References of "Vercheval, Lionel"
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See detailStructures of class D β-lactamases
Kerff, Frédéric ULg; Sauvage, Eric ULg; Vercheval, Lionel ULg et al

in Frère, Jean-Marie (Ed.) Beta-lactamases (2011)

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See detailThree factors that modulate the activity of class D β-lactamases and interfere with the post-translational carboxylation of Lys 70
Vercheval, Lionel ULg; Di Paolo, Alexandre ULg; Borel, Franck et al

in Biochemical Journal (2010), 432(3), 495-504

Lys-70 carboxylation in the active site of class D β lactamases is essential for their activity. Structural, kinetic and affinity studies show that this post-translational modification can be affected by ... [more ▼]

Lys-70 carboxylation in the active site of class D β lactamases is essential for their activity. Structural, kinetic and affinity studies show that this post-translational modification can be affected by the presence of a poor substrate such as moxalactam but also by the V117T substitution. Val-117 is a strictly conserved hydrophobic residue located in the active site. In addition, inhibition of class D β lactamases by chloride ions is due to a competition between the side chain carboxylate of the modified Lys 70 and chloride ions. Determination of the individual kinetic constants shows that the deacylation of the acyl-enzyme is the rate limiting step for the wild type OXA 10 β lactamase. [less ▲]

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See detailCurrent challenges in antimicrobial chemotherapy: focus on beta-lactamase inhibition.
Bebrone, Carine ULg; Lassaux, Patricia ULg; Vercheval, Lionel ULg et al

in Drugs (2010), 70(6)

The use of the three classical beta-lactamase inhibitors (clavulanic acid, tazobactam, sulbactam) in combination with beta-lactam antibiotics is currently the most successful strategy to combat the beta ... [more ▼]

The use of the three classical beta-lactamase inhibitors (clavulanic acid, tazobactam, sulbactam) in combination with beta-lactam antibiotics is currently the most successful strategy to combat the beta-lactamase mediated resistance. However, these inhibitors are efficient in inactivating class A beta-lactamases only and the efficiency of the inhibitor/antibiotic combination can be compromised by several mechanisms among which the production of naturally resistant class B or class D enzymes, the hyperproduction of AmpC or even the production of evolved inhibitor-resistant class A enzymes. There is thus an urgent need in the development of novel inhibitors. For serine active enzymes (classes A, C and D), derivatives of the beta-lactam ring such as 6-beta-halogenopenicillanates, beta-lactam sulfones, penems and oxapenems, monobactams or trinems seem to be potential starting points to design efficient molecules (among which AM-112 and LK-157). Moreover, a promising non-beta-lactam molecule, NXL-104 is now under clinical trial. In contrast, an ideal inhibitor of metallo-beta-lactamases (class B) remains to be found, despite the huge number of potential molecules already described (biphenyl tetrazoles, cysteinyl peptides, mercaptocarboxylates, succinic acid derivatives, etc). The search for such an inhibitor is complicated by the absence of a covalent intermediate in their catalytic mechanisms and the fact that beta-lactam derivatives often behave as substrates rather than as inhibitors. Currently, the most promising broad spectrum inhibitors of class B enzymes are molecules presenting chelating groups (thiols, carboxylates, etc) combined with an aromatic group. This review describes all the types of molecules already tested as potential beta-lactamase inhibitors and thus constitutes an update of the current status in beta-lactamase inhibitor discovery. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscovery of novel lipophilic inhibitors of OXA-10 enzyme (class D beta-lactamase) by screening amino analogs and homologs of citrate and isocitrate.
Beck, Joséphine; Vercheval, Lionel ULg; Bebrone, Carine ULg et al

in Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters (2009), 19

Aminocitrate (and homolog) derivatives have been prepared by bis-alkylation of glycinate Schiff bases with bromoacetates (and ethyl acrylate), followed by N-acylation and esters (partial or complete ... [more ▼]

Aminocitrate (and homolog) derivatives have been prepared by bis-alkylation of glycinate Schiff bases with bromoacetates (and ethyl acrylate), followed by N-acylation and esters (partial or complete) deprotection. Aminoisocitrate was similarly obtained by mono-alkylation with diethyl fumarate. Evaluation against representative beta-lactamases revealed that the free acid derivatives are modest inhibitors of class A enzymes, whilst their benzyl esters showed a good inhibition of OXA-10 (class D enzyme). A docking experiment featured hydrophobic interactions in the active site. [less ▲]

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See detailAminophosphonic Acids and Aminobis(phosphonic acids) as Potential Inhibitors of Penicillin-Binding Proteins
Beck, Josephine; Gharbi, Sonia; Herteg-Fernea, Adriana et al

in European Journal of Organic Chemistry (2009), (1), 85-97

Abstract Aminophosphonic acids and aminobis(phosphonic acids) have been prepared by the alkylation of Schiff bases with methyl bromoacetate or ethyl acrylate. Other pathways, like the modified Pudovik ... [more ▼]

Abstract Aminophosphonic acids and aminobis(phosphonic acids) have been prepared by the alkylation of Schiff bases with methyl bromoacetate or ethyl acrylate. Other pathways, like the modified Pudovik reaction and Kabachnik-Fields reaction, have been considered for the synthesis of the -phosphonic bioisoster of aminocitrate. Partial or complete deprotection of the phosphonate ester have been realised by either acidic hydrolysis or by treatment with trimethylsilyl bromide. Evaluation against penicillin-binding proteins has shown that our compounds are modest inhibitors of class A -lactamases, but have an interesting activity against R39 (D,D-peptidase/carboxypeptidase). [less ▲]

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See detailCritical role of tryptophan 154 for the activity and stability of class D beta-lactamases.
Baurin, Stephane; Vercheval, Lionel ULg; Bouillenne, Fabrice ULg et al

in Biochemistry (2009), 48(47), 11252-63

The catalytic efficiency of the class D beta-lactamase OXA-10 depends critically on an unusual carboxylated lysine as the general base residue for both the enzyme acylation and deacylation steps of ... [more ▼]

The catalytic efficiency of the class D beta-lactamase OXA-10 depends critically on an unusual carboxylated lysine as the general base residue for both the enzyme acylation and deacylation steps of catalysis. Evidence is presented that the interaction between the indole group of Trp154 and the carboxylated lysine is essential for the stability of the posttranslationally modified Lys70. Substitution of Trp154 by Gly, Ala, or Phe yielded noncarboxylated enzymes which displayed poor catalytic efficiencies and reduced stability when compared to the wild-type OXA-10. The W154H mutant was partially carboxylated. In addition, the maximum values of k(cat) and k(cat)/K(M) were shifted toward pH 7, indicating that the carboxylation state of Lys70 is dependent on the protonation level of the histidine. A comparison of the three-dimensional structures of the different proteins also indicated that the Trp154 mutations did not modify the overall structures of OXA-10 but induced an increased flexibility of the Omega-loop in the active site. Finally, the deacylation-impaired W154A mutant was used to determine the structure of the acyl-enzyme complex with benzylpenicillin. These results indicate a role of the Lys70 carboxylation during the deacylation step and emphasize the importance of Trp154 for the ideal positioning of active site residues leading to an optimum activity. [less ▲]

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