers, Catherine ULg; Jeukens, Xavier; Ribbens, Clio ULg et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2006), 33(3), 275-280

Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovitis with positron emission tomography (PET) and F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) in comparison with dynamic magnetic ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovitis with positron emission tomography (PET) and F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) in comparison with dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US). Methods: Sixteen knees in 16 patients with active RA were assessed with PET, MRI and US at baseline and 4 weeks after initiation of anti-TNF-alpha treatment. All studies were performed within 4 days. Visual and semi-quantitative (standardised uptake value, SUV) analyses of the synovial uptake of FDG were performed. The dynamic enhancement rate and the static enhancement were measured after i.v. gadolinium injection and the synovial thickness was measured in the medial, lateral patellar and suprapatellar recesses by US. Serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) were also measured. Results: PET was positive in 69% of knees while MRI and US were positive in 69% and 75%. Positivity on one imaging technique was strongly associated with positivity on the other two. PET-positive knees exhibited significantly higher SUVs, higher MRI parameters and greater synovial thickness compared with PET-negative knees, whereas serum CRP and MMP-3 levels were not significantly different. SUVs were significantly correlated with all MRI parameters, with synovial thickness and with serum CRP and MMP-3 levels at baseline. Changes in SUVs after 4 weeks were also correlated with changes in MRI parameters and in serum CRP and MMP-3 levels, but not with changes in synovial thickness. Conclusion: F-18-FDG PET is a unique imaging technique for assessing the metabolic activity of synovitis. The PET findings are correlated with MRI and US assessments of the pannus in RA, as well as with the classical serum parameter of inflammation, CRP, and the synovium-derived parameter, serum MMP-3. Further studies are warranted to establish the place of metabolic imaging of synovitis in RA. [less ▲]

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See detailF-18-FDG PET in children with lymphomas
Depas, Gisèle ULg; De Barsy, Caroline; Jerusalem, Guy ULg et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2005), 32(1), 31-38

Purpose: The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) in children with lymphomas, at various stages ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) in children with lymphomas, at various stages of their disease. Methods: Twenty-eight children (mean age 12.5 years, 14 girls, 14 boys) with Hodgkin's disease (HD, n=17) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, n= 11) were evaluated. Patients were investigated at initial staging (n=19), early in the course of treatment (n=19), at the end of treatment (n=16) and during long-term follow-up (n=19). A total of 113 whole-body PET studies were performed on dedicated scanners. PET results were compared with the results of conventional methods (CMs) such as physical examination, laboratory studies, chest X-rays, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography and bone scan when available. Results: At initial evaluation (group 1), PET changed the disease stage and treatment in 10.5% of the cases. In early evaluation of the response to treatment (group 2), PET failed to predict two relapses and one incomplete response to treatment. In this group, however, PET did not show any false positive results. There were only 4/75 false positive results for PET among patients studied at the end of treatment (group 3, specificity 94%) or during the systematic follow-up (group 4, specificity 95%), as compared with 27/75 for CMs (specificity 54% and 66%, respectively). Conclusion: F-18-FDG-PET is a useful tool for evaluating children with lymphomas. Large prospective studies are needed to appreciate its real impact on patient management. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis with 18F-FDG PET
Beckers, Catherine ULg; Ribbens, Clio ULg; Andre, Béatrice ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (2004), 45(6), 956-964

The aim of this study was to assess synovitis by F-18-FDG PET in an individual joint analysis and in a global analysis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity and to compare F-18-FDG PET parameters ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to assess synovitis by F-18-FDG PET in an individual joint analysis and in a global analysis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity and to compare F-18-FDG PET parameters with clinical, biologic, and sonographic (US) rheumatoid parameters. Methods: Three hundred fifty-six joints were assessed in 21 patients with active RA: the knees in all subjects and either wrists as well as metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints in 13 patients, or ankles and the first metatarsophalangeal joints in the remaining 8 patients. PET analysis consisted of a visual identification of F-18-FDG uptake in the synovium and measurements of standardized uptake values (SUVs). Independent assessors performed the clinical and US examinations. Results: PET positivity was found in 63% of joints, whereas 75%, 79%, and 56% were positive for swelling, tenderness, and US analysis, respectively. Both the rate of PET-positive joints and the SUV increased with the number of positive parameters present (swelling, tenderness, US positivity) and with the synovial thickness. The mean SUV was significantly higher in joints where a power Doppler signal was found. In a global PET analysis, the number of PET-positive joints and the cumulative SUV were significantly correlated with the swollen and tender joint counts, the patient and physician global assessments, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein serum levels, the disease activity score and the simplified disease activity index, the number of US-positive joints, and the cumulative synovial thickness. Conclusion: F-18-FDG PET is a unique imaging technique that can assess the metabolic activity of synovitis and measure the disease activity in RA. [less ▲]

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See detailWithin-patient variability of F-18-FDG: Standardized uptake values in normal tissues
Paquet, Nancy; Albert, Adelin ULg; Willems, Jacqueline ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (2004), 45(5), 784-788

The aim of this study was to evaluate the test-retest variability of standardized uptake values (SUVs) in normal tissues and the impact of various methods for measuring the SUV. Methods: SUVs were ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the test-retest variability of standardized uptake values (SUVs) in normal tissues and the impact of various methods for measuring the SUV. Methods: SUVs were determined in 70 cancer-free patients (40 female and 30 male) on 2 occasions an average of 271 d apart. Mean values for body weight and height, blood glucose level, injected dose, and uptake period did not change between the 2 groups of studies. Four regions of interest (ROIs) were placed-on the liver, lung, mediastinum, and trapezius muscle. Mean and maximum SUVs normalized for body weight were obtained, and normalizations were then applied for lean body mass (LBM), LBM and blood glucose level, body surface area (BSA), and BSA and blood glucose level. Results: In the lungs and muscle, metabolic activity within the ROIs was significantly different in the 2 studies, no matter which method was used for the SUVs. The differences ranged from 0.02 to 0.1 for SUV normalized for body weight and SUV normalized for LBM and from 0.001 to 0.002 for SUV normalized for BSA. In the liver, results were similar for all SUVs, except for maximum SUV corrected for LBM and maximum SUV corrected for LBM and blood glucose level. The metabolic activity measured in the mediastinum was also comparable in the 2 studies, regardless of the type of SUV. When investigating whether any normalization method for SUVs reduces variability and improves test-retest concordance, we found no significant superiority for any. The best intraclass correlation coefficients were obtained with the SUV normalized for body weight, in both the liver and the mediastinum, but the coefficients of variation were similar for all 3 mean SUVs that were not corrected for glucose level (range, 10.8%-13.4%). However, normalizing for blood glucose level increased the variability and decreased the level of concordance between studies. Conclusion: The SUVs measured in normal liver and mediastinum in cancer-free patients are stable over time, no matter which normalization is used. Correcting for blood glucose level increases the variability of the values and should therefore be avoided. Normalizing for BSA or LBM does not improve the reproducibility of the measurements. [less ▲]

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See detailFluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy for diagnosing and staging carcinoid tumours: correlations with the pathological indexes p53 and Ki-67
Belhocine, Tarik; Willems, Jacqueline ULg; Rigo, Pierre ULg et al

in Nuclear Medicine Communications (2002), 23(8), 727-734

We performed this study in order to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) for ... [more ▼]

We performed this study in order to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) for localizing primary carcinoid tumours and evaluating the extent of the disease. A secondary aim was to correlate those findings with the histological characteristics of the lesions. FDG PET was performed in 17 patients and SRS in 16. All patients had pathologically proven carcinoids. All lesions were verified by histopathological analysis or by follow-up. Ki-67 and p53 expression were assessed as an indicator of the tumours' aggressiveness. FDG PET correctly identified 4/7 primary tumours and 8/11 metastatic spreads, as compared to six and 10 respectively, for SRS. Most tumours were typical carcinoids with low Ki-67 expression. No correlation was found between the histological features and the tracer's uptake. We conclude that SRS remains the modality of choice for evaluating patients with carcinoid tumours, regardless of their proliferative activity. FDG PET should be reserved to patients with negative results on SRS. ((C) 2002 Lippincott Williams Wilkins). [less ▲]

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See detailClinical PET in Oncology
Rigo, Pierre ULg; Paulus, Patrick; Bury, Thierry ULg et al

in Bergmann, H.; Kroiss, A.; Sinzinger H (Eds.) Radioactive Isotopes in Clinical Medicine and Research (1997)

18-FDG is accumulated in cancer cells. It has been proven useful to image a variety of tumors in conjunction with whole-body positron emission tomography. This review details somes of the indications of ... [more ▼]

18-FDG is accumulated in cancer cells. It has been proven useful to image a variety of tumors in conjunction with whole-body positron emission tomography. This review details somes of the indications of PET at various stages of the cancerous process : differential diagnosis, preoperative staging, diagnosis of residual or recurrent disease as well as follow-up of therapy. Consideration of several potential improvements in clinical PET and of the need for careful patients selection conclude this review. [less ▲]

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