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See detailPaleoenvironmental implications in the dried lake sediments (Amik Lake, Southern Turkey)
El Ouahabi, Meriam ULg; Hubert, Aurelia ULg; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline ULg et al

Poster (2016, July)

The Amik Basin in the Eastern Mediterranean region has been continuously inhabited since 6000 – 7000 BC. The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Amik Lake located in the central part of the ... [more ▼]

The Amik Basin in the Eastern Mediterranean region has been continuously inhabited since 6000 – 7000 BC. The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Amik Lake located in the central part of the basin. Our objective is to constrain major paleo-environmental changes in the area over the last 4000 years and to unravel possible human impacts on the sedimentation. A diverse array of complementary methods was applied on the 6 m long record. Mineralogical (XRD), and geochemical (XRF) analyses were performed. The age of the record is constrained combining radionuclide and radiocarbon dating. A high sedimentation rate of 0.12 cm/yr was inferred at the studied site. The 4000 years (since ~1800 BC) long record shows that significant fluctuations of the lake level and the riverine system inflow into the Amik Lake occurred. The Late Bronze lowstand led to punctual dryings of the lake at the end of the Bronze/Iron Age transition. At that time, the rivers yielded a large terrigenous input linked to strong soil erosion related mainly to deforestation and exploitation of mineral resources. During the Roman and later periods, upland soils were partly depleted and the riverine system completely transformed by channelization (anthropic) that led to a marshification of the Amik Basin [1]. Chemical and mineralogical composition of sediments is quite diversified reflecting the significant geological variation of drainage basins. Periods with strong aggradation linked to major increase in erosion were identified and characterized by high amount of Cr, Ni and Zr. Levels relatively rich in fluorite, richterite, enstatite, hornblende and chrysotile are a result of the erosion of the ophiolitic rocks from the surrounding Amanos Mountains. These levels are interpreted as periods of relatively high physical erosion, while more humid periods led to more intensive weathering. Consequently, the dominance of kaolinite, muscovite/illite and talc indicates a climate with contrasting seasons. During the most recent period a marked increase in terrigenous minerals associated with a rise in dolomite indicates ungoing erosion as well as the drying-out of the lake. [1] T.J. Wilkinson, L. Rayne, Water History, 2, 115-144 (2010). [less ▲]

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See detailChemical and mineralogical proxies of erosion episodes in the dried lake sediments (Amik Lake, Southern Turkey): paleoenvironmental implications
El Ouahabi, Meriam ULg; Hubert, Aurelia ULg; Lebeau, Héléne et al

Poster (2016, April 17)

The Amik Basin in the Eastern Mediterranean region has been continuously occupied since 6000-7000 BC. The landscape has sustained with highly variable anthropic pressure culminating during the Late Roman ... [more ▼]

The Amik Basin in the Eastern Mediterranean region has been continuously occupied since 6000-7000 BC. The landscape has sustained with highly variable anthropic pressure culminating during the Late Roman Period when the Antioch city reached its golden age. The basin also sustained a high seismic activity (M≥7) as it is a releasing step-over along the Dead Sea Fault. The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Amik Lake occupying the central part of the Basin. Our objective is to constrain major paleo-environmental changes in the area over the last 4000 years and to unravel possible human impacts on the sedimentation. A diverse array of complementary methods was applied on the 6 m long record. High resolution of mineralogical (XRD) and geochemical (XRF) analyses were performed. Quantitative mineralogical phases of sediments by the Rietveld method were computed using Topaz software. The age of the record is constrained combining radionuclide and radiocarbon dating, and checked using the correlation between the earthquake history and rapidly deposited layer identified. A high sedimentation rate of 0.12 cm/yr was inferred at the coring site. The 4000 years old record shows that significant fluctuations of the lake level and the riverine system inflow into the Amik Lake occurred. The Late Bronze lowstand leaded to punctual dryings of the lake at the end of the Bronze/Iron transition marked by the collapse of the Hittite Empire and during the Dark ages. At that time, the riverine was carrying a large terrigenous input linked to strong soil erosion related to deforestation, exploitation of mineral resources and the beginning of upland cultivation. During the Roman Period and in the later periods, upland soils were partly depleted and the riverine system completely transformed by channelization that leaded to a mashification of the Amik Basin. Chemical and mineralogical composition of sediments is quite diversified reflecting the significant geological variation of drainage basins. Abundant calcareous minerals, especially calcite, aragonite, dolomite and small amount of wollastonite characterize the different sedimentary levels recorded in the lake. Levels relatively rich in fluorite, richerite, enstatite, and wollastonite are a result of the erosion of the ophiolitic rocks from the surrounding Amanos Mountains. These levels are interpreted as corresponding to relatively high erosive periods, while more humid periods lead to more intensive weathering and consequently to the dominance of kaolinite, muscovite/illite and talc more advanced in the relative stability scale, indicating a climate with contrasting seasons. During the most recent Period a marked increase in terrigeneous minerals associated with a rise in dolomite indicates ungoing erosion as well as the drying-out of the lake. [less ▲]

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See detailNouvelles données sur un pigment noir d’origine cambrienne, utilisé au Paléolithique moyen et découvert dans la grotte Scladina (Andenne, Belgique)
Bonjean, D; Vanbrabant, Y; Abrams, G et al

in Notae Praehistoricae (2015), 35

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See detailTwo differentiation trends and parent magmas at Calbuco volcano (CSVZ, Chille)
Montalbano, Salvatrice ULg; Schiano, Pierre; Cluzel, Nicolas et al

Poster (2015, August 19)

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See detailOrigine des fortes teneurs en fluorure dans les eaux souterraines du socle précambrien du Bénin central
Tossou, Yao ULg; Gesels, Julie ULg; Alassane, Abdoulkarim et al

Scientific conference (2015, June 25)

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See detailThe Sept Iles Intrusive Suite, Quebec, Canada
Namur, Olivier; Higgins, Michael; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline ULg

in Charlier, Bernard; Namur, Olivier; Latypov, Rais (Eds.) et al Layered Intrusions (2015)

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See detailMagmatic processes under Quizapu volcano, Chile, identified from geochemical and textural studies
Higgins, Michael; Voos, Stéphanie; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline ULg

in Contributions to Mineralogy & Petrology (2015), 170

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See detailMelting of the primitive martian mantle at 0.5-2.2 GPa and the origin of basalts and alkaline rocks on Mars
Collinet, M.; Médard, E.; Charlier, Bernard ULg et al

in Earth and Planetary Science Letters (2015), 427

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See detailA new Cambrian black pigment used during the late Middle Palaeolithic discovered at Scladina Cave (Andenne, Belgium)
Bonjean, Dominique ULg; Vanbrabant, Yves; Abrams, Gregory et al

in Journal of Archaeological Science (2015), 55

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See detailThe Amik Lake in Southern Turkey over the last 4000 years, a new paleoseismological record of ruptures along the Northern Dead Sea Fault
Hubert, Aurelia ULg; El Ouahabi, Meriam ULg; Lebeau, Hèlène et al

Poster (2014, June 30)

The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Amik Lake occupying the central part of a pull-apart basin. The Basin is crossed by The Dead Sea Fault (DSF), a major neotectonic structure in the Middle ... [more ▼]

The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Amik Lake occupying the central part of a pull-apart basin. The Basin is crossed by The Dead Sea Fault (DSF), a major neotectonic structure in the Middle East extending from the Red Sea in the south to the East Anatolian Fault Zone in the north. Around the Amik Basin, continuous human occupation is attested since 6000-7000 BC. Indeed the low-lying Amuq plain is covered by tell settlements first explored by Robert Braidwood in the 1930s. Our objective in this presentation is to look at major paleo-environmental changes recorded in the Amik Lake over the last 4000 years and in particular its potential paleoseimic sedimentary record. The lake has been drained and progressively dried up since the mid-50s so that it is not watered during the summer season and constitutes a unique opportunity to collect sediment records. Sediments were collected at 1 cm to 2 cm intervals in a trench and in cores up to a depth of 5 meters in the clay deposits. A diverse array of complementary methods is applied to study the records: magnetic susceptibility, grain size, organic matter and inorganic carbon (L.O.I), XRD mineralogy, XRF geochemistry, carbon geochemistry and clay mineralogy. The age of the record is constrained combining radionuclide and radiocarbon dating. The sedimentary record shows large earthquake related structural disturbances and smaller siliciclastic sedimentary events. The siliciclastic input would be related to enhanced detritical sedimentation related to earthquake shaking. The latter is further investigated looking at intensities and shake maps related to the last 19th century M>7 earthquakes in the area and landslide prone area in the lake catchment. [less ▲]

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See detailFe and Mg Isotope Fractionation in Olivine from the NWA 1068 Shergottite
Collinet, Max ULg; Charlier, Bernard ULg; Namur, Olivier et al

Conference (2014, June 09)

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See detailA geochemical and petrological study of the Late Cretaceous banatites from the Apuseni Mountains, Romania
Vander Auwera, Jacqueline ULg; Berza, Tudor; Dupont, Alain et al

Poster (2014, April)

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See detailAlkaline Primary Melts from the Primitive Mantle of Mars
Collinet, Max ULg; Médard, Etienne; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline ULg et al

Poster (2014, March)

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See detailPaleoenvironmental record of the Amik Basin (Amuq Plain, Southern Turkey) over the last 4000 years
Hubert, Aurelia ULg; El Ouahabi, Meriam ULg; Lebeau, Hélène ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 04)

Continous human occupation is attested in the Amik Basin since 6000-7000 BC. The low-lying Amuq plain is covered by tell settlements first explored by Robert Braidwood in the 1930s. The Basin also is ... [more ▼]

Continous human occupation is attested in the Amik Basin since 6000-7000 BC. The low-lying Amuq plain is covered by tell settlements first explored by Robert Braidwood in the 1930s. The Basin also is crossed by The Dead Sea Fault (DSF), a major neotectonic structure in the Middle East extending from the Red Sea in the south to Turkey in the north. The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Amik Lake occupying the central part of the Basin. Our objective is to constrain major paleo-environmental changes in the area over the last 4000 years and assess possible human impact. The lake has been drained and progressively dried up since the mid-50s so that it is not watered during the summer season and constitutes a unique opportunity to collect sediment records. Sediments were collected at 1 cm to 2 cm intervals in a trench and in cores up to a depth of 5 meters in the clay deposits. A diverse array of complementary methods is applied to study the records: magnetic susceptibility, grain size, organic matter and inorganic carbon (L.O.I), XRD mineralogy, XRF geochemistry, carbon geochemistry. The age of the record is constrained combining radionuclide and radiocarbon dating. The record shows two intense phases of soil erosion with enrichments in Chromium and Nickel. The most recent erosion phase might be linked with enhanced development during the Roman and the growth of the Antioch City. The oldest one would occur around 3000 BC. The record also allows reconstructing past lake level variations and discusses the results in comparison with variations of the Dead Sea. [less ▲]

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