References of "Vanderick, Sylvie"
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See detailCapitalizing in fine milk composition for breeding and management of dairy cows
Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg; Dehareng, Fréderic et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2016), 99

The challenge of managing and breeding dairy cows is permanently adapting to changing production circumstances under socio-economic constraints. If managing and breeding address different timeframes of ... [more ▼]

The challenge of managing and breeding dairy cows is permanently adapting to changing production circumstances under socio-economic constraints. If managing and breeding address different timeframes of action, both need relevant phenotypes that allow for precise monitoring of the status of the cows, and their health, behavior, and well-being as well as their environmental impact and the quality of their products (i.e., milk and subsequently dairy products). Milk composition has been identified as an important source of information because it could reflect, at least partially, all these elements. Major conventional milk components such as fat, protein, urea, and lactose contents are routinely predicted by mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry and have been widely used for these purposes. But, milk composition is much more complex and other nonconventional milk components, potentially predicted by MIR, might be informative. Such new milk-based phenotypes should be considered given that they are cheap, rapidly obtained, usable on a large scale, robust, and reliable. In a first approach, new phenotypes can be predicted from MIR spectra using techniques based on classical prediction equations. This method was used successfully for many novel traits (e.g., fatty acids, lactoferrin, minerals, milk technological properties, citrate) that can be then useful for management and breeding purposes. An innovation was to consider the longitudinal nature of the relationship between the trait of interest and the MIR spectra (e.g., to predict methane from MIR). By avoiding intermediate steps, prediction errors can be minimized when traits of interest (e.g., methane, energy balance, ketosis) are predicted directly from MIR spectra. In a second approach, research is ongoing to detect and exploit patterns in an innovative manner, by comparing observed with expected MIR spectra directly (e.g., pregnancy). All of these traits can then be used to define best practices, adjust feeding and health management, improve animal welfare, improve milk quality, and mitigate environmental impact. Under the condition that MIR data are available on a large scale, phenotypes for these traits will allow genetic and genomic evaluations. Introduction of novel traits into the breeding objectives will need additional research to clarify socio-economic weights and genetic correlations with other traits of interest. [less ▲]

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See detailSystème d'évaluations génomiques des bovins laitiers en Wallonie (Belgique)
Colinet, Frédéric ULg; Vandenplas, Jérémie; Vanderick, Sylvie ULg et al

Computer development (2015)

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See detailDerivation of a new lamb survival trait for the New Zealand sheep industry
Vanderick, Sylvie ULg; Auvray, Benoit; Newman, Sheryl-Anne et al

in Journal of Animal Science (2015), 93

Previous research identified that a review of the current industry New Zealand lamb survival trait was necessary as its recording accuracy was reliant on farmers notifying their Sheep Improvement Limited ... [more ▼]

Previous research identified that a review of the current industry New Zealand lamb survival trait was necessary as its recording accuracy was reliant on farmers notifying their Sheep Improvement Limited bureau of lamb deaths. This paper reports the decision rules and genetic parameters for a new lamb survival trait for the New Zealand sheep industry. These rules define the new lamb survival trait (NEWSUR) using lamb birth fate (BFATE) codes and the presence/absence of lamb weight measurements. Six univariate animal models were tested and used to estimate variance or covariance components and the resulting direct and maternal heritabilities for NEWSUR. The models differed in the way they adjust for the effect of day of birth, the exclusion or inclusion of a litter (dam/year of birth) random effect and the application or not of a logit transformation of the phenotypes. For both the linear and logistic methods, models including the random effect of litter provided the best fit for NEWSUR according to log-likelihood values. Log-likelihoods for the linear and logistic models cannot be compared, therefore a cross-validation method was used to assess whether the logit transformation was appropriate by analyzing the predictive ability of the models. The mean square errors were slightly lower for the linear compared to the logistic model and therefore the linear model was recommended for industry use. The heritability attributed to direct effects ranged from 2 to 5.5%. A direct heritability of 5.5% resulted from a linear model without litter effect and omitting the effect of day of birth on survival, whereas a direct heritability of 2% resulted from the logistic model fitting a random litter effect. The heritability attributed to maternal genetic effects ranged from 1.9 to 7.7%. A maternal genetic heritability of 7.7% resulted from the logistic model omitting the litter effect, whereas a maternal genetic heritability of 1.9% resulted from the linear model fitting a random litter effect. The addition of the litter random effect decreased the maternal heritabilities substantially in all cases and was recommended for industry use to avoid overestimation of the maternal genetic variance. SIL has implemented NEWSUR and the associated genetic evaluation model based on information described in this paper. Industry wide implementation will enable sheep breeders to produce more accurate genetic evaluations to their commercial clients. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic parameters for direct and maternal calving ease in Walloon dairy cattle based on linear and threshold models
Vanderick, Sylvie ULg; Troch, Thibault ULg; Gillon, Alain et al

in Journal of Animal Breeding & Genetics (2014), 131(6), 513-521

Calving ease scores from Holstein dairy cattle in the Walloon Region of Belgium were analysed using univariate linear and threshold animal models. Variance components and derived genetic parameters were ... [more ▼]

Calving ease scores from Holstein dairy cattle in the Walloon Region of Belgium were analysed using univariate linear and threshold animal models. Variance components and derived genetic parameters were estimated from a dataset including 33,155 calving records. Included in the models were season, herd and sex of calf age of dam classes group of calvings interaction as fixed effects, herd year of calving, maternal permanent environment and animal direct and maternal additive genetic as random effects. Models were fitted with the genetic correlation between direct and maternal additive genetic effects either estimated or constrained to zero. Direct heritability for calving ease was about 8% with linear models and about 12% with threshold models. Maternal heritabilities were about 2% and 4%, respectively. Genetic correlation between direct and maternal additive effects was found to be not significantly different from zero. Models were compared in terms of goodness of fit and predictive ability. Criteria of comparison such as mean squared error, correlation between observed and predicted calving ease scores as well as between estimated breeding values were estimated from 85,118 calving records. The results provided few differences between linear and threshold models even though correlations between estimated breeding values from subsets of data for sires with progeny from linear model were 17% and 23 % greater for direct and maternal genetic effects, respectively, than from threshold model. For the purpose of genetic evaluation for calving ease in Walloon Holstein dairy cattle, the linear animal model without covariance between direct and maternal additive effects was found to be the best choice. [less ▲]

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See detailConsequences of Selection for Environmental Impact Traits in Dairy Cows
Kandel, Purna Bhadra ULg; Vanderick, Sylvie ULg; Vanrobays, Marie-Laure ULg et al

in Proceedings, 10th World Congress of Genetics Applied to Livestock Production (2014, August)

Genetic selection programs aiming to mitigate methane (CH4) emissions require the estimation of genetic correlations with other production and economical traits and predicted selection response. CH4 ... [more ▼]

Genetic selection programs aiming to mitigate methane (CH4) emissions require the estimation of genetic correlations with other production and economical traits and predicted selection response. CH4 intensity was predicted from Mid-infrared spectra of milk samples from Holstein cows. Genetic correlations between CH4 intensity and milk yield (MY) was -0.68, fat yield (FY) -0.13, protein yield (PY) -0.47, somatic cell score (SCS) 0.07, longevity 0.05, fertility 0.31, body condition score (BCS) 0.17. Adding 25% relative weight on CH4 intensity to the current Walloon selection index, the response to selection would reduce CH4 intensity by 24%, increase MY by 30%, FY by 17%, PY by 29%, SCS by -14%, longevity by 24% but also reduce fertility by 11% and BCS by 13%. In conclusion, environmental traits can be added without jeopardizing production traits, but energy balance related traits have to be protected. [less ▲]

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See detailContributions à l’amélioration des systèmes d’évaluations génétiques
Vanderick, Sylvie ULg; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2014)

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See detailConsequences of Selection for Environmental Impact Trait in Dairy Cows
Kandel, Purna Bhadra ULg; Vanderick, Sylvie ULg; Vanrobays, Marie-Laure ULg et al

Scientific conference (2014, February 07)

Environmental sustainability is gaining importance in dairy industry due to enteric methane (CH4) emission from dairy cows. We predicted CH4 indicator trait (CH4 intensity: CH4 g/kg of milk) from Mid ... [more ▼]

Environmental sustainability is gaining importance in dairy industry due to enteric methane (CH4) emission from dairy cows. We predicted CH4 indicator trait (CH4 intensity: CH4 g/kg of milk) from Mid-infrared spectra of milk samples and recorded milk yield. Genetic correlations between CH4 intensity and milk production traits were estimated on Holstein cows from correlations of estimated breeding values. Genetic correlations between CH4 intensity and milk yield (MY) was -0.67, fat yield (FY) -0.13, protein yield (PY) -0.46, somatic cell score (SCS) 0.02, longevity -0.07, fertility 0.31, body condition score (BCS) 0.27 and average of confirmation traits -0.23. Currently, there is no CH4 emission trait in genetic evaluation selection index. Putting an hypothetical 25% weight on CH4 intensity on current Walloon genetic evaluation selection index and proportional reduction on other selection traits, the response to selection will be reduction of CH4 emission intensity by 24%, increase in MY by 30%, FY by 17%, PY by 29%, SCS by -15%, longevity by 24%, fertility by -11%, BCS by -13% and conformation traits by 24%. In conclusion, introduction of environmental traits in current selection index will affect selection responses. As there is no economic value of these traits presently alternative methods like putting correlated traits with clear economic value (e.g. feed efficiency) in the selection objective could generate appropriate index weights. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic evaluation of calving ease for Walloon Holstein dairy cattle
Vanderick, Sylvie ULg; Troch, Thibault ULg; Gillon, Alain et al

Conference (2013, August 25)

Calving complications have an incidence on the economic profitability of dairy herds. In the Walloon Region of Belgium, calving ease data recording is being done on voluntary basis since 2000. This allows ... [more ▼]

Calving complications have an incidence on the economic profitability of dairy herds. In the Walloon Region of Belgium, calving ease data recording is being done on voluntary basis since 2000. This allows now the implementation of a genetic evaluation of Holstein dairy cattle addressing the need of dairy breeders to select bulls in order to reduce frequency of calving problems. Calving ease scores were analyzed using univariate animal linear models, which were fitted with the genetic correlation between direct and maternal additive genetic effects either estimated or constrained to zero. Variance components and related genetic parameters were estimated from a dataset including 33,155 calving records. Included in the models were fixed season effects, fixed herd effects and fixed sex of calf*age of dam classes*group of calvings interaction effects, random herd*year of calving effects, random maternal permanent environment effects, and random animal direct and maternal additive genetic effects. For both models, direct and maternal heritabilities for calving ease were about 8% and about 2%, respectively. Genetic correlation between direct and maternal additive effects was found to be non-significantly different from zero. So, an animal linear model with genetic correlation between direct and maternal effects constrained to zero was adopted for the routine genetic evaluation of calving ease for Walloon Holstein dairy cattle. This model was validated by Interbull in January 2013 and, since April 2013, the Walloon Region of Belgium has officially participated to the international MACE evaluation for calving traits. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic evaluation of calving ease for Walloon Holstein dairy cattle.
Vanderick, Sylvie ULg; Troch, Thibault ULg; Gillon, Alain et al

in Interbull Bulletin (2013), 47

Calving complications have an incidence on the economic profitability of dairy herds. In the Walloon Region of Belgium, calving ease data recording is being done on voluntary basis since 2000. This allows ... [more ▼]

Calving complications have an incidence on the economic profitability of dairy herds. In the Walloon Region of Belgium, calving ease data recording is being done on voluntary basis since 2000. This allows now the implementation of a genetic evaluation of Holstein dairy cattle addressing the need of dairy breeders to select bulls in order to reduce frequency of calving problems. Calving ease scores were analyzed using univariate animal linear models, which were fitted with the genetic correlation between direct and maternal additive genetic effects either estimated or constrained to zero. Variance components and related genetic parameters were estimated from a dataset including 33,155 calving records. Included in the models were fixed season effects, fixed herd effects and fixed sex of calf*age of dam classes*group of calvings interaction effects, random herd*year of calving effects, random maternal permanent environment effects, and random animal direct and maternal additive genetic effects. For both models, direct and maternal heritabilities for calving ease were about 8% and about 2%, respectively. Genetic correlation between direct and maternal additive effects was found to be non-significantly different from zero. So, an animal linear model with genetic correlation between direct and maternal effects constrained to zero was adopted for the routine genetic evaluation of calving ease for Walloon Holstein dairy cattle. This model was validated by Interbull in January 2013 and, since April 2013, the Walloon Region of Belgium has officially participated to the international MACE evaluation for calving traits. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of a genomic evaluation for milk production for a local bovine breed
Colinet, Frédéric ULg; Vandenplas, Jérémie ULg; Faux, Pierre ULg et al

in Book of Abstracts of the 64th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science (2013, August)

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See detailDirect use of MACE EBV in the Walloon single-step Bayesian genomic evaluation system
Vandenplas, Jérémie ULg; Colinet, Frédéric ULg; Faux, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2013, July), 96(E-Supplement),

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (13 ULg)