References of "Toussaint, Geoffrey"
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See detailBeliefs in the population about cracking sounds produced during spinal manipulation
Demoulin, Christophe ULiege; Baeri, Damien; TOUSSAINT, Geoffrey ULiege et al

in Joint Bone Spine (in press)

Objectives: To examine beliefs about cracking sounds heard during highvelocity lowamplitude (HVLA) thrust spinal manipulation in individuals with and without personal experience of this technique. Methods ... [more ▼]

Objectives: To examine beliefs about cracking sounds heard during highvelocity lowamplitude (HVLA) thrust spinal manipulation in individuals with and without personal experience of this technique. Methods: We included 100 individuals. Among them, 60 had no history of spinal manipulation, including 40whowereasymptomatic with or without a past history of spinal pain and 20whohad nonspecific spinal pain. The remaining 40 patients had a history of spinal manipulation;amongthem, 20 were asymptomatic and 20 had spinal pain. Participants attended a oneonone interview during which they completed a questionnaire about their history of spinal manipulation and their beliefs regarding sounds heard during spinal manipulation. Results: Mean age was 43.5±15.4 years. The sounds were ascribed to vertebral repositioning by 49% of participants and to friction between two vertebras by 23% of participants; only 9% of participants correctly ascribed the sound to the release of gas. The sound was mistakenly considered to indicate successful spinal manipulation by 40% of participants. No differences in beliefs were found between the groups with and without a history of spinal manipulation. Conclusions: Certain beliefs have documented adverse effects. This study showed a high prevalence of unfounded beliefs regarding spinal manipulation. These beliefs deserve greater attention from healthcare providers, particularly those who practice spinal manipulation. [less ▲]

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See detailBeliefs in the general population regarding the "cracking" or "popping" noise from spine thrust manipulation
Demoulin, Christophe ULiege; Baeri, D.; TOUSSAINT, Geoffrey ULiege et al

in Vleeming, Andry (Ed.) 9th Interdisciplinary World Congress on Low Back and Pelvic Girdle Pain - Progress in Evidence based diagnosis and treatment (2016, November)

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See detailKnowledge and beliefs of health care professionals performing thrust spinal manipulations on these techniques: A preliminary study
Demoulin, Christophe ULiege; TOUSSAINT, Geoffrey ULiege; Grosdent, Stéphanie ULiege et al

in Vleeming, Andry (Ed.) 9th Interdisciplinary World Congress on Low Back and Pelvic Girdle Pain - Progress in Evidence based diagnosis and treatment (2016, November)

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See detailCroyances de la population générale au sujet des manipulations vertébrales
Demoulin, Christophe ULiege; Baeri, D.; TOUSSAINT, Geoffrey ULiege et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2015, December), 82S

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See detailPhysiotherapy Intervention for Joint Hypermobility in Three Cases with Heritable Connective Tissue Disorders
Kaux, Jean-François ULiege; Foidart-Dessalle, Marguerite ULiege; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULiege et al

in Journal of Musculoskeletal Pain (2010), 18(3), 254-60

Introduction: In Joint Hypermobility Syndromes, chronic pain is the most disabling symptom. Its origin can be multiple (i.e. subluxations, sprains, pathologies of tendons, ligaments, peripheral nerves ... [more ▼]

Introduction: In Joint Hypermobility Syndromes, chronic pain is the most disabling symptom. Its origin can be multiple (i.e. subluxations, sprains, pathologies of tendons, ligaments, peripheral nerves, multiple operations). The goal of this article was intended to discuss appropriate physiotherapy in hyperlax patients. Patients and Method: The recovery process was analyzed in three cases (Marfan Syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and Osteogenesis Imperfecta). Hypermobility was assessed using the Brighton scale, pain using the Visual Analogue Scale and quality of life using the Medical Outcome Study Short Form-36. Bone density was evaluated by QDR X-ray absorptiometry. We emphasized that it was important to avoid stretching and to train the patient within a controlled range of motion. Submaximal eccentric exercises within a safe range of motion were incorporated to increase the active control of the joint positioning. Thus, in one patient, isokinetic rehabilitation was successfully undertaken. Each treatment had to be adapted to the individual patient and had to include specific home exercises. Conclusion: In each case, physiotherapy gave good results in relation to pain, quality of life and stability of rehabilitated joints. Safety must be assured and specific evaluations such osteodensitometry, cardiac explorations and interventions of bracing, proprioceptive and functional strengthening can be very helpful. [less ▲]

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See detailContribution to an adapted physiotherapy in the hyperlaxity syndromes
Kaux, Jean-François ULiege; Foidart-Dessalle, Marguerite ULiege; Toussaint, Geoffrey ULiege et al

in First Annual Congress (of the new style) of the Royal Belgian Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (RBSPRM) (2005, December 02)

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