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See detailAssessing the foraging behavior of Agriotes sordidus wireworms in dual-choice olfactometers
Barsics, Fanny ULg; Fiers, Marie; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (in press)

The different steps of the foraging process of wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae) would be better understood if accurate and holistic information regarding the role of plant-produced chemicals ... [more ▼]

The different steps of the foraging process of wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae) would be better understood if accurate and holistic information regarding the role of plant-produced chemicals constituting their environment were available. Volatile organic compounds (VOC) play important roles in the interactions between plants and insects in many ecosystems, whether they take place aboveground or belowground. The roles of VOC are still relatively unknown for wireworms, and deserve attention. Here, we performed three experimentations with barley roots as baits. In the two first, we assessed the effect of chopped roots and fungus infected roots on the orientation of wireworms. In the third experiment, the larvae were confronted to both healthy and fungus infected roots. We discuss the results in terms of suitability of the olfactometers we designed for the investigation of olfaction in wireworms, and we provide suggestions to improve their use. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of olfaction in wireworms: a review on foraging behavior and sensory apparatus
Barsics, Fanny ULg; Haubruge, Eric ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (in press)

Introduction Integrated management of wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae) depends upon approaches applied both above- and belowground, and over several spatial scales. While foraging, these soil pests use ... [more ▼]

Introduction Integrated management of wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae) depends upon approaches applied both above- and belowground, and over several spatial scales. While foraging, these soil pests use biotic and abiotic signals to orientate towards target plant organs. Development of efficient techniques for implementation in integrated strategies relies upon improved knowledge of this process. In particular, an important step consists of elucidating the role of volatile organic compounds (VOC), emitted by belowground plant organs, in wireworm chemical ecology. This would have a positive impact on push-pull strategies and varietal selection developed against these insects. Literature In this work, we summarized the available data regarding wireworm foraging behavior as well as variables that should be considered when studying the potential role of plant-produced volatile semiochemicals. This includes CO2 gradients and other host-related cues, temperature, relative humidity and soil moisture, and wireworm physiological stage. We also review what is known of the sensory apparatus of wireworms, since this is involved in every step of the foraging process. Conclusion Some baseline data for studying VOC related wireworm foraging behavior exists. Using it as a tool in applied entomology should result in discovery of the semiochemicals that underpin trophic interactions involving these pests. However, most of the key pest species are not fully described with regards to the parameters detailed here. Obtaining accurate information to fill the current knowledge gaps will be needed in order to devise new integrated management strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailDo aphids actively search for ant partners?
Fischer, Christophe ULg; Vanderplanck, Maryse; Lognay, Georges ULg et al

in Insect Science (in press)

The aphid–ant mutualistic relationships are not necessarily obligate for neither partners but evidence is that such interactions provide them strong advantages in terms of global fitness. While it is ... [more ▼]

The aphid–ant mutualistic relationships are not necessarily obligate for neither partners but evidence is that such interactions provide them strong advantages in terms of global fitness. While it is largely assumed that ants actively search for their mutualistic partners namely using volatile cues; whether winged aphids (i.e. aphids’ most mobile form) are able to select ant-frequented areas had not been investigated so far. Ant-frequented sites would indeed offer several advantages for these aphids including a lower predation pressure through ant presence and enhanced chances of establishing mutuaslistic interactions with neighbour ant colonies. In the field, aphid colonies are often observed in higher densities around ant nests, which is probably linked to a better survival ensured by ants’ services. Nevertheless, this could also result from a preferential establishment of winged aphids in ant-frequented areas. We tested this last hypothesis through different ethological assays and show that the facultative myrmecophilous black bean aphid, Aphis fabae L., does not orientate its search for a host plant preferentially towards ant-frequented plants. However our results suggest that ants reduce the number of winged aphids leaving the newly colonized plant. Thus, ants involved in facultative myrmecophilous interactions with aphids appear to contribute to structure aphid populations in the field by ensuring a better establishment and survival of newly established colonies rather than by inducing a deliberate plant selection by aphid partners based on the proximity of ant colonies. [less ▲]

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See detailJatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae): Insectes ravageurs et propriétés biocides
Abdoul Habou, Zakari; Toudou, Adam; Haubruge, Eric ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (in press)

Jatropha curcas, ou Pourghère, est un arbuste de la famille des Euphorbiacées, largement répandu dans les pays tropicaux. Ses graines sont riches d'une huile pouvant servir de biocarburant dans les ... [more ▼]

Jatropha curcas, ou Pourghère, est un arbuste de la famille des Euphorbiacées, largement répandu dans les pays tropicaux. Ses graines sont riches d'une huile pouvant servir de biocarburant dans les moteurs diesels modifiés. La plante est attaquée par divers insectes ravageurs appartenant principalement aux ordres des Hétéroptères, Coléoptères et Orthoptères. Ils provoquent des dégâts sur les fruits, les inflorescences et les feuilles. Les ravageurs les plus fréquemment observés sur J. curcas sont des punaises du genre Pachycoris (Hétéroptère : Scutelleridae), qui sont largement répandues au Mexique, en Australie, aux États-Unis, au Brésil et au Nicaragua. Ces punaises causent des dégâts importants sur les fruits et provoquent la malformation des graines, et avec elle une réduction de la teneur en huile. Même si les arbustes de Jatropha sont victime d'infestations d'insectes, plusieurs études démontrent l'effet insecticide de son huile contre des ravageurs importants tels que Busseola fusca (Fuller) (Lépidoptère : Noctuidae), Sesamia calamistis Hampson (Lépidoptère : Noctuidae), Aphis gossypii Glover (Homoptère: Aphididae) et Callosobruchus chinensis L. (Coléoptère : Bruchidae). Dans ce document, nous présentons dans une première partie les principaux insectes ravageurs de J. curcas et dans une seconde section les effets insecticides démontrés de son huile. [less ▲]

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See detailEffet du mode de conservation d’huile de Jatropha curcas L. sur son efficacité dans la lutte contre les principaux insectes ravageurs du niébé (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. au Niger
Abdoul Habou, zakari; Toudou, Adam; Haubruge, Eric ULg et al

in Tropicultura (in press)

Jatropha curcas oil has an insecticidal activity harnessed by the farmers in Niger. In this study, we compared the insecticidal activity of two batches of oil conserved during 70 days, one exposed to ... [more ▼]

Jatropha curcas oil has an insecticidal activity harnessed by the farmers in Niger. In this study, we compared the insecticidal activity of two batches of oil conserved during 70 days, one exposed to light and the other kept in the dark. The insecticidal efficacy was evaluated in a field with three concentrations (5, 10 and 15%) trial on the main pests of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) and in a laboratory test on Megalurothrips sjostedti Trybon (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) with different concentrations of crude oil (50; 100; 150 and 200 µl). No difference in insecticidal effect was found between the two modes of oil conservation, both in the laboratory and in the field. In the field, regardless of the mode of conservation, the concentrations of 10% of J. curcas oil enables a reduction of over than 80% of thrips, aphids, and bugs compared to the control. Its increased seeds yield more than 50%. The concentration of 15% gives an insecticidal effect comparable to that of the reference treatment (deltaméthrine) but induces phytotoxicity symptoms on the leaves of Cowpea. [less ▲]

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See detailIs Contact Between Conspecifics Involved in the Cohesion of Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Aggregations?
Durieux, Delphine ULg; Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg et al

in Journal of Insect Behavior (2014), 27(1), 1-13

The multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), exhibits a gregarious behavior during unfavorable winter conditions. Although this behavior is currently described as a phenomenon occurring ... [more ▼]

The multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), exhibits a gregarious behavior during unfavorable winter conditions. Although this behavior is currently described as a phenomenon occurring only during winter, aggregations can also be observed outside overwintering conditions. However, the substrate markings previously highlighted as being involved in the wintry aggregation of this exotic species do not seem to be used by non-overwintering individuals to aggregate. This fact suggests then that other cues are responsible for the induction of this behavior. In this work, we have tested the hypothesis that direct contact between non-overwintering individuals stimulates the establishment of clusters. Binary choice experiments highlighted the involvement of elytral cuticular compounds in this phenomenon. Chromatographic analyses showed that the active extracts contained mainly hydrocarbons, including saturated, mono-unsaturated, and di-unsaturated homologues. Physical contact also seems to be involved in the non-overwintering aggregative behavior of H. axyridis, but to a lesser extent than these natural compounds. These findings could eventually be used to develop new control methods of these pest populations and so, reduce the adverse impacts it causes on biodiversity. [less ▲]

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See detailBelowground Chemical Ecology: The Case of Wireworms
Barsics, Fanny ULg; Delory, Benjamin ULg; Delaplace, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2014, June)

Wireworms, clock-beetles' larvae (Coleoptera, Elateridae), are below ground pests of many crops. They cause dramatic yield losses worldwide. Research on their ecology is crucial to undertake innovative ... [more ▼]

Wireworms, clock-beetles' larvae (Coleoptera, Elateridae), are below ground pests of many crops. They cause dramatic yield losses worldwide. Research on their ecology is crucial to undertake innovative management strategies. In the field of chemical ecology, multitrophic interactions occurring in the rhizosphere are gaining increasing attention from entomologists and agronomists. Our research aims at unveiling the role of volatile organic compounds (VOC) involved in wireworms' foraging behavior, putatively leading to host localization and/or host recognition. [less ▲]

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See detailIs conspecific substrate marking a long-term external memory of previously colonized overwintering sites in Harmonia axyridis?
Durieux, Delphine ULg; Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Vanderplanck, Maryse et al

in Journal of Applied Entomology (2014), 138(5), 338-345

The multicoloured Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), aggregates inside dwellings during winters to survive the cold. This beetle uses chemical cues coming from congeners to select an ... [more ▼]

The multicoloured Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), aggregates inside dwellings during winters to survive the cold. This beetle uses chemical cues coming from congeners to select an overwintering site. Recent research has shown that they preferentially gather at places where conspecifics previously laid a substrate marking made up of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Some authors have reported that H. axyridis colonizes the same overwintering sites from 1 year to another. Herein, the hypothesis that this substrate marking is used by H. axyridis to settle in the same aggregation sites from one winter to another was tested. To this aim, the temporal modification in the chemical profile of the hydrocarbon marking was studied by performing chromatographic analyses. After 1 year, the overall profile was modified qualitatively and quantitatively: the unsaturated hydrocarbons were no longer detected while some saturated hydrocarbons were still present in large quantities. In a behavioural assay conducted in the laboratory, the 12-month-old marking did not induce the aggregation of H. axyridis. This result indicates that the chemical markings left by conspecifics during a previous aggregation period in an overwintering site are not sufficient to induce the gathering of the newly arriving individuals. [less ▲]

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See detailFive Years of aphidophagous species sampling in belgian corn
Vandereycken, Axel ULg; Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Durieux, Delphine ULg et al

Poster (2014, May 20)

The community of aphidophagous species present in agroecosystems is disturbed since the introduction of an exotic species the Multicoloured Asian Ladybird, Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera ... [more ▼]

The community of aphidophagous species present in agroecosystems is disturbed since the introduction of an exotic species the Multicoloured Asian Ladybird, Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). In this intensive agricultural area, five aphids predator species are commonly observed: three coccinellids H. axyridis, Coccinella septempunctata, Propylea quatuordecimpunctata, one hoverfly Episyrphus balteatus, and one lacewing Chrysoperla carnea. This study focuses on the occurrence of the five most abundant aphid predators and their seasonal abundance in corn. The abundance of adults and larvae of these species was evaluated over a five-year period, from 2009 to 2013. The sampling method consisted in the counting of aphids and all developmental stages of aphidophages present in quadrats of 1m² from April to November. Densities of aphid predators changed during five years studies. Since 2011, H. axyridis was the most abundant aphids predators in corn. H. axyridis numbers were found to increase over the first four inventoried year, reaching in 2012 86% for adult stage (119,7±7,8 adults/100m2) and 76% for larvae stages (242,8±14,2 larvae/100m2) of the aphid predators, while in 2009 these ratios were 14% and 23% respectively. For C. septempunctata and P. quatuordecimpunctata the population densities decrease at the end of the five years period. Population densities of C. carnea and E. balteatus were variable during the sampling period but increased in 2013. Phenology of the five studied species presents similar curves following the aphid abundance. The most abundant observed aphids were metopolophium dirhodum, rhopalosiphum padi, rhopalosiphum maidis, sitobion avenae and sitobion fragariae. H. axyridis starts reproducing after the peak in aphid population, suggesting that H. axyridis is able to complete its development by feeding on alternative prey such as larvae and pupae of conspecific and heterospecific. H. axyridis is a bivoltine species but the second generation was stop by the corn harvesting. [less ▲]

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See detailLa mineuse de la tomate et ses risques agriculturaux
De Backer, Lara ULg; Verheggen, François ULg

Conference (2014, May)

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See detailConservatoire entomologique de Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech: les coccinelles de Wallonie et de Bruxelles de 2001 à 2009
Vandereycken, Axel ULg; Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Durieux, Delphine ULg et al

Poster (2014, April 02)

Un inventaire des Coccinellidae présents au sein de la collection de l’unité d’Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive (ULg - Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech) a été réalisé sur la période s’étendant de 2001 à 2009 ... [more ▼]

Un inventaire des Coccinellidae présents au sein de la collection de l’unité d’Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive (ULg - Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech) a été réalisé sur la période s’étendant de 2001 à 2009. Cette collection est essentiellement constituée par les récoltes des étudiants de première Bachelier de Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech. A travers ce recensement, nous avons étudié l’évolution des espèces récoltées au sein de cette famille en termes d’effectif relatif et de richesse spécifique. Notre étude s’est focalisée sur les données issues de Wallonie et de la Région de Bruxelles-Capitale, trop peu de collectes ayant été réalisées en Flandre. Parmi les individus identifiés, 27 espèces ont été observées, dont 21 appartiennent à la sous-famille des Coccinellinae, 2 à celle des Epilachninae et 4 à celle des Chilocorinae. La plupart des espèces sont communes à la Belgique. Cependant, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas 1773), espèce originaire du sud-est de l’Asie, a été introduite sur le territoire belge en 1997. Cette coccinelle exotique fait son apparition dans les récoltes de 2002 et son effectif ne cesse d’augmenter au fil des années prospectées. En parallèle à cette augmentation, une diminution de la richesse spécifique, ainsi que de l’effectif relatif d’Adalia bipunctata (L. 1758), de Propylea quatuordecimpunctata (L. 1758) et de Psyllobora vigintiduopunctata (L. 1758), est observée. [less ▲]

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See detailStudy of sex ratio and morphotypes of the Multicoloured Asian Ladybird, Harmonia axyridis Pallas in Belgian corn
Vandereycken, Axel ULg; Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Barsics, Fanny ULg et al

Poster (2014, April 02)

Several insect species are known to have different morphotypes, an adaptation to heterogeneities in changing environments. This phenotypic plasticity could be a factor used by the Multicoloured Asian ... [more ▼]

Several insect species are known to have different morphotypes, an adaptation to heterogeneities in changing environments. This phenotypic plasticity could be a factor used by the Multicoloured Asian Ladybird, which is considered as an invasive species in Europe since its introduction in the 80’s. Harmonia axyridis has four major morphotypes: 2 melanic forms, conspicua and spectabilis; and 2 non-melanic, succinea and axyridis. In Belgium, only the three first are observed. Literature reports variations in morphotype frequencies, across native and introduced strains. These variations seem to be linked to climate (geographical and seasonal variation), with non-melanic forms being the most abundant in hot and arid climate. This study focused on the variation of morphotype abundance in H. axyridis according to season, field and gender. Adult ladybirds were caught from mid-July to mid-October 2012 into 5 corn fields. The proportions of observed morphotypes were compared according to the sampling season. The abundance of morphotypes was not significantly different through the fields; the observed ratios were 81.6%, 15% and 3.4% for succinea, spectabilis and conspicua respectively. Succinea was the most observed morphotype (χ2=755.8; P<0.001). The total number of collected males and females was the same with ratios of 48.2% and 51.8%: (χ2=0.93; P=0.33). The sex ratio was also not significantly different for each morphotype. There was no evolution of melanic and non-melanic form ratio according to the season, with 25.6% of melanic form in summer and 20.6% in autumn (χ2=1.22; P=0.27). Our results seem to show that morphotype adaptation according to the climate is not observed for Belgian ladybirds. We discuss these results according to all environmental data available. [less ▲]

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See detailWill top-down interactions be affacted by climate change?
Boullis, Antoine ULg; Verheggen, François ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg

Poster (2014, April 02)

Greenhouse gas emissions are rising since the beginning of the industrial era: atmospheric carbon dioxide now exceeds 400 ppm (30% increase since the mid-1800s) and tropospheric ozone has reached 40 ppb ... [more ▼]

Greenhouse gas emissions are rising since the beginning of the industrial era: atmospheric carbon dioxide now exceeds 400 ppm (30% increase since the mid-1800s) and tropospheric ozone has reached 40 ppb in industrialized areas. According to forecasting models, these concentrations are expected to double by the end of the 21st century. To date, impacts of elevated greenhouse gases have been extensively studied in plant-insect interactions, whereas interactions between herbivores and their natural enemies have been neglected. Because most interactions between herbivorous insects and their natural enemies are orchestrated by natural molecules produced as semiochemicals, we hypothesize that modification in atmospheric gas composition will alter chemical communication in insects, and affect the performance of natural enemies to locate their prey. In this project, we shall attempt to analyze the effect of increase in greenhouse gas concentrations on insect communication, particularly in top-down interactions. The study model will consist in the interactions between the pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris)) and their natural enemies Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) and Episyrphus balteatus (DeGeer). Under elevated CO2 and/or O3 concentrations, we will quantify the production of several aphid semiochemicals that are currently used as kairomones by natural enemies, including the aphid alarm pheromone E-β-farnesene and honeydew volatile compounds. Olfactometry assays will then be set up to examine the ability of natural enemies to locate their prey in the predicted atmospheric conditions of the end of the 21st century. Finally, using an Ecotron structure to be built in Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, we will simulate a future ecosystem with the possibility to control additional biotic and abiotic parameters. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst evidence of a volatile sex pheromone in the invasive Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)
Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg; Durieux, Delphine ULg et al

Conference (2014, April 02)

Data about sex pheromones, or any semiochemicals that play a role in Coccinellid mating, remain limited. Since years, various studies and behavioral observations have hypothesized that such molecules are ... [more ▼]

Data about sex pheromones, or any semiochemicals that play a role in Coccinellid mating, remain limited. Since years, various studies and behavioral observations have hypothesized that such molecules are involved in sexual communication of ladybeetles. In this study, we collected volatile organic compounds released by virgin females of the multicolored Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), which were either allowed or not allowed to feed on aphids. In the presence of aphids, virgin females exhibited “calling behavior”, which has been associated with the emission of a sex pheromone in several Coleoptera species. Bioassays showed that these females released a blend of volatile compounds that is involved in the attraction of males. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analyses highlighted specific volatile cues emanating from females, whereas males did not produce these compounds. Five components were identified: (–)-β-caryophyllene, β elemene, methyl-eugenol, α humulene, and α bulnesene. All compounds were produced after virgin females were fed aphids, and their quantity increased across the experimental period. The results confirm that female H. axyridis produce a volatile sex pheromone. Therefore, this study provides important biological information that could promote the development of efficient pest control management methods to manipulate the movements of this invasive ladybeetle, and to reduce its negative impacts on biodiversity. [less ▲]

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See detailA pheromone-based formulation against phytophagous pests
Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Vandereycken, Axel ULg; Heuskin, Stéphanie ULg et al

Poster (2014, April 02)

Innovative integrated pest management methods are needed to overcome market withdrawal of synthetic pesticides. Therefore, the identification of environment-friendly bio-products carrying direct or ... [more ▼]

Innovative integrated pest management methods are needed to overcome market withdrawal of synthetic pesticides. Therefore, the identification of environment-friendly bio-products carrying direct or indirect biocide activity is one promising alternative option. Our researches focus on the identification of appropriate formulations releasing volatile organic compounds that are attractive for natural enemies of insect pests. However, the elaboration of slow-release devices that ensure stable and controlled release of active volatile compounds is quite challenging. Here, we developed a formulation based on E-β-farnesene and (–)-β-caryophyllene, these two semiochemicals having strong attractive potential on aphid natural enemies including ladybeetles and hoverflies. Both compounds were encapsulated together in alginate gel beads. The blend efficiency is currently being evaluated through laboratory and field assays. [less ▲]

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See detailAphid honeydew: An arrestant and a contact kairomone for Episyrphus balteatus (Diptera: Syrphidae) larvae and adults
Leroy, Pascal; Almohamad, Raki; Attia, Sabrine et al

in European Journal of Entomology (2014), 111(2), 237-242

Predator searching efficiency increases in response to a variety of environmental cues associated with its prey. The sugary excretion of aphids (honeydew) has been found to act as a prey-associated cue ... [more ▼]

Predator searching efficiency increases in response to a variety of environmental cues associated with its prey. The sugary excretion of aphids (honeydew) has been found to act as a prey-associated cue for many aphid natural enemies. In the present study, the honeydew excreted by Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) was identified as an arrestant and a contact kairomone for young larvae and adults of a common predatory hoverfly, Episyrphus balteatus (De Geer) (Diptera: Syrphidae). First and second instar larvae increased their foraging behaviour in the honeydew-treated area. When plants were sprayed with crude honeydew, the speed of movement of female E. balteatus was significantly higher than in controls, resulting in a longer period of time spent on treated plants and laying eggs. We conclude that the honeydew excreted by A. pisum induces searching behaviour and acts as and arrestant not only for adults but also for young E. balteatus larvae. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of larval host plant experience and solanaceous plant volatile emissions in Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) host finding behavior
Caparros Megido, Rudy ULg; De Backer, Lara; Ettaïb, Refki et al

in Arthropod-Plant Interactions (2014)

The tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepi- doptera: Gelechiidae), is considered to be a major pest that damages tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L; Solanaceae) crops in South American, European, and ... [more ▼]

The tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepi- doptera: Gelechiidae), is considered to be a major pest that damages tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L; Solanaceae) crops in South American, European, and Mediterranean countries. This insect species is polyphagous (i.e., feeds on many types of food); hence, it could also develop on other cultivated host plants, principally solanaceous plants, such as potato (S. tuberosum L.; Solanaceae) and eggplant (S. melongena L.; Solanaceae). Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that host plant choice by adult T. absoluta is influenced by plant volatile organic compounds and larval host plant experience. One tomato cultivar (cv.) ‘Money- maker’ and three potato cv. ‘Charlotte’ ‘Bintje,’ and ‘Nicola’ were tested. Using a flying tunnel, we observed that females reared on tomato preferred flying toward tomato and, to a lesser extent, potato cv. ‘Charlotte.’ These preferences might be explained by the high release of terpenes by these two plants. When conducting oviposition choice assays, we found no preference between tomato and potato in the number of eggs laid by females that had been previously reared on either host plant. This study indicates that the host finding behavior of T. absoluta is mediated by solanaceous volatiles, while oviposition behavior appears to depend on additional stimuli. These results provide baseline information for use in the development of new control strategies against T. absoluta using semiochemicals and plant breeding. [less ▲]

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See detailÉvaluation du potentiel de dix accessions de Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) au Niger
Abdoul Habou, Zakari; Katkore, Boubacar; Abasse, Tougiani et al

in Journal of Applied Biosciences (2014), 77

Objective: A trial of the ten accessions for J curcas was carried out at regional Agricultural Research Center of Maradi in Niger, with aim to evaluate the performance of Jatropha curcas accessions ... [more ▼]

Objective: A trial of the ten accessions for J curcas was carried out at regional Agricultural Research Center of Maradi in Niger, with aim to evaluate the performance of Jatropha curcas accessions. Methodology and results: Each accession was represented by two rows and each row has 15 plant trees of J. curcas. Data on the rate of survival and growth parameters of each tree were collected. Results revealed that there is no significant difference between accessions tested for height and diameter. Accessions Katil 13 and GB 14 respectively originated from Mali and Bisseau Guinea were best adapted for the Niger conditions. The yield value of 511 and 445 kg per hectare respectively obtained from Katil 13 and GB 14 in 2012.Conclusion and application of results: The Government of Niger has drawn attention to this crop and has launched a J. curcas plantation for seed production of 150 ha at Guessalbodi. National Research Institution. NGOs are also involved in J. curcas plantation for biofuel use. [less ▲]

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