References of "Vanderthommen, Marc"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe contrôle moteur lombopelvien du joueur de footbal élite
GROSDENT, Stéphanie ULg; Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Namurois, Guy et al

in Abstarct Book de la 1ère Journée Guy Namurois (2014, February 22)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLombostat au long cours versus école du dos périodique
Tomasella, Marco ULg; Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Vanderthommen, Marc ULg et al

in Revue Belge du dommage corporel et de médecine légale (2014), 41ème année(2014/1), 3-12

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailProtection against muscle damage induced by electrical stimulation: efficiency of a preconditioning programme
Vanderthommen, Marc ULg; Chamayou, Remy; Demoulin, Christophe ULg et al

in Clinical Physiology & Functional Imaging (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRééducation du rachis cervical (principes, méthodes, indication)
Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Cagnie, Barbara; GROSDENT, Stéphanie ULg et al

in Réflexions Rhumatologiques (2013), 162(17), 14-16

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (10 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes the surgical treatment for lumbar radiculopathy fulfil patients preoperative expectations?
Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Lakaye, M.; Martin, Didier ULg et al

in Abstract book of the 8th Interdisciplinary World Congress on Low Back and Pelvic Pain (2013, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailIs the Sorensen test really a fatigue task for trunk extensor muscles?
Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Boyer, M.; GROSDENT, Stéphanie ULg et al

in Abstract book of the 8th Interdisciplinary World Congress on Low Back and Pelvic Pain (2013, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailAre the back educational interventions effective for preventing low back pain
Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Marty, M.; Genevay, S. et al

in Abstract book of the 8th Interdisciplinary World Congress on Low Back and Pelvic Pain (2013, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntérêt des ondes de choc dans le traitement des fasciites plantaires
Fromm, Aurélien; Vanderthommen, Marc ULg; LAURENT, Jean-Marie ULg et al

in European Journal of Sports Medicine (2013, September), 1(Supplement 1), 276-277

Introduction : Over the past ten years, radial shock wave therapy usage has grown tremendously. Prescribed for chronic tendinopathy, its real benefit has yet to be demonstrated. Objective : Demonstrate ... [more ▼]

Introduction : Over the past ten years, radial shock wave therapy usage has grown tremendously. Prescribed for chronic tendinopathy, its real benefit has yet to be demonstrated. Objective : Demonstrate radial shock wave therapy benefits in plantar fasciitis treatment. Materials and methods : Our experimentation is a study over twelve weeks divided in 2 periods: the control phase (week 0 to week 6) and treatment phase (week 6 to week 11). It includes 3 evaluations (T1, T2 and T3) respectively at 0, 6 and 11 weeks. A standard evaluation consists of one VAS pain, an algo-functional backwash survey about the ankle (modified FFI), algometer test and dynamic analysis of the foot on strength platform. The radial shock wave therapy has been performed thanks to Swiss DolorClast machine (Electro Medical Systems) Results : Statistical analysis show radial shock wave therapy induces a highly significant improvement (p<0,0001) on EVA results (50%), ankle algo-functional backwash (62.6%) and pain sensitivity threshold (49.6%). Therefore, a significant correlation can be observed during T2- T3 period between pain sensitivity threshold improvement and patients age (p=0,012). The statistical results show a time increase trend for foot-ground contact over time. It is not significant though. Conclusion : The use of radial shock wave therapy in plantar fasciitis treatment helps decrease pain and improve step. However, additional studies performed on bigger samples have to be completed to confirm these results. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 209 (14 ULg)
Full Text
See detailAnalyse de l'efficacité des programmes d'éducation rachidienne pour la prévention des lombalgies
Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Marty, M.; Genevay, S. et al

in Neurone (2013), 18

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGaseous and traditional forms of cryotherapy provide similar outcomes following TKA
Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Brouwers, M.; Darot, S. et al

in Orthoevidence: ACE-Evidence report (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence de la position assise d’enfants sur leurs capacités cognitives
Fettweis, Tatiana ULg; Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Vanderthommen, Marc ULg

in Kinesitherapie Revue (2013), 13(136), 20-25

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailValidity of a new self-administered questionnaire assessing back posture habits
Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Martin, E.; GROSDENT, Stéphanie ULg et al

in Abstract Book of 6th Biennial Congress Belgian Back Society (2012, November 17)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntérêt du Start Back Screening Tool pour les médecins généralistes
Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Mahieu, Geneviève; Hill, JC et al

in Abstract Book of 6th Biennial Congress Belgian Back Society (2012, November 17)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEVALUATION AND IMPROVEMENT OF CHILD’S SITTING POSITION IN CLASSROOM
Fettweis, Tatiana ULg; Henrist, Laura; Vanderthommen, Marc ULg

Poster (2012, November 17)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSymptoms associated with lumbar instability in athletes with low back pain
GROSDENT, Stéphanie ULg; Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Tomasella, Marco ULg et al

Poster (2012, November 17)

Introduction. Low back pain (LBP) is common among athletes and can be challenging for athletic trainers and therapists. Unfortunately, little is known about symptoms associated with functional lumbar ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Low back pain (LBP) is common among athletes and can be challenging for athletic trainers and therapists. Unfortunately, little is known about symptoms associated with functional lumbar segmental instability (FLSI) in athletes with LBP. Purpose. To determine subjective and objective symptoms associated with FLSI in athletes with LBP. Materials and Methods. We included 24 male athletes (12 soccer players and 12 tennis players) with non specific LBP mean (± standard deviation) pain intensity (0-100 Visual Analogue Scale) and disability (0-24 Roland-Disability questionnaire) scores reaching respectively 35 (±20) and 4 (±3). Athletes were submitted to a standardized anamnesis (including subjective identifiers of FLSI) and a clinical assessment conducted by a manual therapist who explored objective identifiers of FLSI. Results. According to the manual therapist, 12 athletes (6 tennis and 6 soccer players) presented a FLSI. The two groups did not differ regarding pain intensity and disability (P>0.05). However, athletes with FLSI appeared significantly younger than non FLSI athletes (P<0.01). Only three subjective identifiers appeared significantly related to FLSI in soccer and tennis players with LBP: “reports frequent episodes of muscle spasms”, “reports feelings of giving way or back giving out” and “Pain increased with sudden, trivial, or mild movements”. Regarding objective identifiers of FLSI, “positive prone instability test”, “aberrant movement during active and passive trunk flexion-extension“ and “poor lumbopelvic control” were significantly related to FLSI in these athletes. Conclusions. In this preliminary study, 50% of the athletes with LBP presented a FLSI. Some subjective and objective symptoms are significantly related to FLSI in soccer and tennis players. Implications. Athletes with LSI should be targeted for retraining to restore normal movement control. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailINTERRATER AGREEMENT OF CLINICAL TESTS/SIGNS USED TO IDENTIFY PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR FUNCTIONAL INSTABILITY
Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Emmanuel, P.; DISTREE, Vincent ULg et al

in Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (2012, October), 42(10), 57

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAssessment of lumbopelvic movement control in tennis players with and without low back pain
GROSDENT, Stéphanie ULg; Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Lemaire, Vincent et al

Poster (2012, October)

Relevance: LBP is common among tennis players. More than one third of professional tennis players reported LBP as reason for missing at least one tournament. As impaired lumbar motor functions have been ... [more ▼]

Relevance: LBP is common among tennis players. More than one third of professional tennis players reported LBP as reason for missing at least one tournament. As impaired lumbar motor functions have been associated with LBP, it appears particularly relevant to assess lumbopelvic movement control in tennis players. Methods: Twenty amateur tennis players (male, 22.9 ± 3.0 years) were included. Subjects were pooled into two groups: 10 players with chronic LBP (mean pain duration: 3.1 ± 2.6 years, pain severity score: 3.5/10 on a pain visual analogue scale) and 10 players without LBP. The Bent Knee Fall Out (BKFO) test was used to assess the players’ ability to control movement of lumbopelvic region. BKFO was performed in supine position and monitored by means of two pressure biofeedback units inflated to 40 mmHg and positioned under the lumbar spine of the participant. The reliability of this test has been previously assessed. Players were instructed to make an active abduction-external rotation movement of the hip (45°) without concomitant lumbopelvic movement of the pelvis and low back. Pressure modification (mmHg) was recorded, each side was assessed. Results: Tennis players with LBP had a worse lumbopelvic movement control than players without LBP both for dominant (9.0 mm Hg vs 3.4 mmHg, P<0.05) as well for the non-dominant side (9.1 mmHg vs 4.6 mmHg, P<0.05). Conclusions: Tennis players with LBP experience similar alterations of motor control as those observed in sedentary people with LBP. However, it remains unclear if these alterations are the cause of the consequence of chronic LBP. Implications: Further prospective studies should assess the cause or effect relationship and should determine whether motor control exercises are effective in tennis players with chronic LBP. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (5 ULg)