References of "Verlaet, Myriam"
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See detailCyclo-oxygenase type 2-dependent prostaglandin E-2 secretion is involved in retrovirus-induced T-cell dysfunction in mice
Rahmouni, Souad ULg; Aandahl, Einar Martin; Nayjib, Btissam ULg et al

in Biochemical Journal (2004), 384(Pt 3), 469-476

MAIDS (murine AIDS) is caused by infection with the murine leukaemia retrovirus RadLV-Rs and is characterized by a severe immunodeficiency and T-cell anergy combined with a lymphoproliferative disease ... [more ▼]

MAIDS (murine AIDS) is caused by infection with the murine leukaemia retrovirus RadLV-Rs and is characterized by a severe immunodeficiency and T-cell anergy combined with a lymphoproliferative disease affecting both B- and T-cells. Hyperactivation of the cAMP-protein kinase A pathway is involved in the T-cell dysfunction of MAIDS and HIV by inhibiting T-cell activation through the T-cell receptor. In the present study, we show that MAIDS involves a strong and selective up-regulation of cyclo-oxygenase type 2 in the CD11b+ subpopulation of T- and B-cells of the lymph nodes, leading to increased levels of PGE2 (prostaglandin E2). PGE2 activates the cAMP pathway through G-protein-coupled receptors. Treatment with cyclo-oxygenase type 2 inhibitors reduces the level of PGE2 and thereby reverses the T-cell anergy, restores the T-cell immune function and ameliorates the lymphoproliferative disease. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuronal localization of the 25-kDa specific thiamine triphosphatase in rodent brain
Czerniecki, Jan ULg; Chanas, Grazyna; Verlaet, Myriam ULg et al

in Neuroscience (2004), 125(4), 833-840

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in small amounts in most organisms from bacteria to mammals, but little is known about its physiological role. In vertebrate tissues, ThTP may act as a phosphate ... [more ▼]

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in small amounts in most organisms from bacteria to mammals, but little is known about its physiological role. In vertebrate tissues, ThTP may act as a phosphate donor for the phosphorylation of certain proteins; this may be part of a new signal transduction pathway. We have recently characterized a highly specific 25-kDa thiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase) that is expressed in most mammalian tissues. The role of this enzyme may be the control of intracellular concentrations of ThTP. As the latter has been considered to be a neuroactive form of thiamine, we have studied the distribution of ThTPase mRNA and protein in rodent brain using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. With both methods, we found the strongest staining in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, as well as cerebellar granule cells and Purkinje cells. Some interneurons were also labeled and many ThTPase mRNA-positive and immunoreactive cells were distributed throughout cerebral cortical gray matter and the thalamus. White matter was not significantly labeled. ThTPase immunoreactivity seems to be located mainly in the cytoplasm of neuronal perikarya. Immunocytochemical data using dissociated cultured cells from hippocampal and cerebellum showed that the staining was more intense in neurons than in astrocytes. The protein was rather uniformly located in the perikarya and dendrites, suggesting that ThTP and ThTPase may play a general role in neuronal metabolism rather than a specific role in excitability. There was no apparent correlation between ThTPase expression and selective vulnerability of certain brain regions to thiamine deficiency. (C) 2004 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of 25 kDa thiamine triphosphatase in rodent tissues using quantitative PCR and characterization of its mRNA
Lakaye, Bernard ULg; Verlaet, Myriam ULg; Dubail, Johanne ULg et al

in International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology (2004), 36(10), 2032-2041

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in most organisms, but its biological role remains unclear. In mammalian tissues, cellular ThTP concentrations remain low, probably because of hydrolysis by a ... [more ▼]

Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in most organisms, but its biological role remains unclear. In mammalian tissues, cellular ThTP concentrations remain low, probably because of hydrolysis by a specific 25 kDa thiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase). The aim of the present study was to use quantitative PCR, for comparing the 25 kDa ThTPase mRNA expression in various mouse tissues with its enzyme activities. ThTPase mRNA was expressed at only a few copies per cell. The highest amount of mRNA was found in testis, followed by lung and muscle, while the highest enzyme activities were found in liver and kidney. The poor correlation between mRNA levels and enzyme activities might result either from tissue-specific post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA processing and/or translation or from the regulation of enzyme activities by post-translational mechanisms. Purified recombinant human ThTPase was phosphorylated by casein kinase 11, but this phosphorylation did not modify the enzyme activity. However, the characterization of the 3'-untranslated mRNA region revealed a unique, highly conserved, 200-nucleotide sequence that might be involved in translational control. In situ hybridization studies in testis suggest a predominant localization of ThTPase mRNA in poorly differentiated spermatogenic cells. This is the first study demonstrating a cell-specific 25 kDa ThTPase mRNA expression, suggesting that this enzyme might be related to the degree of differentiation or the metabolic state of the cell. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman immune cells express ppMCH mRNA and functional MCHR1 receptor
Verlaet, Myriam ULg; Adamantidis, Antoine ULg; Coumans, Bernard ULg et al

in FEBS Letters (2002), 527(1-3), 205-210

Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is highly expressed in the brain and modulates feeding behavior. It is also expressed in some peripheral tissues where its role remains unknown. We have investigated ... [more ▼]

Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is highly expressed in the brain and modulates feeding behavior. It is also expressed in some peripheral tissues where its role remains unknown. We have investigated MCH function in human and mouse immune cells. RT-PCR analysis revealed a low expression of prepro-MCH and MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) but not of MCHR2 transcript in tissular and peripheral blood immune cells. FACS and in vitro assay studies demonstrated that MCHR1 receptor expression on most cell types can trigger, in the presence of MCH, cAMP synthesis and calcium mobilization in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Moreover, MCH treatment decreases the CD3-stimulated PBMC proliferation in vitro. Accordingly, our data indicate for the first time that MCH and MCHR1 may exert immunomodulatory functions. (C) 2002 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailTransient modifications of respiratory capacity in thymic cells during murine radioleukemogenesis
Verlaet, Myriam ULg; Duyckaerts, Claire ULg; Rahmouni, Souad ULg et al

in Free Radical Biology & Medicine (2002), 33(1), 76-82

The evolution of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation was studied during cancer induction in a model of thymic radiolymphomagenesis in C57BL/Ka mice. During the preneoplastic period, thymuses displayed ... [more ▼]

The evolution of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation was studied during cancer induction in a model of thymic radiolymphomagenesis in C57BL/Ka mice. During the preneoplastic period, thymuses displayed an increase of the cytochrome c oxidase activity and oxygen consumption together with oxidative DNA damage assessed by the presence of the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanine DNA base modification. These transient changes in mitochondrial functional activity were not observed in thymuses of mice rescued from lymphoma development by a bone marrow graft, suggesting an important role of mitochondria for neoplastic transformation in this model. which might therefore be of interest to test the utilization of antioxidants for the prevention of radiation-induced malignancies. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic Imbalances in Preleukemic Thymuses
Verlaet, Myriam ULg; Deregowski, Valérie; Denis, Ghislaine et al

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (2001), 283(1), 12-8

To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in preleukemia, the suppression subtractive hybridization method was used in a murine radiation-induced thymic lymphoma model. Seventeen mRNAs overexpressed ... [more ▼]

To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in preleukemia, the suppression subtractive hybridization method was used in a murine radiation-induced thymic lymphoma model. Seventeen mRNAs overexpressed in preleukemic thymuses were identified: mouse laminin binding protein (p40/37LBP), E25 protein, Rattus norvegicus clone BB.1.4.1, profilin, poly(A) binding protein (PABP), mouse high mobility group protein 1, topoisomerase I, clusterin, proteasome RC1 subunit, rat prostatein C3 and C1 subunits; two ESTs and four unknown genes. The overexpression of PABP, clusterin, profilin, and the p40/37LBP mRNAs was confirmed in preleukemic thymuses and can be related to some cellular events observed during the preleukemic period, i.e., alterations of cell cycle and apoptosis properties. The p40/37LBP and 67-kDa laminin receptor proteins were upregulated during the preleukemic period. The data suggest that additional studies on p40/37LBP and 67-kDa laminin receptor regulation are required to evaluate their potential role in the lymphoma prevention by TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of Cytokines in Human Sural Nerve Biopsies: An Immunohistochemical and Molecular Study
Deprez, Manuel ULg; Lübke, U.; Verlaet, Myriam ULg et al

in Acta Neuropathologica (2001), 101(4), 393-404

In vitro and in vivo models have implicated numerous cytokines as major modulators of inflammation, destruction and repair in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The in situ production of cytokines in ... [more ▼]

In vitro and in vivo models have implicated numerous cytokines as major modulators of inflammation, destruction and repair in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The in situ production of cytokines in human peripheral nerve disorders is still poorly documented. We studied the expression of interleukin (IL)-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-6, IL-10, IL-4, IL-3 and nerve growth factor (NGF) in 35 human sural nerve biopsies using immunohistochemistry; additional reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and mRNA in situ hybridization were performed for IL-4 and NGF. Expression of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha was shown in both morphologically normal nerves and various neuropathies, and macrophages appeared as their predominant source. Levels of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha expression were significantly correlated (P < 0.01) with each other and with expression of NGF. Multiple endoneurial sources were suggested for IL-6 and IL-10 with low immunoreactivity in the vast majority of cases. Conversely, IL-4 and IL-3 expression were found in neuropathies of various etiologies and Schwann cells appeared to be a predominant source of IL-4 in double-labeling immunofluorescence studies. IL-3 immunoreactivity correlated with IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha and IL-6. In this retrospective study, no specific cytokine profile of expression could be assigned to a precise subgroup of neuropathies. This is the first report of IL-4 and IL-3 expression in human neuropathies, and it may be important given the potential role of these cytokines in modulating macrophage activity in the PNS. [less ▲]

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See detailRoles of Nuclear Factor-Kappab, P53, and P21/Waf1 in Daunomycin-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis
Hellin, A. C.; Bentires-Alj, M.; Verlaet, Myriam ULg et al

in Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (The) (2000), 295(3), 870-8

Daunomycin is a potent inducer of p53 and NF-kappaB transcription factors. It is also able to increase the amount of the p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. The human p21 promoter harbors p53 ... [more ▼]

Daunomycin is a potent inducer of p53 and NF-kappaB transcription factors. It is also able to increase the amount of the p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. The human p21 promoter harbors p53-responsive elements and an NF-kappaB binding site. [less ▲]

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See detailNuclear Localization of a New C-Cbl Related Protein, Carp 90, During in Vivo Thymic Apoptosis in Mice
Denis, Ghislaine; Mandard, S.; Verlaet, Myriam ULg et al

in Cell Death & Differentiation (1999), 6(7), 689-97

This study investigates the involvement of the c-cbl protooncogene in thymocyte apoptosis occurring in vivo after hydrocortisone treatment. In the thymus of untreated mice, a few medullary and cortical ... [more ▼]

This study investigates the involvement of the c-cbl protooncogene in thymocyte apoptosis occurring in vivo after hydrocortisone treatment. In the thymus of untreated mice, a few medullary and cortical thymocytes expressed p120cbl, mainly in the cytoplasm. In the cortex, their number and distribution resemble that of apoptotic cells evidenced by TUNEL staining. The expression of Cbl is rapidly increased when apoptosis is triggered by hydrocortisone. This Cbl-specific immunostaining was detected in the nucleus and is due to a Cbl-related 90 kDa protein (CARP 90). These results show that a c-cbl product could localize in the nucleus and suggest that it could be involved as a regulator of thymic apoptosis. [less ▲]

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See detailP53, Bax and Bcl-2 in Vivo Expression in the Murine Thymus after Apoptogenic Treatments
Denis, Ghislaine; Humblet, Chantal ULg; Verlaet, Myriam ULg et al

in Anticancer Research (1998), 18(5, Sep-Oct), 3315-21

BACKGROUND: Neoplasia can results from a lack of cell elimination by apoptosis. In order to determine if mechanisms controlling apoptosis are disturbed during neoplastic transformation in a model of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Neoplasia can results from a lack of cell elimination by apoptosis. In order to determine if mechanisms controlling apoptosis are disturbed during neoplastic transformation in a model of murine radio-induced thymic lymphomas, we have assessed the kinetics of p53, Bax and Bcl-2 in situ expression after induction of thymic apoptosis by irradiation or glucocorticoids at first in normal mice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: TUNEL method was used for in situ detection of apoptosis and protein expression was determined by indirect immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: After hydrocortisone injection, levels of p53 and Bax, but not Bcl-2, expression were raised. A whole body sublethal irradiation led to an increase of p53 and Bcl-2, but not Bax, expression. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first in vivo report of in situ protein expression in the thymus after apoptogenic treatments of mice. The results suggest that Bax could be involved in glucocorticoid-mediated apoptosis. The increased levels of Bcl-2 expression are discussed. [less ▲]

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