References of "Thunus, Sophie"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe role of meetings in building modern organisational governance systems - outlining a sociological approach to meetings
Thunus, Sophie ULg

Conference (2016, September 21)

By relying on empirical and micro level analyses of the implementation of a Belgian reform of mental healthcare delivery, this paper shows that inter-organisational and interinstitutional meetings might ... [more ▼]

By relying on empirical and micro level analyses of the implementation of a Belgian reform of mental healthcare delivery, this paper shows that inter-organisational and interinstitutional meetings might be conceived as key sites for the realisation of public policy objectives; i.e. sites where both the meaning of policy objectives and the social systems through which they are enacted are (re)defined. This paper is based on a case study on the implementation process of the ongoing Belgian reform of mental healthcare delivery, called “Reform 107”. Reform 107 is designed to shift mental healthcare organisation from the model of residential psychiatry, which is centred on medical hospital care, to community psychiatry that implies, instead, psychosocial home and/or ambulatory care. Policymakers conceived this shift through the development of local mental healthcare networks, which are defined as concrete partnerships between local, residential and ambulatory care providers and social and employment public services. The first stage in the implementation process consisted in four-year exploratory projects through which local actors were expected to refine the community care model proposed by policymakers. By asking local actors to participate in the adaptation of the model to local realities, policymakers intended to improve their own knowledge of local mental healthcare systems on the one hand, and to interest local actors in a reform that challenges their institutional interests on the other. Our analyses of the implementation of Reform 107 focused on three local exploratory projects and their monitoring by federal public health authorities. The empirical material was collected through semi-structured interviews (N=62) with policymakers and local actors, direct observations of the meetings between local mental health practitioners responsible for the reform’s implementation (N=65) and documentary analyses, including policy and (local) organisational documents. This material was first analysed by relying on a sociological frame of analysis based on the French sociology of organisations (Friedberg, 1997) and the interactionist sociology (Abbott, 2005; Bucher & Strauss, 1961; Corbin & Strauss, 2008). The resulting sociological account (Thunus, 2015) stressed that local models of governance, power struggles as well as professional knowledge significantly impacted on the development of mental healthcare networks. It also highlighted the use of new techniques by federal public health authorities to manage the reform implementation. Those techniques, including the multiplication of meetings with local actors, direct coaching of local projects’ leaders as well as training of front-line mental health professionals, were conceived as means to oppose strategies of resistance usually enacted by psychiatric hospitals (S Thunus & Schoenaers, 2012). This paper offers to refine this analysis by focusing on the specific role played by meetings in policy implementation, based on a conception of “the practice of policy-making”(Richard Freeman, Griggs, & Boaz, 2011). It draws on the observation that, though researches on policy implementation increasingly evoke meetings as part of the policy process, they do not properly address the role played by meeting in influencing, orienting and possibly (re)defining policy reforms. Indeed, following the recognition of the need for dealing with complex and uncertain problems, or wicked problems (Roberts, 2000), by relying on procedural policy instruments (Howlett, 2000) and collaborative governance (Emerson, Nabatchi, & Balogh, 2011), numerous researches focused on policy networks, hybrid forums (Callon, Lascoumes, & Barthes, 2001) and special committees whose activities involve meetings. However, by considering meetings as a part of/a tool for larger processes as problems solving, crisis resolution or decision-making, those researches made them unproblematic means to achieve predefined and external objectives. The problems resulting from a “meetings as a tool approach” (Schwartzman, 1989) are twofold. On the one hand, it seems to ignore that, by bringing different and specialised expertise together, meetings induce social, cognitive and technical challenges. Those challenges, including the sharing of specialised knowledge and harsh negotiations between actors defending institutional interests and professional jurisdictions, make meetings conflicting and problematic arenas (Cohen, March, & Olsen, 1972). On the other, when conceived as rational means to reach external objectives, meetings often appear as disappointing and pointless. Based on this observation, Schwartzman (1989) proposed to stop seeing meeting as part of larger processes as decision-making (as a tool), to focus on what meetings actually do to the organisation or social context in which they take place (i.e. to consider meetings as a topic). By drawing on Schwartzman’s invitation to make meetings a research topic, we propose to ask the question of what inter-organisational and interinstitutional meetings actually did to the Belgian mental health care reform. We suggest addressing that question by relying on a conception of policy-making as a practice of a special kind (R Freeman, Griggs, & Boaz, 2011). This conception insists on the role played by policy practices as meeting and talks in determining policy objectives and creating groups supporting them. Accordingly, we will focus on social actions and interactions unfolding through meetings and talks, to see how they use and produce knowledge, instruments and relationships both embodying and reshaping their environment. Finally, by inviting us to bracket the explicit objectives of the observed meetings (e.g. providing policymakers with an operational definition of care functions included in the proposed community model), this approach will enable us to see what inter-organisational and interinstitutional meetings actually do to policy reforms. That is, generating performances (Goffman, 1959) supporting collective enactments of new social and professional roles and artefacts that (re) constitute the meaning of the reform and the associated social system. Viewing meeting as a concrete policy practice thus helps to stress that they contribute to durable and deep change in their social environment, precisely by generating talks that largely exceed/displace their explicit mandate. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeeting in Brackets - Devising Belgian Mental Health Policies through Inter-organisational Meetings
Thunus, Sophie ULg

Conference (2016, September)

Object: this paper analyses inter-organisational meetings held in response to a reform of the Belgian mental health care system. It proposes to shift the researcher’s attention from the instrumental ... [more ▼]

Object: this paper analyses inter-organisational meetings held in response to a reform of the Belgian mental health care system. It proposes to shift the researcher’s attention from the instrumental function attributed to meetings to the role they actually play in this reform. Aims: based on the observation that meetings frequently failed to reach their instrumental outcome, this paper first asks which other roles meetings might play and how. Second, it suggests that the concept of bracketing might be helpful in perceiving, describing and analysing the roles played by meetings. Methods: this paper relies on empirical material collected through semi-structured interviews, direct observation and documentary analyse. Excerpts from interviews and field notes of observation are used as a basis for analysing 4 specific meetings. These meetings have been selected according to their relevance to the research question of the role played by meetings and a set of criteria relating to the meeting type, participants, topic and context. Results: this paper demonstrates that, next to their instrumental function, meetings play at least three complementary roles, which are defined as expressive, representative and performative. It argues that these three roles of meetings are better understood by using the concept of bracketing in three ways: as a methodological, descriptive and analytical tool. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailMeeting in brackets
Thunus, Sophie ULg

Conference (2016, May 06)

In this presentation, I suggest studying "the meetings" for themselves, by considering them as a topic for research and not as tool for doing researches on other topics as problem-solving and policy ... [more ▼]

In this presentation, I suggest studying "the meetings" for themselves, by considering them as a topic for research and not as tool for doing researches on other topics as problem-solving and policy-making. By drawing on a sociological research on a Belgian reform of mental healthcare delivery, I argue that the concept of bracketing might be used to identify the forms and to analyse the various roles played by meetings, or what the meetings do to the organisational and policy work. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeeting for Reorganising Belgian Mental Healthcare Delivery
Thunus, Sophie ULg

Conference (2015, September 15)

This communication provides in-depth analyses of five local meetings between mental health practitioners. Those meetings took place in response to a Belgian reform of mental health care delivery, from ... [more ▼]

This communication provides in-depth analyses of five local meetings between mental health practitioners. Those meetings took place in response to a Belgian reform of mental health care delivery, from January to June 2012. Mental health practitioners intended those meeting to agree on new work procedures used in activities of promotion of mental healthcare. This communication analyses the discussions and interaction processes through which mental health practitioners finally succeeded in agreeing on new work procedures. It particularly emphasizes that those procedures resulted from the very situated and contingent assemblage of different ideas, interests, and evidence expressed by the participants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailChanging Belgian Mental Healthcare Delivery - Enacting Policy Learning
Thunus, Sophie ULg; Schoenaers, Frédéric ULg

Conference (2015, July)

Based on sociological analyses of Belgian mental healthcare reforms, this paper demonstrates how policy learning occurs in that field –through the process of devising policy change – and how it impacts on ... [more ▼]

Based on sociological analyses of Belgian mental healthcare reforms, this paper demonstrates how policy learning occurs in that field –through the process of devising policy change – and how it impacts on policy change, such as mediated through collective action and social interactions taking place in relation to policy change. It first defines coalitions of actors, institutional power struggles and conflicts of paradigms representing barriers and opportunities for policy change. Then, by using the phenomenology of Embodied, Inscribed and Enacted Knowledge in Policy (Freeman & Sturdy, 2014), it identifies policy learning resulting from the process of preparing and devising the ongoing “Reform 107”. By providing means to attend to the transformation of policy-relevant knowledge through social interactions, the phenomenology enabled us to identify three ways of learning (by assembling, meeting and anticipating), which are associated to three types of changes in mental health policies (negotiated change, innovation and strategic change). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)
See detailChangements dans les institutions belges de psychiatrie et de santé mentale: clés de compréhension sociologiques
Thunus, Sophie ULg

Speech/Talk (2015)

« Changements dans les institutions belges de psychiatrie et de santé mentale : clés de compréhension sociologique. » Cette présentation comporte trois parties: Premièrement, la définition d’une approche ... [more ▼]

« Changements dans les institutions belges de psychiatrie et de santé mentale : clés de compréhension sociologique. » Cette présentation comporte trois parties: Premièrement, la définition d’une approche écologique et processuelle du changement dans le système de la santé mentale en Belgique. Cette définition résulte d’une analyse socio-historique des réformes passées et récentes, de 1960 -2005. La seconde partie consiste à opérationnaliser l’approche écologique et processuelle afin de l'appliquer à l’analyse des changements en cours. Deux types de changements sont analysés: d'une part, au niveau politique, la conception du Guide « vers de meilleurs soins de santé mentale par la réalisation des réseaux et circuits de soins»; d'autre part, au niveau des organisations de soins de santé mentale, l'implémentation de la nouvelle politique de santé mentale dans deux systèmes de soins locaux aux propriétés sociologiques différentes. A partir de cette analyse des changements en cours, la conclusion propose des pistes de réflexion pour l’amélioration de la conduite du changement dans le système des soins de santé mentale en Belgique. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe System for Adressing Personal Problems-From medicalisation to Socialisation: Shifts in Belgian Psychiatric and Mental Health Institutions
Thunus, Sophie ULg

Doctoral thesis (2015)

My PhD thesis related the growth of a large social system devoted to the treatment of personal problems; i.e. problems successively labelled as madness, mental illness and mental health problems, from the ... [more ▼]

My PhD thesis related the growth of a large social system devoted to the treatment of personal problems; i.e. problems successively labelled as madness, mental illness and mental health problems, from the early fifties to the present days. That system involved heterogeneous networks of actors, including scientific experts, established professions, social movements, policy makers, services users and international organisations; instruments and knowledge ranging from psychoanalytical theories to biological knowledge and models of governance. It meant to explain how institutional change happened in that complex social system, by studying past and ongoing reforms, considered as interrelated steps towards complete paradigm shift, including shifting policy means, policy objectives and social organisation. By relying on in-depth analyses of five past reforms, it conceptualised the system as composed of interrelated ecologies, corresponding to different kinds of knowledge of personal problems, whose development was directed by protective and expansion strategies used by two coalitions of actors, holding different kinds of resources to influence the change process. The traditional coalition was embedded in the Belgian institutional system; it referred to medical knowledge of personal problems; and held many institutions delivering residential treatments. By contrast, the reformist coalition was connected to international professional and policy networks stimulating change in OECD-mental health systems; it referred to practical knowledge of social psychiatry and evidence produced by international organisations as the World Health Organisation; and it held non-profit associations delivering community treatments. Cross-regulations exerted through joint-participation of those coalitions in successive reforms caused rapid changes in the system’s structural configuration while hindering change in its social organisation. Thus, we suggested thinking of the issue of change in the system as consisting in setting conditions in which the reformist coalition might extensively use its resources in conducting a new reform starting in 2010. By relying on that assumption, I presented three case studies analysing the devising of that reform at the policy level and its implementing through local networks. Those case studies drew attention to the kinds of knowledge used by key actors and to the way in which they used it in joint-attempts to take the leadership of the reform. Three main findings resulted from those case studies. First, the designing of the policy guide framing the reform consisted in assembling different kinds of knowledge together, including policy learning achieved through past changes in the system and knowledge of alternative care models implemented in OECD-countries, in a way that encouraged sustained enactments of knowledge specific to the reformist coalition, while decreasing the relevance of resources specific to the traditional coalition. Second, local meetings caused by the implementing of the reform enabled adaptations of knowledge embodied by the participants, i.e. multiple actors representing different ecologies and members of one of the two coalitions, to enacted knowledge, i.e. knowledge collectively produced by thinking about concrete means to implement the reform locally. Third, enacted knowledge caused, in turn, adaptations of the care model inscribed in the policy guide to local particularities. Those adaptations did not prevent, however, the global philosophy of the new reform, inspired by social psychiatry, from pervading in local networks, among other by being inscribed in operational documents resulting from meetings. Thus, by following the policy guide through local networks where it was translated into concrete practices, I have been able to indicate new directions in the global process of change in the system, towards a complete paradigm shift, from medical to social psychiatry, and to highlight social and learning processes making it possible. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 126 (38 ULg)
See detailUn collectif en construction : le cas du CRISdoc
Bastard, Joséphine ULg; Beuker, Laura ULg; Colemans, Julie ULg et al

Conference (2015, March 10)

Cette communication vise à s’interroger sur la construction de l’identité professionnelle du chercheur en sciences humaines et sociales à travers la construction d’un collectif spontané émanant de jeunes ... [more ▼]

Cette communication vise à s’interroger sur la construction de l’identité professionnelle du chercheur en sciences humaines et sociales à travers la construction d’un collectif spontané émanant de jeunes chercheurs : le CRISdoc. Le Centre de Recherche et d’Interventions Sociologiques (CRIS) est un laboratoire rattaché à l’Institut des Sciences Humaines et Sociales de l’Université de Liège (Belgique). Créé dans le courant des années 1990, le CRIS s’est développé au départ d’un petit groupe de chercheurs mus par une même conception de la sociologie ; héritage de leurs liens étroits avec le Centre de Sociologie des Organisations (CSO). Ce laboratoire s’est progressivement étendu et diversifié en intégrant notamment des chercheurs en criminologie. Il est composé aujourd’hui de six académiques, deux chercheurs post-doctoraux, trois assistants et douze doctorants, ainsi que d’une multitude de chercheurs associés. Au sein du laboratoire, un groupe de travail baptisé « CRISdoc » a récemment vu le jour. Il est composé d’une dizaine de chercheurs (doctorants et post-doctorants). Il s’agit de comprendre les raisons d’être d’un tel collectif, de décrire les caractéristiques de ses membres et les objectifs inhérents à cette démarche. Le métier de chercheur, et particulièrement le processus doctoral, est un travail essentiellement solitaire. A l’exception des interactions avec son promoteur, au cours desquelles les lignes directrice de la thèse s’élaborent progressivement, le doctorant réalise son terrain seul, et traite seul de son objet de recherche. Notre lieu de travail nous rapproche cependant. Quoique nous soyons rarement tous présents, étant donné les impératifs de notre travail de terrain, nous partageons un même couloir. Celui-ci est le point de départ d’autres rencontres informelles Bien qu’étant rarement présents tous au même moment, du fait de nos impératifs empiriques et du fonctionnement relativement informel du service, nous entretenons des relations interpersonnelles régulières, à travers des activités au contenu professionnelles (séminaires, formations) mais surtout extraprofessionnelles (temps de midi, repas organisés par l’institution ou par nos soins, apéritifs improvisés, etc.). Ces échanges sont la preuve que nous ne sommes pas seuls. Pour autant, ils n’offrent que de rares occasions de procéder à de réels échanges de fond structurés. Depuis plusieurs mois, de nombreuses discussions informelles ont traité de cet aspect, et du fait qu’au-delà de nos différences apparentes, nous vivons en partie les mêmes expériences, questionnements, ou obstacles. En outre, nous partageons régulièrement, sans forcément y penser ou en parler, des cadres théoriques ou des méthodes de travail similaires. Peu à peu, l’idée de se réunir autour de ces différents sujets a commencé à germer. Le premier défi auquel nous devions faire face était étroitement lié à l’hétérogénéité du collectif. Nos profils sont, en effet, contrastés et de nombreuses caractéristiques sont à prendre en compte : l’âge (de 24 à 35 ans), la formation (sociologie, gestion des ressources humaines, sciences du travail, sciences politiques, langues romanes, histoire, droit, gestion de projets), le promoteur (cinq différents, avec leurs propres sensibilités théoriques), le type de recherche (fondamentale ou commanditée), le financement (FNRS, FRFC, ARC, PAI, BRAIN, assistanat), le champ de recherche (police, justice, enseignement, santé, emploi), l’expérience (début/milieu/fin de thèse, post-doctorat, contrats de recherche antérieurs), etc. Comment dès lors parvenir à créer un espace commun de travail et de réflexion ? Notre première réunion formelle était destinée à délimiter les contours et les objectifs de réunions futures. Malgré cette diversité, notre première rencontre a permis de distinguer une série de thématiques communes et de fixer un calendrier afin d’échanger sur différents sujets tels que l’organisation du travail empirique, l’articulation entre les apports théoriques et empiriques, la rupture épistémologique et le retour aux acteurs concernés, ou encore la distanciation par rapport au projet initial et au promoteur. À raison d’une rencontre par mois environ, réparties sur la présente année académique, nous procédons à un partage de connaissances, d’expériences et de conseils. Le séminaire « CRISdoc » est né. Reste la question des objectifs poursuivis, individuels et collectifs, explicites et implicites, d’une telle démarche. Tout d’abord, nous aspirons pour la plupart à partager nos questionnements, nos expériences afin de surmonter les obstacles rencontrés ou plus simplement de parfaire notre apprentissage du métier de chercheur. Nous considérons notre hétérogénéité comme une richesse dont chacun peut se nourrir individuellement : les plus expérimentés partageant leur vécu, les plus jeunes apportant un regard neuf. Ensuite, le CRISdoc remplit une série de fonctions secondaires, mais non moins importantes car il permet de partager ses doutes, craintes, déceptions, impasses, de relativiser ou démystifier la recherche, le tout dans une ambiance conviviale, peu contraignante et en dehors de toute pression ou jugement hiérarchique. Enfin, la question du collectif en lui-même reste ouverte : au-delà de la rencontre de nos intérêts individuels, la démarche participe-t-elle à l’émergence d’un véritable collectif, d’une identité « doctorant » au sein du service ? Ou ce partage n’est-il qu’une occasion supplémentaire de renforcer le caractère individuel de notre métier ? S’il est actuellement difficile d’y répondre de façon précise, ces interrogations conservent toute notre attention. Dès lors, cette communication vise à s’interroger de manière descriptive et réflexive sur ce processus de construction de l’identité professionnelle à un niveau individuel et collectif. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (27 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLa réforme des soins de santé mentale en Belgique: pas complètement convergents, mais concrètement interdépendants
Thunus, Sophie ULg

Conference (2015, January 08)

Dans cet article, nous retracerons d’abord les grandes lignes des évolutions des associations d’usagers et de proches en santé mentale, en Europe et en Belgique. Ensuite, nous présenterons une ... [more ▼]

Dans cet article, nous retracerons d’abord les grandes lignes des évolutions des associations d’usagers et de proches en santé mentale, en Europe et en Belgique. Ensuite, nous présenterons une expérimentation politique dans le champ de la santé mentale en Belgique, qui a été l’occasion, pour les associations d’usagers et de proches, d’institutionnaliser leur participation. A cette occasion, nous évoquerons les motifs politiques à l’origine du projet de participation (acte 1) confié par les autorités publiques belges aux associations, ses modalités, et son implémentation au sein d’un dispositif d’action publique impliquant également des experts professionnels et scientifiques. Dans un troisième temps, nous nous intéresserons à la poursuite du projet participation dans le cadre de la réforme actuelle de la santé mentale et de la psychiatrie. Nous décrirons les modalités d’implémentation du projet (acte 2) et les nouveaux défis qui se posent aux associations, au fur-et-à-mesure de l’augmentation et de la visibilité accrue de leur participation aux niveaux institutionnels et politiques. En conclusion, nous soulignerons le caractère contingent de l’émergence et de la stabilisation de la participation en Belgique. Nous verrons que ce caractère contingent est à l’origine de fortes interdépendances entre le développement de la participation, des projets politiques spécifiques et trajectoires individuelles particulières. Cette interdépendance génère à son tour des enjeux spécifiques, pour les associations et les représentants des usagers, en termes identitaires et de légitimité. Nous soulignerons en outre le caractère incrémental du processus par lequel les associations stabilisent leur discours, leur méthodologie et leur intervention concrète dans la prise de décision aux niveaux macro et micro. A cet égard, mettrons en évidence l’importance de la production continue de documents (recommandations, questionnaires, …) stabilisant les éléments-clé de ce discours et permettant aux experts par le vécu de le porter en différents endroits, au sein des institutions des soins et dans la sphère politique. Finalement, nous envisagerons l’hypothèse de la professionnalisation des représentant(e)s des associations et des représentants des usagers, tout en soulignant les enjeux personnels et structurels associés à cette professionnalisation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAu cœur de la réforme des soins de santé mentale en Belgique : les coordinateurs de réseau
Thunus, Sophie ULg; Lorquet, Nadège ULg

in SociologieS (2014)

Inside the Belgian reform of mental health care delivery: network coordinators This article analyses the Belgian reform of mental health care delivery as a two steps-translation (Callon 1986): the ... [more ▼]

Inside the Belgian reform of mental health care delivery: network coordinators This article analyses the Belgian reform of mental health care delivery as a two steps-translation (Callon 1986): the problematization – the devising of a new mental health care model by policy makers, and the interessement – through which “local coordinators” tried to interest local actors to the new model. Based on empirical data, two evidences are stressed: the coordination function is conceived in different ways, ranging from intermediaries to mediators; and the interessement is influenced by systems of concrete action (Friedberg, 1997). Thus, it is argued that in case where translators are appointed to interest local actors to a problematization from the policy arena, their performance is better appraised by considering their commitment to behave as faithful intermediaries or as strategic mediators, and the informal games regulating their system of action. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (33 ULg)
Full Text
See detailChangements institutionnels dans le champs de la santé mentale en Belgique: dynamiques écologiques et sociales
Thunus, Sophie ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2014)

Ce texte examine les changements passés et actuels dans les politiques publiques de santé mentale belge, en s’appuyant sur une approche constructiviste des systèmes professionnels. Dans un premier temps ... [more ▼]

Ce texte examine les changements passés et actuels dans les politiques publiques de santé mentale belge, en s’appuyant sur une approche constructiviste des systèmes professionnels. Dans un premier temps, cette approche permet de comprendre les dynamiques sociales propres aux réformes passées, et de montrer comment ces dynamiques expliquent les caractéristiques actuelles du système belge des soins de santé mentale ; en particulier sa spécialisation, sa segmentation et sa complexité. Dans un second temps, cette approche est appliquée à l’analyse la réforme actuelle de la santé mentale « Vers de meilleurs soins de santé mentale par la réalisation des réseaux et circuits de soins ». En ce qui concerne la réforme, l’approche constructiviste permet de d’identifier et de faire sens des continuités et des discontinuités entre cette réforme et les réformes précédentes. Ensuite, elle permet de saisir la possibilité qu’ont des connaissances locales, développées et portées par les acteurs de terrain, d’impacter sur des changements globaux dans le système. Les chemins particuliers qu’empruntent les connaissances locales pour circuler vers le changement global sont mis en évidence en recourant à la phénoménologie des connaissances en politique, ou Embodied, Inscribed, Enacted Knowlegde in Policy. Celle-ci offre effectivement la possibilité de faire des allers-retours entre le global et le local, pour montrer comment différentes idées relatives à la réforme circulent, et comment ces idées sont assemblées et réassemblées aux niveaux global et local. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe Belgian Reform of Mental Health: Changing the Face of Psychiatric Hospitals
Thunus, Sophie ULg

Conference (2014, September)

This paper focuses on the ongoing reform of psychiatric and mental health care delivery in Belgium. It starts by mentioning particularities of the system’s development, then it defines the reform’s ... [more ▼]

This paper focuses on the ongoing reform of psychiatric and mental health care delivery in Belgium. It starts by mentioning particularities of the system’s development, then it defines the reform’s objectives and policy instruments used to reach these objectives and, finally, it indicates specific issues and outcomes resulting from the implementing. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLa dimension écologique du changement professionnel : Le cas des réformes de la psychiatrie en Belgique
Thunus, Sophie ULg

Conference (2014, June 24)

Le changement des pratiques professionnelles est un enjeu de longue date dans le champ de la santé mentale en Belgique. Depuis les années 1970, les réformes se succèdent afin de stimuler l’évolution d’une ... [more ▼]

Le changement des pratiques professionnelles est un enjeu de longue date dans le champ de la santé mentale en Belgique. Depuis les années 1970, les réformes se succèdent afin de stimuler l’évolution d’une psychiatrie résidentielle, dans laquelle l’hôpital psychiatrique est l’acteur central du système de soins, vers une psychiatrie communautaire et des pratiques de réseaux, en vertu desquels l’hôpital est un acteur parmi d’autres ressources psychosociales et communautaires. En 2010, les ministres en charge de la santé mentale annoncent la mise en place d’une nouvelle réforme. L’objectif est de substituer un modèle de soins fonctionnel au modèle institutionnel ; c’est-à-dire d’achever le processus de transformation du système entamé plusieurs décennies auparavant. A partir d’une analyse longitudinale des principales réformes belges de la psychiatrie et de la santé mentale (1974-1989-2007-2010), nous proposons de conceptualiser le champ comme composé d’écologies liées (Abbott, 1988), sous-tendues par un système d’action concret persistant (Michel Crozier & Friedberg, 1980; Erhard Friedberg, 1997), dont les dynamiques particulières font obstacle à l’implémentation des réseaux de soins communautaires. Ensuite, en nous reposant sur cette conceptualisation, nous formulons une problématisation alternative du changement des pratiques professionnelles, dépassant les thématiques de la défense des privilèges acquis, de l’autonomie dans le travail (Freidson, 1988), ou encore des luttes juridictionnelles (Abbott, 1988). Au niveau méthodologique, l’analyse repose sur une recherche documentaire approfondie (sources primaire et secondaire ; documents politiques et organisationnels) ainsi que sur des entretiens semi-directifs (n=45) et des observations (n=75) réalisées entre 2008 et 2014. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNégociation du sens du travail et définition du groupe interprofessionnel : les cas des projets exploratoires dans le champ de la santé mentale en Belgique
Thunus, Sophie ULg

Conference (2014, June 19)

Au printemps 2010, les ministres en charge de la santé publique ont annoncé la mise en place d’une grande réforme de l’organisation des soins de santé mentale en Belgique. Le modèle d’organisation à ... [more ▼]

Au printemps 2010, les ministres en charge de la santé publique ont annoncé la mise en place d’une grande réforme de l’organisation des soins de santé mentale en Belgique. Le modèle d’organisation à mettre en place et le programme de la réforme étaient exposés dans un petit guide bleu distribué aux participants lors d’un événement national auquel assistaient les acteurs- clé du champ, notamment des professionnels de la santé mentale, les associations d’usagers, les responsables des organisations de soins locales, les autorités administratives régionales, des experts scientifiques. Cette réforme s’inscrivait dans un contexte international caractérisé par une mutation d’un modèle de soins basé sur la psychiatrie résidentielle, vers un modèle de soins de santé mentale communautaire. Au niveau Belge, la réforme était présentée comme l’étape ultime d’un processus qui aurait débuté à la fin des années 1990, par la mise en place de structures de soins alternatives et de projets exploratoires, pour aboutir en 2010, avec l’exploration et l’institutionnalisation progressive d’un modèle de soins résolument communautaire. Aussi, étant donné l’importance des enjeux institutionnels et professionnels associés à ce processus du changement, la réforme reposait sur un dispositif d’action publique original. Celui-ci impliquait directement les acteurs locaux en les invitant à participer à la définition de nouvelles modalités de travail, qui seraient progressivement évaluées et collectées par les autorités publiques. Dans cet article, nous proposons d’analyser ce processus de changement en le replaçant dans le processus temporel et dans le cadre institutionnel dans lequel il prend place. Effectivement, nous souhaitons mettre en évidence que les ressorts du changement, compris comme la capacité à mobiliser des pratiques professionnelles alternatives et des réseaux d’acteurs développés au cours des dernières décennies, sont difficilement compréhensibles en dehors d’une telle conceptualisation. De même, les jeux d’acteurs susceptibles de faire obstacle au changement, ou de lui donner des directions particulières, sont le fruit d’une construction sociale progressive, dont les premières bases ont été posées au lendemain de la seconde guerre. Cette approche du changement dans l’organisation du travail en santé mentale est principalement ancrée en sociologie de l’action collective et en sociologie des professions. Ces deux approches ont connu des évolutions spécifiques dont certaines se sont révélées pertinentes par rapport à notre domaine de recherche. Nous présentons ces développements dans la première partie de cet article, afin d’expliquer le cadre d’analyse qui sous-tend les deux parties suivantes. L’approche interactionniste du changement et les principaux concepts de la sociologie de l’action organisée sont centraux à ce cadre d’analyse. Ils supportent le récit de l’évolution du champ au cours des dernières décennies et celui de la réforme en cours, présentés dans les secondes et troisièmes parties de cet article. Ces deux récits alimentent à leur tour des considérations relatives aux conditions sociales et techniques dans lesquelles des pratiques professionnelles alternatives, ou « marginales », peuvent être utilisées au sein d’un processus de changement portant à la fois sur le modèle professionnel et institutionnel dominant le champ de la santé mentale. Ces considérations sont présentées dans la quatrième et dernière partie de cet article. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe cas de l'appropriation: stabilité et discontinuités des réformes de la psychiatrie et de la santé mentale en Belgique
Thunus, Sophie ULg

Conference (2014, May 15)

Cette contribution porte sur les transformations de l’organisation du système de soins psychiatriques et de santé mentale en Belgique, entre les années 1960 et 2010. Elle repose sur une enquête de terrain ... [more ▼]

Cette contribution porte sur les transformations de l’organisation du système de soins psychiatriques et de santé mentale en Belgique, entre les années 1960 et 2010. Elle repose sur une enquête de terrain réalisée entre 2009 et 2013. Celle-ci a combiné des méthodes qualitatives ; parmi lesquelles l’analyse des documents politiques, institutionnels et organisationnels, des entretiens semi-directifs et de l’observation directe. Dans la cadre de cette contribution, nous nous attachons à résumer les résultats de l’analyse de quatre réformes réalisées dans le champ de la santé mentale. Cette analyse mobilise les apports de la sociologie interactionniste (Blumer, 1986; Strauss, 1978; Strauss & Baszanger, 1992), afin d’appréhender le processus de changement en relation avec les actions/interactions des acteurs qui y interviennent au cours du temps, et l’analyse stratégique des organisations (Crozier & Friedberg, 1992; Friedberg, 1997), afin de saisir les jeux d’acteurs qui sous-tendent le processus et lui donnent une direction particulière. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailKnowledge work: organising mental health care networks in Belgium
Thunus, Sophie ULg; Cerfontaine, Gaëtan ULg; Schoenaers, Frédéric ULg

in Freeman, Richard; Sturdy, Steven (Eds.) Knowledge in policy - Embodied-Inscribed-Enacted (2014)

This chapter analyses the production of knowledge in mental health care networks during a policy process that took place in Belgium between 2007 and 2010.By drawing on a case study of the horizontal pilot ... [more ▼]

This chapter analyses the production of knowledge in mental health care networks during a policy process that took place in Belgium between 2007 and 2010.By drawing on a case study of the horizontal pilot ‘Adults: General Psychiatry’ (AGP) – the discussion of different local pilots in adult general psychiatry – this chapter sets out to investigate empirically: how practitioners embodied knowledge of the new practices; how they came to enact that knowledge in the course of cross-project discussions; and how they coped with its inscription in a proposal for structural reform. At the same time, by also drawing on Actor-Network Theory (ANT) and the sociology of translation (Callon, 1999; Latour, 2007; Freeman, 2009), the discussion shows how ANT and the phenomenology of embodied, inscribed and enacted knowledge complement each another. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (10 ULg)
Full Text
See detailDu secret professionnel au secret professionnel partagé: approches sociologiques
Thunus, Sophie ULg

in L'observatoire, Créateur d'échange et de transversalité (2013), 77

Cet article se réfère à trois approches sociologiques -la sociologie des organisations, le sociologie des professions et la sociologie interactionniste-, afin de s'interroger sur le statut des ... [more ▼]

Cet article se réfère à trois approches sociologiques -la sociologie des organisations, le sociologie des professions et la sociologie interactionniste-, afin de s'interroger sur le statut des informations, partagées ou dissimulées, au cours des interactions sociales. Ces approches sociologiques permettent d'esquisser un cadre réflexif relatif à la question du secret professionnel partagé. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (21 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhen policy makers consult professional groups in public policy formation: transversal consultation in the Belgian Mental Health Sector
Thunus, Sophie ULg; Schoenaers, Frédéric ULg

in Policy and Society (2012), 31(3), 145-158

This contribution focuses on a policy consultation process: the ‘‘transversal consultation’’. Launched in 2007 in the Belgian Mental Health Sector, this consultation had to capture the experience-based ... [more ▼]

This contribution focuses on a policy consultation process: the ‘‘transversal consultation’’. Launched in 2007 in the Belgian Mental Health Sector, this consultation had to capture the experience-based knowledge of service users and professionals involved in local projects aimed at experimenting working conditions in mental health care networks. This policy challenges the existing hospital-centred model of care, characterized by a medical approach and professional specialization, by promoting instead a pluridisciplinary approach in mental health care networks. In this contribution, a case of this transversal consultation process is analysed by relying on a theoretical framework drawn from the Sociology of Organizations and the Sociology of Public Action. The analysis emphasizes the strategic use that ismade of the consultation process, and stresses the gap observed between its formal objective and its perceived outcome: more than producing experience-based knowledge about mental health care networks, the transversal consultation challenged power relations sustaining the current organization of the mental health system. It shortly discusses, as a conclusion, the outcome of the initiative. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (7 ULg)
Full Text
See detailEvolution du champ de la Santé mentale en Belgique: de l’asile vers les réseaux et circuits de soins
Thunus, Sophie ULg; Cerfontaine, Gaëtan ULg; Schoenaers, Frédéric ULg

in Observatoire : Revue d'Action Sociale & Médico-Sociale (2012), 72

Detailed reference viewed: 202 (36 ULg)